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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

Me and my current roommate are both form the US and we are planning on moving to Florence to teach ESL. We have done a fair share of research and realized that working in the EU is not going to be easy but we are determined. We were informed that Florence is a great place to work, as well as truely gain the italian experience. Does anyone have any suggestions on schools that are hiring ESL teachers?
Also, what are your recommendations on places to live within Florence? Any websites that would help would be great.

Thanks for the help!
 

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You won't find a single language school in Florence or anywhere else in Italy that will go through the work permit procedure to hire a non-EU ESL teacher. There are tons of well-qualified, experienced language teachers from UK, Ireland and elsewhere in EU to choose from, plus those who don't require a work permit because of long residence or marriage to an EU national. Moreover, as they can't demonstrate a shortage of qualified applicants, no work permit will be issued. There may be a dodgy establishment that will hire an American without a visa, but I doubt it, as penalty for employing an illegal is high and the authorities are really clamping down on it. You may advertise your services for a private tuition while you are staying visa-free for 3 months, but apart from being illegal you won't make enough even to pay your bills, as there's a a lot of competition.
If you are really keen to teach English, choose your destination outside of EU, such as Russia, Ukraine or beyond Europe, where there is a steady demand for teachers, and where being an American isn't a drawback for visa and work permit.
Dave's ESL Cafe is a good website for ESL teachers and jobs.
 

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You CAN find work in Florence

I wanted so bad to move to Florence after I studied abroad here and after going home and doing research I was overwhelmed by all of the negativity of the expats I looked to for advice. They had all been married or had Italian heritage or their company sent them here and couldn't fathom that it could be done any other way. After 5 years of doing nothing I finally I just stopped listening to everyone else and just tried it. It's been six years and although it's sometimes been a struggle I love living in Florence and made my own path while doing it. And knowing how great it has been for me to have an experience abroad I started my blog to help others find their own path too. You can search for movingtoflorence on blogspot to find it.
I wish you all the luck in the world and know that you'll never know what can happen until you try:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Flobugg

After reading the first post I was starting to get a little concerned. But after reading you post I am reaffirmed that this is the right thing to do. I have lived in other countries before, so having to hustle for a job in not out of the norm for me. I got a hold of your blog and I love it. It has already been so very helpful, and I will be referencing it over the next few months. It sounds like San Lorenzo is the place to be if you are use to living in a metro area here in the US. The links you gave for apts was very helpful too.
I can't say enough about your blog, I really find it to be my holy grail right now. My friend and I will have to meet up with you in Florence so we can return the favor with some drinks or dinner. Thanks again!
 

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I'd take what is posted on movingtoflorence with a large pinch of salt. It says that illegal immigrants from US and Canada are routinely ignored by the authorities, as they are after the bigger fish from the Third World. That's is not so, and I urge you not to go down this route (working without a legal work visa - very hard to obtain for US citizens), as authorities are clamping down on it - there have been numerous recent stories of the police doing random ID check in Italian cities and rounding up anyone with illegal or insuffient documentation. If you are deported, you will be banned, not just from Italy but other Schengen states for up to 10 years.
 

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My posts also very clearly state the risk that you take and is specific to Florence. I wouldn't personally suggest anyone taking that route in Milan because I know that they are much more strict but my assessment of Florence after coming here for the last 12 years and living here for 6 is what I wrote , the pros and cons, the legality and the holes you can use to your advantage. I wanted to start my blog to give people an overall view of all their options and let them decide what risk they want to take
 

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My posts also very clearly state the risk that you take and is specific to Florence. I wouldn't personally suggest anyone taking that route in Milan because I know that they are much more strict but my assessment of Florence after coming here for the last 12 years and living here for 6 is what I wrote , the pros and cons, the legality and the holes you can use to your advantage. I wanted to start my blog to give people an overall view of all their options and let them decide what risk they want to take
Fair enough, I just didn't want people to think they can just come in, mingle with student and tourist crowds and get an illegal work without any consequences. Your warning is very timely, as in the current recession, the authorities everywhere are clamping down hard on the black market in order to release more jobs for locals and others entitled to work there.
 
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