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I'm eying a move to Queretaro to teach English at a private elementary school there. The school has never hired a foreigner, so they aren't sure about the process and are looking into it. I'm wondering if someone else can give me the information about the process so that I'm well-informed from the start.

What's the name of the visa? (Is it FM3?)
What does an employer need to do?
What are the employee's responsibilities?
What are the costs for the employer and employee?
Is there a waiting period?
At what part of the hiring process do I need to seek the visa?

Thanks!
 

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You will need an FM3 with specific working permission for the job you take, including the location. That means that the employer will have to agree to hire you and describe the duties of your position for 'Inmigracion'. You will probably have to bear the cost of the process of application for the FM3, but that is quite normal unless you were being hired by a large foreign company, or being transferred by one. You might expect the process to take anywhere from a few days (in a state capital) to a month. You should probably ask the employer to accompany you to your first interview with INM, although that isn't a necessity; especially if you speak Spanish. There is an FM3 category for 'Visitante Profesional' which should include one with teaching credentials.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You will need an FM3 with specific working permission for the job you take, including the location. That means that the employer will have to agree to hire you and describe the duties of your position for 'Inmigracion'. You will probably have to bear the cost of the process of application for the FM3, but that is quite normal unless you were being hired by a large foreign company, or being transferred by one. You might expect the process to take anywhere from a few days (in a state capital) to a month. You should probably ask the employer to accompany you to your first interview with INM, although that isn't a necessity; especially if you speak Spanish. There is an FM3 category for 'Visitante Profesional' which should include one with teaching credentials.
Perfect - that's so helpful. I also read online that you can go to Mexican consulates in the US to get the FM3 visa, but then you have to register it once you arrive in Mexico. If I got all the documents from the employer, would you recommend doing that? I live in Houston and there's a consulate here, so the location would be easy. I remember that when I went as a student, there were extra fees for registering it and getting it first in the US ended up more expensive. Either way, the visa fees aren't that much (under $200), so I can deal :)

Also - what's the deal on taxes? I've heard that you pay double taxes on your income, but I've also heard that you pay the full taxes on your income to the country you're living in, and then if the US tax level is any higher, then you pay the remaining taxes to the US. I'm just curious so that I can be thinking about those expenses ahead of time. I imagine I would get a lot more info from the American embassy once I start working - but it's nice to know at least the basics beforehand.
 

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work visa..

you should get your fm3 in houston..... because when you travel down here you will have an fmt issued (tourist visa) and the fm3 takes about 45 days..... wich means you cant legally work.. and if there is someone thats aware of your fmt- they can call authorities and have you deported for working illegally.


your future place of work needs to email/fax a work offer letter that you take to the mexican office in houston. the process in houston will be 2 visits in less then 14 days and as long as you have everything you need in order.
 

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Yes, you will have to register your FM3 within 30 days of crossing the border. You will need proof of your Mexican address. A copy of your lease, etc.
The USA and Mexico have tax treaties, so you won't be taxed twice. Check with your consulate for details.
 
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