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Hi there
My husband is likely to move to Grenoble in France for work in the future. I work as a GP and forensic medical officer (like GP work, but for police) in the UK and would like to continue working in France. Does anyone have experience/knowledge of how best to go about this? My French is awful, but I'm planning in taking intensive classes, and not working for at least the first year as we have young children I'd like to settle in first. Thanks
 

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If you're already planning on taking a "sabbatical" from working for a year, I'd plan on scouting out the possibilities once you've gotten here. It will do your French a world of good (i.e. to have a "project" to research) and while you may not be able to continue in precisely the same line of work, you'll be more likely to see some new and creative possibilities based on what's around you and what your circumstances are.

I know medical professionals who have turned their qualifications into related areas - like technical writing or editing, working in insurance or for medical or pharmaceutical companies. Or sometimes a totally unique opportunity presents itself when you least expect it.

Main point is to learn the language and get out and about to meet people and get to know them. It's still pretty much the case that most jobs in France are found through "bouche à l'oreille" (word of mouth).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I've met EU people - one doctor, one dentist who set up in France. I understand there are two distinct hurdles; One is to get your qualifications (in French language too) accepted by the centre in Paris. Once done you have to meet the local committee to see if they accept you. These committees seem to be very stong and have some legal powers.

My Dutch dentist friend was advised before the TWO local interviews to emphasis that he would have the "norm" plate outside his cabinet and that he would open the same hours as other dentists in the area. A better example of anti- competition is hard to find! No consideration for the patients!

If you set up in a cabinet where you meet the public you will need an intensive course on how the securité social system works. With our local GP I am as impressed with her understanding of the many forms to use as by her clinical skills.

good luck.......DejW
 

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You will find here on page 41 (Royaume Uni):

http://www.conseil-national.medecin.fr/sites/default/files/diplomes_UE.pdf

the requirements to enable you to work in France as a medical practionner. It doesn't look too difficult, but of course speaking fluent French is vital if you wish to treat French speaking patients.

It might be a good idea to enquire at the Université de Grenoble (Faculté de Médecine) to see if you can take part in medical courses/conferences which may help you to familiarise yourself with medical practice/terminology in France.

Making friends with local GP's may also be helpful.

Good luck!
 

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I was under the impression you have to be of French nationality to practice medicine in France. The exception are those doctors working in the American Hospital in Paris which is limited to a certain number.....I think ????.

In terms of police forensics, for info the headquarters is in Ecully in Lyon (Sous-direction de la police technique et scientifique / Direction Centrale de la Police Judiciaire / Organisation - Police nationale - Ministère de l'Intérieur)

Not a million miles away from Grenoble.
 

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Interesting point Smeggie.

Certainly my Dutch dentist friend (= doctor in France) is torturing patients in France as I write this. Locally, we have doctors of Polish, Moroccan and Algerian backgrounds. I don't know if they have taken Fr nationality - rather rude to ask?

DejW

I was under the impression you have to be of French nationality to practice medicine in France. The exception are those doctors working in the American Hospital in Paris which is limited to a certain number.....I think ????.

In terms of police forensics, for info the headquarters is in Ecully in Lyon (Sous-direction de la police technique et scientifique / Direction Centrale de la Police Judiciaire / Organisation - Police nationale - Ministère de l'Intérieur)

Not a million miles away from Grenoble.
 

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I might be wrong....I usually am.

Even if your qualifications were excepted, you would have to speak near perfect French to practice medicine.....which means you would have to be born/grew up here.
 

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I think..."Does it hurt here..........?" and the patient replies aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh, yes

works in all languages!

Seriously, it think it's important to be very competent in the language (UK take note!). My Dutch dentist and Swiss (German speaking) speech therapist worked in France - both have excellent French.

DejW
 

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But Smeg (I think it was) raised another, possibly more important point - besides knowing your branch of medicine, you also have to know how the medical professions work in France. That includes understanding your interaction with the Sécu, and what practices and treatments are "covered" or not. As I understand it, many doctors here in France are opposed to the government's proposals to shift to a "single payer" model. I don't entirely understand what their objection is, but it does seem that it will throw a greater responsibility onto the doctors and their "cabinets."

However, with the OP experienced in forensic medicine, it may not be as critical to get the "doctor credential" recognized - or at least not in quite the same manner. Plus, being in an area like Grenoble (with a large university presence) there may be some possibilities in research, teaching or other variations of the art.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Have a look at this:

Working abroad

There are many non French doctors practising in France, and because of the numerus clausus (the number of medical students beinglimited to a fixed number each year) there is a lack of GPs in many areas (not the most attractive obviously but there is definitely a need).

Spoken and written French has to be very good but not perfect except in the domain of expertise of the doctor. And medical terms in any language are often easily understandable or easily acquired by someone with medical training.
 

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....aha

Learn by heart "take 2 paracetamol" = "prenez deux doliprane" - not too difficult.

Off topic joke, and I'll get my wrists slapped by Bev, but

"Why can't you buy aspirins in Aldershot (UK military town)?"

....because the paras eat 'em all.

Which, if you know anything about para training, if not far from the truth.

DejW



Have a look at this:

Working abroad

There are many non French doctors practising in France, and because of the numerus clausus (the number of medical students beinglimited to a fixed number each year) there is a lack of GPs in many areas (not the most attractive obviously but there is definitely a need).

Spoken and written French has to be very good but not perfect except in the domain of expertise of the doctor. And medical terms in any language are often easily understandable or easily acquired by someone with medical training.
 

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And don't you love the name of the echographist on the list of French docs in London? - Dr Cockenpot (I hope he'll forgive me) - French equivalent of a bun in the oven or as the French Canadians say une polichinelle dans le tiroir? :preggers:
 

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resounding echo, pregnant pause..........oh!. ..... Perhaps it's a misconception?

D

And don't you love the name of the echographist on the list of French docs in London? - Dr Cockenpot (I hope he'll forgive me) - French equivalent of a bun in the oven or as the French Canadians say une polichinelle dans le tiroir? :preggers:
 

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I think..."Does it hurt here..........?" and the patient replies aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh, yes

works in all languages!

Seriously, it think it's important to be very competent in the language (UK take note!). My Dutch dentist and Swiss (German speaking) speech therapist worked in France - both have excellent French.

DejW
You're not kidding, DejW.

I had to 'laugh' when one of the UK political parties proudly announced last week that they were going to bring in minimum standards of English for all NHS staff.

Joking aside, there have already been fatalities through language-error.
 

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Frankly, and as Verite states, there is a shortage of GPs in many areas - there is also a shortage of doctors prepared to do after-hours or prepared/able to visit patients at home, and there is always a shortage of doctors in hospital emergency. So as long as you get on top of the language, and are not too picky about location/hours of work, you should be able to find employment (eg. if you were prepared to work weekends, act as a locum, or set up a practice in a village not too far from Grenoble etc etc etc etc). Not sure about the forensic work - suggest you do some research, but Grenoble I think is relatively well located for this (Lyon might be better). That said, you might be able to work with one of the fly-in fly-out teams that deal with major incidents (subject, of course, to qualification).
 

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BTW, most GPs here do their own paperwork, take their own phone calls, and don't employ a secretary. Doctors also don't earn much, relatively speaking.
The issue they have with tiers payants proposals is (1) more paperwork and (2) concerns about having to wait several months for payment from the mutuelles. In addition, there are literally hundreds of mutuelles in France which in itself is cause for concern for doctors.
 

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I would think the other big "risk" they seem to be asking the doctors to take on is keeping track of whether or not their patients even have a mutuelle. I don't see why the sécu wouldn't continue to handle the task of passing on the payment requests to the mutuelle as they now do. But for patients without a mutuelle, the doctor could wind up getting stiffed for a portion of the fees.

Unless, of course, the government wants to make mutuelle coverage mandatory.... (and from some information I just received from our insurer, it seems that that will soon be the case for the employers). Anyhow, it's just this sort of thing that makes it just that much more difficult for a foreigner who wants to practice medicine here in France.

There are plenty of medicine-related occupations the OP may be able to look into that wouldn't require going through the full process of having foreign credentials validated to practice here in France. And forensic medicine is very likely to be one of those possibilities.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Not sure about forensic medicine being understaffed. There are certain areas where women doctors occupy a majority of jobs because they are often 'family friendly', ie with office hours (school doctors, social security doctors, doctors for the different administrations needing medical examinations) and forensic medicine seems to fall into this category.

So these jobs are highly sought-after by women doctors with families as they are able to juggle career/children/home. :confused2:

What's more, the modern popularity of books, films and tv series devoted to this speciality has increased the interest in this otherwise marginal medical activity.

http://www.chu-grenoble.fr/content/medecine-legale
 
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