Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
US to UK.

We are trying to figure out what will go & what will stay in storage or get sold. I have not gotten any shipping quotes yet for anything so I have no idea. We want to rent fully furnished but are willing to purchase items upon arrival if we don't find anything suitable.

It is even worth it to ship anything except clothing?

We were thinking computer & xbox but wondered if it would be less expensive or the same cost to just purchase those items upon arrival.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,064 Posts
US to UK.

We are trying to figure out what will go & what will stay in storage or get sold. I have not gotten any shipping quotes yet for anything so I have no idea. We want to rent fully furnished but are willing to purchase items upon arrival if we don't find anything suitable.

It is even worth it to ship anything except clothing?

We were thinking computer & xbox but wondered if it would be less expensive or the same cost to just purchase those items upon arrival.
It's probably best to leave your small appliances at home as fully furnished here usually means that you get toasters, irons, vacuums, things like that. If you brought say your food processor you would need a transformer not just an adaptor plug. They are big and bulky and take up a lot of room and appliances often run hot on them anyway. Plus, flats tend to be on the small side and you don't want to be wasting valuable space with transformers all over the place. If the company is paying for it, you may want to bring your own towels and sheets although bed sizes are slightly different here. You may also want to bring your own pots and pans if you are into cooking and have nice stuff because you're not going to get the the best quality in a rental. I had friends who were doing a company move bring me a new set of brand name pots and pans as they were easily half price in the US.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
US to UK.

We are trying to figure out what will go & what will stay in storage or get sold. I have not gotten any shipping quotes yet for anything so I have no idea. We want to rent fully furnished but are willing to purchase items upon arrival if we don't find anything suitable.

It is even worth it to ship anything except clothing?

We were thinking computer & xbox but wondered if it would be less expensive or the same cost to just purchase those items upon arrival.
I would think it depends if you are planning on staying on the UK for a short time (maybe a work visa) or for the rest of your life (Spouse visa). It doesn't make any sense to plan on moving for the rest of your life and having a storage space in the US.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
I would think it depends if you are planning on staying on the UK for a short time (maybe a work visa) or for the rest of your life (Spouse visa). It doesn't make any sense to plan on moving for the rest of your life and having a storage space in the US.

M
I just saw that you are coming over for work 2 - 4 years. I would only take what you think is really necessary (if you are getting a furnished flat, it shouldn't be much, probably just clothes). The computer isn't essential, except for the hard drive and a back up to make sure you don't loose content. My experience with anything electrical made for the US in the UK is that it "burns out" (unless it was made to be duel voltage).

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
If your computer is older and you were thinking about replacing it anyway, I'd put the files on a flash and buy new over here. That's what I did, and I'm very pleased with my MacBook replacement for the ten year old Dell.

I brought sentimental things in small proportions (photo albums, and framed pics I couldn't bear to leave), hobby items (I'm a mad sewer, quilter, crocheter, and cross-stitcher) that would be too expensive to replace here-but I gave my Singer to my DIL, and got hooked on the fabulous availability of vintage Singers over here.

Clothes, and even though you will be coming over in summer, bring woolies. Nyclon is right about the air conditioning, but coming from Dallas to London will be a bit of a shocker at first. Give yourself about two months to acclimatise, and then it will be autumn...

Nyclon also had an excellent point about cookware. I did leave most of my gear in the US (again, DIL), but I brought my 'comfort' cookbook and I am very glad I did! Delia Smith's books are inexpensive if you browse the charity shops, but my Betty Crocker came in very handy not only for the recipes, but especially for the conversion charts.

Nyclon is also spot-on about the transformers, etc-leave your appliances in the States because replacing them here is easier, much easier.

Since you are coming over with your husband on a intra-company transfer, storage of big pieces of furniture is a good option, things like books and art, etc; I'd go climate control and see if paying a year in advance will get you a discount.

I was coming over for a life time, so my son and his family had to squeeze what I didn't sell into their place, but if I had been coming over for a two year stint, I would have placed nearly everything in storage.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,064 Posts
If your computer is older and you were thinking about replacing it anyway, I'd put the files on a flash and buy new over here. That's what I did, and I'm very pleased with my MacBook replacement for the ten year old Dell.
If you use a laptop or are thinking of getting one, get it in the US. Whether Mac or PC it will definitely be cheaper in the US and you will only need a new power cord.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
If you use a laptop or are thinking of getting one, get it in the US. Whether Mac or PC it will definitely be cheaper in the US and you will only need a new power cord.
The other small thing of note, is that if you touch type, it is nice to have a US keyboard, it seems a small thing since only a few keys are different (I can't remember if any of the letters are). I found it takes me a little while to get used to the differences.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
2 questions...

1. If you did bring along a US laptop, where would you get the power cord to make it run in the UK? And would a laptop be like a PC, where you have to flip a switch to convert the voltage, or would just having the different cord be enough?

2. What did Nyclon say about air conditioning? I looked back up and couldn't find it and am just curious. I've wondered a fair amount about adjusting to climate and that interested me but then I couldn't find it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
Many laptops (such as those made by Dell) have 'world-compatible' power supplies built in and all you then need to do is purchase a cheap travel-plug adapter (the voltage range is often shown on the small cord-attached power pack). This won't be the same for desktop PCs however, and it might mean potentially buying voltage converters in addition to the adapter or swapping your PSU for a power supply marketed for the UK. PC components don't travel as nicely as laptops either, with motherboard components easily shaken loose.

Like mehemmlyn mentioned above, despite having a switchable power converter, one electrical device for a small kitchen appliance burnt out quickly. Could be coincidence, but another is being temperamental about working or not working too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Sorry about that AC thing, it was on another thread of Lovestravel's.

I did probably spend a bit more on the MacBook here than I would have in the States, but I was looking to travel light and not have to worry about dual power, etc.

As for the laptop charger cord, that's a good question. When I went over to the States last spring I brought my UK bought laptop and charger, and just used an adapter. I watched the heat in the cord, didn't have any problems so I would assume the same would be the case bringing a US laptop and gear over here.

When you get here, buy an adapter and after examining wattage info, (sorry, not terribly technical) and give it a try. Keep checking the cord for heat, which would be a sure sign of a problem.

I did see charger cords in the US in the Apple store and the clerk said it would work for my UK laptop but holy moly, Apple wanted over $60USD for it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It has been my experience with converters/adapters not working so great as well. I have had small hair styling appliances go poof on trips. My laptop seems to work well because it is designed to work dual voltage.

I wish I could bring my computer. I have a beautiful big new touch screen pc which I absolutely love. I had it fitted with a 2T drive to house all my travel photos. Unfortunately it is very large & I realized we may not have a large desk to put it on after we move. I have a couple of laptops I can bring. One smaller & one larger but neither have a hard drive large enough for all my photos. I might just have to get a portable drive to use for that.

I have a question about dvd drives on the laptop. I know that US DVDs are not compatible with UK players but is that the same case with computer drives?

I also discovered that the xbox will not work with the tvs nor will our games work with a euro xbox so we will have to buy those things when we get there.

I have already decided that even if we find a decent furnished place we will be buying our own mattress, linens & towels. It kind of creeps me out to use somebody elses stuff. :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
Most desktop PCs are dual voltage, they just need to have the cord changed out or use a grounded adapter. You can buy a standard PC cord in any computer shop in the UK for under 10GBP. They only part that is different is the wall plug; the PC plug is standardized in the countries I've seen (US/UK/FRG). Some PC power supplies are auto switching, others require you to flip a switch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
I have a question about dvd drives on the laptop. I know that US DVDs are not compatible with UK players but is that the same case with computer drives?
It does depend on individual PC drives. Mine were locked to Region 2 DVDs but they're very easy to unlock. I use this free utility: DVD Region+CSS Free - Watch & Copy Any DVD! Remove Region, CSS, ARccOS, etc.. You only need to run it once. It has allowed me to run my US, UK and Australian DVDs without further issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
It has been my experience with converters/adapters not working so great as well. I have had small hair styling appliances go poof on trips. My laptop seems to work well because it is designed to work dual voltage.

I wish I could bring my computer. I have a beautiful big new touch screen pc which I absolutely love. I had it fitted with a 2T drive to house all my travel photos. Unfortunately it is very large & I realized we may not have a large desk to put it on after we move. I have a couple of laptops I can bring. One smaller & one larger but neither have a hard drive large enough for all my photos. I might just have to get a portable drive to use for that.

I have a question about dvd drives on the laptop. I know that US DVDs are not compatible with UK players but is that the same case with computer drives?

I also discovered that the xbox will not work with the tvs nor will our games work with a euro xbox so we will have to buy those things when we get there.

I have already decided that even if we find a decent furnished place we will be buying our own mattress, linens & towels. It kind of creeps me out to use somebody elses stuff. :/
If your laptop is dual voltage (and most are). Lots (but not all) of new PC, injet printers, LCD TVs are dual voltage -you'll just need a proper adapter. DVDs: Basically, if you want to play US DVDs you will need a US DVD player and a US screen (PC/TV). All US and EU players (PC or regular) and DVDs are region coded. Some DVDs are world coded and some players are region free but they are not the norm and are rare.
Advanced: Many PC DVD players will flip or switch exactly 5 times between regions -they will then LOCK in the last position:eek:. This means every time you play a DVD with a different region the player switches to that region and the internal counter increments by 1. So 0>1>2>3>4>5. Once locked, you're stuck unless you really want to get into the workarounds. :ranger:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the info. We weren't planning to bring any dvds with us but might rent some to play on the laptop from time to time.

Does anyone know if apple tv is compatible in other regions? What about media servers? Can they connect with TVs & computers from different regions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
You could buy a blueray player for watching us DVDs. They are region free, I have just moved to new Zealand from England and blueray was the best way to go so we could play our English stuff.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top