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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!
I just joined, but didn't see a thread about this and thought it would be a good conversation. For those in a place that aren't in their retirement, but old enough (or just in a mindset) to want a peaceful beautiful place that still has some fun.

I know Cancun and Playa Del Carmen have a large community of expats, but exceed the level of touristy, and I loved Isla Mujeres and it's eclectic community, but it's gotten there too. Mexico City is great, but that seems like the obvious answer, is another large busy city & where so many other 'digital nomads' end up.

I would love to hear about experiences in places that don't feel like a tourist trap, but has a range of ages in the community (I have some great friends who are retired in their 60s, but not all are friendly to 30-somethings with tattoos).

For members of the forum who are younger, do you have a place you especially like in Quintana Roo/near the beach towns?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I can't edit - but I wanted to add a note to say I wasn't meaning to imply a total expat community, but one expats have moved to that have a vibrant younger (local & expat) side.
 

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Hi, Annnelise! Welcome to the forum! Have you considered Tulum? I hear it's less developed Than the other nearby towns. Also consider San Miguel De Allende. It's a vibrant artistic community with expats of various ages. My wife and I are going there next week to check it out as well as Queretaro and Guanajuato which are both nearby San Miguel. We're also looking for our Mexican Home. :)
 

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I am not in Quintana Roo so this may not be responsive to your post. But, I have been living in Mexico and working remotely for a U.S. company since 2012. I do not understand why more people who have this flexibility are not flocking to Mexico. The weather, the food, the cost of living, the lifestyle available here; all of it, to me at least, is just so incredible that my only regret is that I waited until I was in my 50's to do this.

Just yesterday (Sunday) we were invited by some friends to drive to a beach location just about half an hour from our house for dinner. We left the house at 12:30, were in the restaurant right on the beach (literally there were steps in the back of the restaurant that led directly to the beach) just after 1:00. We were there all afternoon enjoying tremendous seafood, drinks, desserts and even a short walk on the beach and in the surf. We left the place a little before 6:00. And the total bill for seven people? Less than $2,100 pesos. So, with tip, just a little over $300 pesos (around $17 USD) per person.

I live in Colima so I'm on the opposite side of the country from Quintana Roo. Colima itself is not at all touristy and does not have that much of an expat community. However, just in my neighborhood, I know of four other couples where at least one of them is from NOB (three from the U.S., one from Canada).

Anyway, best of luck in your search and rest assured that not only are there many people from the U.S. moving to Mexico to retire, there are also many of us who are still working, albeit remotely, and already enjoying all that Mexico has to offer.
 

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I am not in Quintana Roo so this may not be responsive to your post. But, I have been living in Mexico and working remotely for a U.S. company since 2012. I do not understand why more people who have this flexibility are not flocking to Mexico. The weather, the food, the cost of living, the lifestyle available here; all of it, to me at least, is just so incredible that my only regret is that I waited until I was in my 50's to do this.

. . .

Anyway, best of luck in your search and rest assured that not only are there many people from the U.S. moving to Mexico to retire, there are also many of us who are still working, albeit remotely, and already enjoying all that Mexico has to offer.
You are lucky that you were able to find a job that allows you to work remotely in Mexico. Not everyone is able to do this. What first inspired you to make the move?
 

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You are lucky that you were able to find a job that allows you to work remotely in Mexico. Not everyone is able to do this. What first inspired you to make the move?
After my divorce from my first wife, I met and started dating a lovely woman who had a home here in Colima. We first came here for a visit in, I believe, March or April of 2012. It was actually kind of an exploratory visit for me; mostly to see if it was possible for me to work from here. And it worked out. By December of that year we were, essentially, living here and in February of 2013 we made it official and moved here with all of our things.

I know I am VERY lucky, not only to be able to have a job in the U.S. while living in Mexico but also to be married to someone who helped make that possible.
 

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I am not in Quintana Roo so this may not be responsive to your post. But, I have been living in Mexico and working remotely for a U.S. company since 2012. I do not understand why more people who have this flexibility are not flocking to Mexico. The weather, the food, the cost of living, the lifestyle available here; all of it, to me at least, is just so incredible that my only regret is that I waited until I was in my 50's to do this.
For me Mexico is very attractive with great people and incredible culture, also a lot cheaper than the US and Europe, but let's not be in the "living the dream" camp with rosy glasses.

There are several factors that might make someone not want to "flock to Mexico". Let's start with language and culture because the differences are significant and maybe not everyone finds them a positive. I consider myself bilingual and bi-cultural but what about other people? Talk about culture shock, how about 3,000 meters elevation with lush greenery, rain, and lots of corn growing?

But there are other more concrete things, where we live in the rural countryside the water went out for a month recently. I can tell you, water is pretty primary. I think it is because a lot of people don't pay their water bill. I know our renter doesn't, we discovered he hadn't paid it in over two years. There is no zoning. You might have a world class view and then someone builds a three story house immediately in front of you. Then there are the neighbors that burn their trash, what a mess, and now there is a garbage truck that comes by every week so there's really no excuse. How about the taxi drivers that always try to steal 5 pesos. Let's talk about pueblo dogs that are mean and the garbage that is strewn about. The government is corrupt, I don't think any reasonably informed person can arrive at any other conclusion.
 

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For me Mexico is very attractive with great people and incredible culture, also a lot cheaper than the US and Europe, but let's not be in the "living the dream" camp with rosy glasses.

There are several factors that might make someone not want to "flock to Mexico". Let's start with language and culture because the differences are significant and maybe not everyone finds them a positive. I consider myself bilingual and bi-cultural but what about other people? Talk about culture shock, how about 3,000 meters elevation with lush greenery, rain, and lots of corn growing?

But there are other more concrete things, where we live in the rural countryside the water went out for a month recently. I can tell you, water is pretty primary. I think it is because a lot of people don't pay their water bill. I know our renter doesn't, we discovered he hadn't paid it in over two years. There is no zoning. You might have a world class view and then someone builds a three story house immediately in front of you. Then there are the neighbors that burn their trash, what a mess, and now there is a garbage truck that comes by every week so there's really no excuse. How about the taxi drivers that always try to steal 5 pesos. Let's talk about pueblo dogs that are mean and the garbage that is strewn about. The government is corrupt, I don't think any reasonably informed person can arrive at any other conclusion.
Anywhere you live you are going to have pluses and minuses. I lived for twenty years in the Chicago suburbs. There were so many rules about what you could and could not do, on your own property, it was ridiculous. So, some places have too many regulations and others not enough. Loosing water for a month would definitely be tough to handle. But something very similar happened to my sister and brother-in-law in rural Texas. I realize that there is government corruption here. But at least here it is still illegal. In the US, buying politicians is practically legal now.

I am not wearing any rosy glasses but, I am living the dream. Of course, YMMV.
 

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I know you said the coast but you also don't want a tourist destination. I'm afraid the two go together. Even Tulum has changed. I found Oaxaca a good mix of expats without the city losing the authentic feel of Mexico. The streets are clean and there is a lot of old world culture there. The food is great and there are pyramids very nearby. On any given day you will find younger English speaking people. Not a lot but usually a few.
 

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Oaxaca the center is beautiful the rest of the city not that great and the traffic is awful. Are they a lot of younger expats in Oaxaca outside of the students that come and go?
When I am there I pretty much stick to the ndigenous communities and not the expat community but I was wondering what the expat community is like.there , a lot seem to live n the Etlas and around the city ..and is older , the young people seem to come and go or is that my impression?
The ruins ae nice but if you live there I bet you only go there when outof towners visit just like Palenque, Bonampak and Yaxchilan or the Eiffel tower...
 

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Oaxaca the center is beautiful the rest of the city not that great and the traffic is awful. Are they a lot of younger expats in Oaxaca outside of the students that come and go?
When I am there I pretty much stick to the ndigenous communities and not the expat community but I was wondering what the expat community is like.there , a lot seem to live n the Etlas and around the city ..and is older , the young people seem to come and go or is that my impression?
The ruins ae nice but if you live there I bet you only go there when outof towners visit just like Palenque, Bonampak and Yaxchilan or the Eiffel tower...
The young people do tend to come and go but there are a lot of them. On any given day in the main square you will run into young people on vacation. Traffic is awful in any city in Mexico of any size, mainly because of the narrow streets, hundreds of buses, people trying to back into the only available spot while everyone else blows their horn, etc. It's almost as if they built the entire country and then said, "Oh yeah, we are going to need parking places."

Oaxaca has a lot of festivals and things to do and a lot of places to eat. The mezcal is exceptional as is the food.
 

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You can buy Mezcal anywhere in Mexico and you have to like it to really njoy it..

The traffic in my opinion is way worst than many other cities, people drive like idiots and the town is poorly laid out, including the main boulevard that is zig zaging in such a way that if you are not used to it , it is a good place to have a head on especially at night.

I usually stay in Teotitlan del Valle so believe me I know about the Mezcal and I do not care for it.. the food is good. and there are lots of festivals but no more than in other indigenous areas. it is the same in Michoacan or Chiapas, only one thing the fiestas in Oaxaca are long.. One wedding is a one week affair.. only one day in Chiapas..

That road to Teotitlan and to the Isthmus is blood alley as well. I hate driving that road.. and I am about to do it again on Tuesday..and again a few days later to go back to Chiapas.

Oaxaca is a very attractive place to go and visit , not sure I would want to live there. We have considered it several times and every times we go down and get serious about it we change out mind.. We find the town claustrofobic. Strange how a place so attractive to visit can change when you really look into living there..
 

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You can buy Mezcal anywhere in Mexico and you have to like it to really njoy it..

The traffic in my opinion is way worst than many other cities, people drive like idiots and the town is poorly laid out, including the main boulevard that is zig zaging in such a way that if you are not used to it , it is a good place to have a head on especially at night.

I usually stay in Teotitlan del Valle so believe me I know about the Mezcal and I do not care for it.. the food is good. and there are lots of festivals but no more than in other indigenous areas. it is the same in Michoacan or Chiapas, only one thing the fiestas in Oaxaca are long.. One wedding is a one week affair.. only one day in Chiapas..

That road to Teotitlan and to the Isthmus is blood alley as well. I hate driving that road.. and I am about to do it again on Tuesday..and again a few days later to go back to Chiapas.

Oaxaca is a very attractive place to go and visit , not sure I would want to live there. We have considered it several times and every times we go down and get serious about it we change out mind.. We find the town claustrofobic. Strange how a place so attractive to visit can change when you really look into living there..
I agree about the layout of the streets but I find the traffic terrible in all medium to large cities here and the people are very aggressive drivers to put it mildly. Even out in the country where we live, cutting you off or pulling out in front of you is a normal part of driving.

Every person is different as to what appeals to them, some like the city, some don't, it's the same with the beach. We live way out in the mountains. In our small village there are 39 homes, 97.37% have electricity, 0 have piped water, 57% have an indoor toilet, 42% have a refrigerator, 7.89% have a washing machine. We are happy here but it is not for everyone. We lived in the city and have lived near expats, we prefer the quiet of the mountains.
 
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If I lived in Oaxaca I would live in a village before I would live in the city I agree with you on that one..
I never forgot a ride from hell out of Teotitlan several years ago.. It was late and there were not colectivo so we got a taxi.. the driver stopped at 3 or 4 houses to announce he was going to the city and then drove like a total maniac, ran all the red lights , we had several close callls and he would laugh saying " did I scare you"?.. Now I drive .. even at night rather than trust the country driver going to the city..
 

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There are several factors that might make someone not want to "flock to Mexico". Let's start with language and culture because the differences are significant and maybe not everyone finds them a positive. I consider myself bilingual and bi-cultural but what about other people?
I have found its very important to be patient and polite in MX. Example, you check into a hotel in the USA, if you are rude to the staff, there are very seldom repercussions. You do the same at a hotel in Mexico, if you later need help, I've seen the staff make life difficult. If you are intentionally nice, sometimes they'll even do extra, and not just staff you've interacted with, its clear to me that the staff talk amongst themselves about which guests are nice, and which ones are not. I wonder sometimes if the Canadian and American people I've seen being offensive are oblivious to their own conduct.

As far as where to live, me personally, when I visited Guadalajara in 2015, I stayed right in the center of everything (near the Jardin de San Francisco). Superb for visiting, tons of sights nearby, lots of great walks. But live in that specific neighborhood? No thanks, too congested.

I will be living in Guadalajara later this year, initially I will target being in or near Monraz (west of city center). This area seemed to me to have a nice mix of active avenues and quiet residential pockets. And a substantial Walmart - I like shopping local, but I also like Walmart. If anyone has comments about this perception, please post them!
 
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