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Hi, I'm 18 and I've just finished my A levels and am planning on taking a gap year then going to university (to study criminology and psychology). Once I finish university in 4 years I am planning on moving to Spain or at least attempt to. I have studied Spanish from GCSE through to A level and expected to get a B. The reason I want to move to Spain is because I have been on a Spanish exchange with my college twice and have been back to see my exchange partner a couple of times and have fallen in love with the country.

That's my background, and I was just wondering if anyone could give me any advice on how to move to Spain best places to go easiest jobs to get. I'm going to be working throughout my year off and saving up money, I also have savings which I intend to use to try and find my feet in Spain. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Screeno.
 

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So you are saying you will be moving to Spain in 5 years time, (gap year + 4 yrs university)??

Spain can change a lot in many aspects in 5 years.

If however, you mean that you will be spending your GAP year in Spain, then I can only wish you lots of luck, not that you will need it, a hunky and cute 18 years old will get a job as a bartender anywhere, lol!

Things are rather bad at the moment but i am sure bar work can be one of the things you might want to look for, i.e. bars, pubs, restaurants, etc.

It would be good if you say where in Spain are you moving to, then we'll know a bit more.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So you are saying you will be moving to Spain in 5 years time, (gap year + 4 yrs university)??

Spain can change a lot in many aspects in 5 years.

If however, you mean that you will be spending your GAP year in Spain, then I can only wish you lots of luck, not that you will need it, a hunky and cute 18 years old will get a job as a bartender anywhere, lol!

Things are rather bad at the moment but i am sure bar work can be one of the things you might want to look for, i.e. bars, pubs, restaurants, etc.

It would be good if you say where in Spain are you moving to, then we'll know a bit more.

Cheers!
Oh yes I didn't make myself clear enough, I will be working in England for my gap year, and saving up so that I have a bulk of savings to help me in Spain after uni.

Well I have been to the south of Spain on holidays but for me it is too much like Britain (but of course if that is the only place I can get a job I would move there in a heart beat). But preferably I would like to move to Zaragoza or somewhere near as I have quite a few friends there from the previous exchanges I have been on.
 

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Good man! Zaragoza is brill! As is Pamplona (where I am from). They are both big enough cities. However, 5 years is a long time yet and it is never too early to start planning... but hey! you are eager!

Any Qs, let me know.

(You'll probably be married and with children in 2020 !!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good man! Zaragoza is brill! As is Pamplona (where I am from). They are both big enough cities. However, 5 years is a long time yet and it is never too early to start planning... but hey! you are eager!

Any Qs, let me know.

(You'll probably be married and with children in 2020 !!)
My main question is whether my Spanish at a B grade at A level would be good enough to survive in Spain (at least until I pick up the language fluently). However before I move out there at uni I may possibly be studying a year of my course out in Spain, therefore helping me with the language.

(Let's hope not I'm planning on living a little first) :hippie:
 

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I think B is OK. Just remember most people come here with no Spanish whatsoever, and 20 years later still not Spanish whatsoever... trust me, there are a few too many of those around here.

The good thing about moving to Zaragoza or around, is that you will not find many people that speak English so you will have to make the effort.

My partner didn't have any Spanish, and 4 years later is almost proficient. Never been to school and just living around Spanish people all the time did the trick. I am Spanish myself but we have never spoken any word of Spanish as we always talk in English. So I think you will be more than fine with a B in Spanish, by the time you want to come over in 2020, you will be better than me!

Just a couple of hours a week for the next 5 years will get you far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think B is OK. Just remember most people come here with no Spanish whatsoever, and 20 years later still not Spanish whatsoever... trust me, there are a few too many of those around here.

The good thing about moving to Zaragoza or around, is that you will not find many people that speak English so you will have to make the effort.

My partner didn't have any Spanish, and 4 years later is almost proficient. Never been to school and just living around Spanish people all the time did the trick. I am Spanish myself but we have never spoken any word of Spanish as we always talk in English. So I think you will be more than fine with a B in Spanish, by the time you want to come over in 2020, you will be better than me!

Just a couple of hours a week for the next 5 years will get you far.
Yeah that is one of the reasons I don't want to move to a more touristy part so that I can learn Spanish fluently.

Thanks so much for this information, I will ask any questions if they spring to mind if that's ok.
 

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Hi, I'm 18 and I've just finished my A levels and am planning on taking a gap year then going to university (to study criminology and psychology). Once I finish university in 4 years I am planning on moving to Spain or at least attempt to. I have studied Spanish from GCSE through to A level and expected to get a B. The reason I want to move to Spain is because I have been on a Spanish exchange with my college twice and have been back to see my exchange partner a couple of times and have fallen in love with the country.

That's my background, and I was just wondering if anyone could give me any advice on how to move to Spain best places to go easiest jobs to get. I'm going to be working throughout my year off and saving up money, I also have savings which I intend to use to try and find my feet in Spain. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Screeno.
It's great that you're already putting out feelers about Spain, but the country can, and hopefully will change a lot in 5 years, especially for your age group which is experiencing crippling unempoyment.
A couple of things... Personally I prefer Spain from Madrid up, but don't think southern Spain in general is "too much like Britain". Others would argue that there is nothing more Spanish than the olives that come from Andalucia, plus the music and the heat! There are few places which have a high percentage of foreigners living and the majority of those foreigners are British, but move 10 miles down or inland and you could be in another world. I don't think there are huge numbers of British living in Albacete for example or in Cuidad Real and if there are they are avoidable too. I'm just saying that you may want to take into consideration some places in the south when the time comes.
I do think going to Zaragoza or some where further north might be a good idea too
Another thing is that an A level is always going to help you. Even if you lack fluency in the beginning you will gain it more quickly than many others because of the base that you have. However, if you don't keep in constant contact with a language you'll lose it so you need to keep up with Spanish news, or watch Spanish tv online or skype with someone, I don't know, but you've got to keep your language skills alive.
 

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Spanish

Hi, I'm 18 and I've just finished my A levels and am planning on taking a gap year then going to university (to study criminology and psychology). Once I finish university in 4 years I am planning on moving to Spain or at least attempt to. I have studied Spanish from GCSE through to A level and expected to get a B. The reason I want to move to Spain is because I have been on a Spanish exchange with my college twice and have been back to see my exchange partner a couple of times and have fallen in love with the country.

That's my background, and I was just wondering if anyone could give me any advice on how to move to Spain best places to go easiest jobs to get. I'm going to be working throughout my year off and saving up money, I also have savings which I intend to use to try and find my feet in Spain. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Screeno.
Don't forget free programmes like duolingo and why don't you check out once you are at uni for some exchange classes with Spaniards. There are bound to be some around and you will already have a good basic knowledge of the language.
Good luck with your degree.
 

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With all due resepect, your English qualifications (GCSE and A level) will be nbothing more than an introduction to the language, but as you have travelled to Spain before I suspect you will know this already.

I had been visiting Spain regularly for about 7 years before I moved and I studied GCSE (A grade) and AS level (A grade) but I admit to being pretty disappointed when I tried to settle into Spanish life and realised that 95% of "street level" conversation went over my head!

As soon as I got to Spain I did an intensive 1 month (6 hours a day / 5 days a week) course in the center of Madrid.

That course taught me more than the two UK qualifications had in two years of study.
 

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The OP should be able to find volunteer work at summer camps all over Spain.

E.g. Teaching English in Spain | Diverbo

But they won't get to practice any Spanish.

Another option could be to spend a few weeks each summer at a Spanish school. This would cost money of course, but good schools do offer quite a good insight into the local area.
 

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Screeno, I admire your youthful ambition in hoping to move to Spain. In the four years ahead of you, you will have matured and probably will be in touch of real reality. If you do, you will be well aware that your hope of obtaining decent employment in Spain is equivalent to the chances of Rep of Ireland winning the World Cup.

Learn your Spanish, listen to Spanish radio (surprisingly good), watch Spanish television (not surprisingly godawful). Come to Spain and enjoy some holidays, but forget about earning any money here.
 

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Screeno, I admire your youthful ambition in hoping to move to Spain. In the four years ahead of you, you will have matured and probably will be in touch of real reality. If you do, you will be well aware that your hope of obtaining decent employment in Spain is equivalent to the chances of Rep of Ireland winning the World Cup.

Learn your Spanish, listen to Spanish radio (surprisingly good), watch Spanish television (not surprisingly godawful). Come to Spain and enjoy some holidays, but forget about earning any money here.
Congratulations on being both incorrect and somewhat patronising to the op at the same time. There is work to be found in Spain for those with native English, fluent Spanish, skills that are in demand, and who are prepared to live in the parts of Spain where the work is.

Assuming the op will have fairly decent Spanish by the time the leave uni, then the problem will be gaining the skills. A degree in criminology and psychology might be a bit too specialised, so the op might have to decide whether they really want to pursue that as a career or move to Spain, and if it's the latter they might need to consider training in some other area.

The ideal situation for the op might be to do a degree that allows you to spend up to a year studying in Spain. This can be achieved through programmes like Erasmus, but I'm not sure if it is available for the degree the op is going to study.
 

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Screeno, I admire your youthful ambition in hoping to move to Spain. In the four years ahead of you, you will have matured and probably will be in touch of real reality. If you do, you will be well aware that your hope of obtaining decent employment in Spain is equivalent to the chances of Rep of Ireland winning the World Cup.

Learn your Spanish, listen to Spanish radio (surprisingly good), watch Spanish television (not surprisingly godawful). Come to Spain and enjoy some holidays, but forget about earning any money here.

Far too much negativity "man"...

Of course we find it necessary and our duty to point out to potential immigrants that making a living in Spain is very, very tough, and certainly requires a strong knowledge of Spanish.

But that doesn't mean that it is impossible. Several of us have "made it" in professional careers in Spain, so why wouldn't the OP?

I once had the misfortune to have to report a crime to the local police. The guys that arrived at my flat were as you would expect for Policía Local, except for one of them had a clearly anglo-saxon name. We made our denuncia as normal, in Spanish but when they were about to leave I couldn't resist the temptation to speak to him in English and ask why the English name.

Turns out he was English, he had moved to Spain, wanted to be in the police force, learnt Spanish, studied the "oposiciones" and obtained Spanish nationality and then got his position.

I doubt that many have enough dedication and patience to do all that (I guess it must have taken close to 10 years) but it can be done.

I fear far more for those that say they want to move to Spain for the "lifestyle" have no qualifications and say that they will "turn their hand to anything"... but even some of those probably succeed!!
 

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Apparently the police also run exchanges between countries. An Italian friend of mine who is a policeman in Rome told me that they currently have a Spanish policeman on secondment.
 

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Work as an English Teaching Assistant (Auxiliar de conversación)! It's a great job with good hours and great pay for what you have to do. You can get jobs through the British Council.
 
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