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Young family of 4 with 2 daughters aged 8 and 3, looking for advice about moving to Spain (long term renting) preferably torrevieja area, looking to move in the next 6 months, fortunately to be financially secure so not looking for local work, and advice on areas with good schools and good communities would be greatly appreciated
Many thanks
Mike
 

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Young family of 4 with 2 daughters aged 8 and 3, looking for advice about moving to Spain (long term renting) preferably torrevieja area, looking to move in the next 6 months, fortunately to be financially secure so not looking for local work, and advice on areas with good schools and good communities would be greatly appreciated
Many thanks
Mike
My advice would be to have a good look around the forum including FAQ's and find out about healthcare requirements, educational diferences, and possible changes that Brexit might bring about. There are a lot of things that are uncertain at the moment and you might decide that it's too risky.
On the plus side you don't need to look for work (unemployment is much worse than the UK especially in the south) and your daughters are at a good age to make the move and for the elder daughter's sake you wouldn't want to put it off too much longer...
 

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Can only provide info about Malaga area - moved with two kids very similar age in May and so far wonderful experience but haven't had the benefit of year round living to be sure, but we wanted to be immersed in Spanish life as much as possible.

All about personal preferences of course but it's everything we hoped it would be and more.
 

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My son who is 11 goes to school in Torrevieja. I really think you have to be very careful with this issue. Firstly Torrevieja for Brits seems to signify quite a large area compared to what the spanish think when they talk of Torrevieja. Do you mean the town or the surrounding urbanisations like La Zenia, Playa Flamenco, Villa Martin etc? Most ex pats live outside of the town and many seem to have their kids in the private schools or international ones. I imagine that in those areas outside of the town there are more Brits in the state schools than in the town. My son goes to one in the town. There are no Brits in his school and therefore Spanish is a must. The head teacher told us that the British children who had been to the school before had never stayed as they simply couldn't fit in. I think the problem that is often overlooked is that while it is true that your children will eventually learn spanish in the state school , unless you have spanish when they start ( and I mean good spanish) you will simply not understand the program and will be unable to help and support them with even basic homework. Nearly all children have support with this in primary either w with parents or after school academies. Secondly if you yourselves are not going to work I don't see how you will integrate into spanish society sufficiently to influence and understand and guide you kids. Your kids will need to become fairly spanish in their ways to integrate with the other kids and it will be hard if the family life has none of these markers.
Finally I afraid to say that as many families don't have spanish they often believe their children are more capable than they really are.
So my advice is either send them to a private international school where there will at least be other parents and children who speak English and the school will be more experienced with this or else expect a very steep learning curve.
 

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My son who is 11 goes to school in Torrevieja. I really think you have to be very careful with this issue. Firstly Torrevieja for Brits seems to signify quite a large area compared to what the spanish think when they talk of Torrevieja. Do you mean the town or the surrounding urbanisations like La Zenia, Playa Flamenco, Villa Martin etc? Most ex pats live outside of the town and many seem to have their kids in the private schools or international ones. I imagine that in those areas outside of the town there are more Brits in the state schools than in the town. My son goes to one in the town. There are no Brits in his school and therefore Spanish is a must. The head teacher told us that the British children who had been to the school before had never stayed as they simply couldn't fit in. I think the problem that is often overlooked is that while it is true that your children will eventually learn spanish in the state school , unless you have spanish when they start ( and I mean good spanish) you will simply not understand the program and will be unable to help and support them with even basic homework. Nearly all children have support with this in primary either w with parents or after school academies. Secondly if you yourselves are not going to work I don't see how you will integrate into spanish society sufficiently to influence and understand and guide you kids. Your kids will need to become fairly spanish in their ways to integrate with the other kids and it will be hard if the family life has none of these markers.
Finally I afraid to say that as many families don't have spanish they often believe their children are more capable than they really are.
So my advice is either send them to a private international school where there will at least be other parents and children who speak English and the school will be more experienced with this or else expect a very steep learning curve.
Starting with the last comment first, yes, people who don't speak the language often mistake the level of Spanish that others have. Also communicating with people in shops or at the doctor's is not the same as studying or working with the language.
The success of children in Spain will depend not only on the level of Spanish that they have or attain after a few years, but also (quite obviously) on their homelife and support. on the help available at school and of the attitude of both home and school.
Not all parents can provide the learning environment needed, and not only because they don't speak Spanish. Some parents underestimate the time needed to establish themselves in a new country and end up with less time for their families when starting out. Some don't understand how schools here operate and by that I mean for example that teachers don't always contact parents when there's a problem ; parents need to contact teachers and make sure everything's ok rather than wait for teachers to contact them.
I also agree that if children are to intergrate into Spanish life
kids will need to become fairly spanish in their ways
the biggie here being timetabling. People eat and go to bed here at very different times and it's very difficult if you don't adapt.
Not all schools have resources available for teaching children with limited language ability and not all teachers are welcoming to these children.
 

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While Kaipa makes some very good points, I wouldn't send an 8 year old and a 3 year old to a British/International school unless you plan on leaving Spain after only a year or two. If you plan on staying longer then your kids will have to integrate with the locals sooner or later, and sending them to a Spanish school is the best way of achieving this. If necessary you can pay a tutor to help with homework, or you could target bilingual state schools where a lot of the material will be in English anyway. Yes it will still be a challenge, but isn't that part of the reason for moving to a different country?
 
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