Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
cuerno - in Mexico, a device fitted on cars used exclusively to signal following drivers that you are not causing the delay, literally, "horn".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I dunno, I was depending on google translate - I tried "automobile horn" and that's what it gave me. Then to try to make sure I reverse translated cuerno and it gave me this:

Translations of cuerno:

horn: claxon, cuerno, bocina, asta, trompa, antena
antler: cuerno, mogote
cusp: cúspide, corona, cuerno
croissant: cuerno

It was mostly sarcasm on how Mexican drivers utterly ignore horns being blown at them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,446 Posts
Car horn not automobile horn becomes "bocina". You have to play around with Google Translator to get it correct at times. I don´t take the first translation it gives me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
It was mostly sarcasm on how Mexican drivers utterly ignore horns being blown at them.
So, what are turn signals used for? Emergency flashers seem to be used for everything. When the driver in front of me turns on the flashers, I am prepared for anything including a turn either to the right or left.
 

·
Super Moderator
Guadalajara, México
Joined
·
7,055 Posts
So, what are turn signals used for? Emergency flashers seem to be used for everything. When the driver in front of me turns on the flashers, I am prepared for anything including a turn either to the right or left.
On the highways you have to be careful with left turn signals. It can mean either: they are going to make a left turn; or, it is safe to pass them on the left.

However, on the positive side, Mexican drivers are far better at keeping to the right except to pass. That is a concept that seems totally lost in the US where drivers just drive in any lane at any speed.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,995 Posts
I dunno, I was depending on google translate - I tried "automobile horn" and that's what it gave me. Then to try to make sure I reverse translated cuerno and it gave me this:

Translations of cuerno:

horn: claxon, cuerno, bocina, asta, trompa, antena
antler: cuerno, mogote
cusp: cúspide, corona, cuerno
croissant: cuerno

It was mostly sarcasm on how Mexican drivers utterly ignore horns being blown at them.
I don't use Google translate but instead rely on online dictionaries whose accuracy I trust and which indicate which words are used in Spain, Mexico and so on. Does Google do this? Here's an example: http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/horn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
Agree with answers above:

automobile horn: "bocina" or "claxon"

cuerno:
1. horn or antler on an animal
2. croissant shaped bread
3. a type of musical instrument (similar to "horn" in English in this context)
4. if someone "puts the horns" on their partner (poner los cuernos a ...) - they were unfaithful
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Everyone I know here uses "claxon" for the car horn and "cuerno" for either a croissant or else as a metaphor for anger -- "su puso de cuernos"
"poner los cuernos" is a metaphor for a woman that cuckholds her husband. She put the horns on him.

There was a very popular song a few years back called "El Venao" by a group from Puerto Rico. Venao is a mispronunciation of "venado" or a buck deer. The lyrics deal with "poner los cuernos". The venado of course has a large set of antlers or "cuernos" in Spanish and is a metaphor for a cuckhold. I am unable to post a link to the video because of a lack of posts but the video is about a woman cuckholding her husband.

Catchy little tune!

"Que no me digan en la esquina "el venao" por que eso si me mortifica! El venao, el venao"."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
However, on the positive side, Mexican drivers are far better at keeping to the right except to pass. That is a concept that seems totally lost in the US where drivers just drive in any lane at any speed.
I have found this to be quite the opposite and over many years I have literally driven hundreds of thousands of km on Mexican roads and highways.

I guess YMMV would be an apt pun in this case!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,751 Posts
I agree with TundraGreen 100 % .. of course they also pass in curves and in areas with no visibility as well so they are equally bad drivers..
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,995 Posts
There was a very popular song a few years back called "El Venao" by a group from Puerto Rico. Venao is a mispronunciation of "venado" or a buck deer.
Catchy little tune!
It's not really a mispronunciation, but rather a feature of certain dialects of Spanish, which omit the "d" sound between vowels, especially at the ends of words, such as "venado".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
It's not really a mispronunciation, but rather a feature of certain dialects of Spanish, which omit the "d" sound between vowels, especially at the ends of words, such as "venado".
How about phonetically incorrect? Do you consider "puelto lico" a feature of the boricua dialect or mispronunciation? Or "Nueva Yol" a feature of dominican dialect? Caribbean dialects are famous for omitting certain letters. Here in Mexico "onde" is a common pronunciation of the word "donde". One will commonly hear "on 'sta?" for "donde està". Of course there are many other examples of both regional dialects and pronunciation. Many of which swallow certain sounds.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,995 Posts
How about phonetically incorrect? Do you consider "puelto lico" a feature of the boricua dialect or mispronunciation? Or "Nueva Yol" a feature of dominican dialect? Caribbean dialects are famous for omitting certain letters. Here in Mexico "onde" is a common pronunciation of the word "donde". One will commonly hear "on 'sta?" for "donde està". Of course there are many other examples of both regional dialects and pronunciation. Many of which swallow certain sounds.
Incorrect according to which authority? I doubt that modern-day linguists would call these variants incorrect, just variations on a theme.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Incorrect according to which authority? I doubt that modern-day linguists would call these variants incorrect, just variations on a theme.
No problem. I was simply trying to explain the different spelling for readers who may not be familiar with the different dialects of Spanish. If I mischaracterized it I apologize to all the linguists on the forum.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top