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Work confirmed to me that my role will be relocated to the USA, Harrisburg PA. Today I live near Cambridge in the UK.

I would also have to take a USA based contract. So, what I would like forum members help with is as follows:
What are the key things I need to consider. I am 52 years old, married with 4 children, aged 15 through to 22.
Would the cost of living in the US be greater, I have noticed that services and grocery shopping appears far more than in the UK, although motor fuel is way cheaper.
Pensions
Tax
Property

HUGE questions I know so I really do appreciate any feedback and advice

Thanks

Stuart


Thanks
 

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Just to ease your mind a bit, I thought I'd mention that there are treaties between the US and UK regarding "social security" (i.e. pensions) and income tax. While not perfect, they set out rules and procedures to coordinate the government pensions on offer in each country and to avoid double taxation.

On the pensions front, each pension scheme will grant you credit for the years worked in the other country (though not for the income you earned during those years). What that means is that it's likely you'll wind up eligible for both a UK and a US pension, perhaps each one slightly reduced (for the years with no income attributed), but probably somewhat more than you might have had with only one.

You may want to see if your employer would spring for tax preparation assistance, at least for the first year or two. The US tax system takes a while to learn, but once you have a couple of years of models to follow, you may well be able to do the returns yourself or with the help of one of the many software packages on the market.

Another area to ask your employer about is the health care coverage. That is one area where the costs in the US will exceed what you are used to in the UK, simply for lack of a cohesive health insurance system. Health care is expensive and even with insurance, there is quite a maze of "co-pays" and "deductibles" and basic procedural issues to deal with (in-network vs. out of network providers, for example).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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You are aware that your kids age 21 and up are not allowed to join you in the US? And the once who are allowed to join you: one they reach 21, they are out too.
Kids 21 and up can not come on a dependent visa. They must have their own visa (as a student, for instance) and can only stay as long as that visa is valid. When they finish school (or drop out), they must leave the country or get another visa (through marriage, another study, job, ...)
 

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Work confirmed to me that my role will be relocated to the USA, Harrisburg PA. Today I live near Cambridge in the UK.

I would also have to take a USA based contract. So, what I would like forum members help with is as follows:
What are the key things I need to consider. I am 52 years old, married with 4 children, aged 15 through to 22.
Would the cost of living in the US be greater, I have noticed that services and grocery shopping appears far more than in the UK, although motor fuel is way cheaper.
Pensions
Tax
Property

HUGE questions I know so I really do appreciate any feedback and advice

Thanks

Stuart


Thanks
I used to live in York, PA and found the area and people to be very pleasant - although... I guess being German may have opened some doors that would otherwise have been closed.

Summers are warm (hot for Cambs standards) winters are cold-ish. We once had a blizzard that literally snowed us in for a week. As in, snow was halfway up the ground floor windows. We had to climb on the roof and shovel snow while it was falling because some buildings in the area had already collapsed.

loads of interesting history and culture around, too. Like Gettysburg and the Amish population with great arts and crafts and food.

Proximity to DC, New York, Philly and Baltimore didn't hurt either :)
 

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Property taxes are something that takes Brits by surprise. They are usually far higher than council tax (talking here about States that have property tax).

I found income tax and groceries are on a par with the UK, petrol (gas) obviously much cheaper, eating out cheaper, clothing somewhat cheaper, but property tax, health insurance and out of pocket expenses high.

What visa are you getting?
 

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Work confirmed to me that my role will be relocated to the USA, Harrisburg PA. Today I live near Cambridge in the UK.



I would also have to take a USA based contract...





Thanks


Cost of living is cheaper in US, things cost in dollars there what they cost in sterling in UK. Materially you will be better off.

Are your employers going to get you a green card? What about the rest of your family?

Everything electrical will need replacing.

Healthcare is the huge trap. How will you fund this once you retire? Your company will stop paying your insurance when you leave. This was why we came back.



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Healthcare is the huge trap. How will you fund this once you retire? Your company will stop paying your insurance when you leave. This was why we came back.



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The OP is 52. If he intending this as a permanent move he has plenty of time to get in his 40 quarters (approx 10 years) which will then make him and wife eligible for Medicare.

You must either have retired early or not had enough years to qualify you for Medicare.
 

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Property taxes are something that takes Brits by surprise. They are usually far higher than council tax (talking here about States that have property tax).

I found income tax and groceries are on a par with the UK, petrol (gas) obviously much cheaper, eating out cheaper, clothing somewhat cheaper, but property tax, health insurance and out of pocket expenses high.

What visa are you getting?
It bears repeating; if you are a property owner (and not a renter) then property tax MUST be considered as it is a lot of money every year.
 

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If it is a permanent move (or ten years) and you become eligible for US Social Security (40 quarters of work), you will likely be hit with the Windfall Elimination Provision because of your UK pension. The WEP kicks in when you receive a pension (in addition to SS) and you did not pay US SS on that pension. Thus, a UK pension falls into that category.
 

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The OP is 52. If he intending this as a permanent move he has plenty of time to get in his 40 quarters (approx 10 years) which will then make him and wife eligible for Medicare.



You must either have retired early or not had enough years to qualify you for Medicare.


Hi,

Yes, I did not want to commit to working another 7 years to qualify. And in any event, to my European eyes, Medicare did not look good.


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Hi,

Yes, I did not want to commit to working another 7 years to qualify. And in any event, to my European eyes, Medicare did not look good.


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Supplemented which is cheap it will beat services provided in the UK. You will be surprised to what age Americans work and for what reasons.

The main issue will be the kids. At 22 the oldest needs his/her own visa the others as well unless he gets an employer end sponsored green card while they can still be on it.
 
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