Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are looking to do a bit wild camping next year October time . Any advice please.

We are very clean campers ie always take rubbish away with us and will be using a gas stove so hopefully less risk of fires. We do a lot of walking and regarding rubbish can't believe the amount of stuff just chucked out of probably car windows.

I know it's probably illegal to wild camp but a lot of other things in Spain are illegal but still gets done. Anyone done any wild camping and any tips will be grateful thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
This seems odd to me, I think it is illegal to wild camp but the idea of turning up to a manicured campsite with facilities is my idea of hell.

Surely there are areas on lakes or rivers that you can camp for a few nights, even if you had to pay to do so.
That's all I want anyway, there are probably some fishing properties that will allow you to bivvy it overnight but that's hardly a family weekend away.

Then again lots of the reports of clamping down on "Wild Camping" I have read are about motor homes pulling up on the side of the road. Hardly camping or wild if you ask me. I can't figure out camping in Europe.

The other thing is it will most likely depend on the region to what the law is.
Still I'm interested in any suggestions people have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,566 Posts
"Wild Camping" is surely only on publicly owned land that has no restriction on camping.

Very little land in Spain is in the public domain. Nearly everything is "owned" by someone or some organisation. Spaniards are very possessive of every bit of land they own. This is mostly because most of Spain was (and, to some extent, still is) in the hands of the major land-owners and this goes back to the times of the Visigothic kings. Any land that nowadays has moved back into the hands of the 'small person' is jealously guarded against any intrusion. If you camp on somebody's property without permission, you are quite likely to find the Guardia Civil breathing down your neck and your ending up in the carcel and your tent/mobile caravan or whatever confiscated pending destruction - this is likely to occur just before the local justices manage to get around to hearing your case and declare that since you were foreigners and not likely to know better, you may be released on payment of a fine and may have your property back (whoops! too late, oh dear lo siento, pero....).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,399 Posts
Here is a list of places where you can do "acampada libre", or at least something close to it.

Cómo conocer las zonas de acampada libre en España
Those aren't really 'wild' campng suites, though, are they...I may have read incorrectly but I thought they were 'primitive' but nevertheless licensed and organised camping sites.

I guess it's sad but true, as Baldy says, that there are very few areas of land that are not someone or other's property. I remember back to 1990 when the people of the then Czechoslovakia were after over forty years permitted to travel freely. My friend's teenage son and daughter, now thinking that as West = Freedom, took sleepingbags and very little money and went on a tour of Europe, visiting all the places they'd only been able to read about under socialism.
They got a rude awakening to the harsh realities of Western life when they were kicked off beaches and out of copses where they were sleeping and told to stop eating packed lunches in St. Mark's Square and other tourist landmarks.
They soon learnt the all-important lesson that western 'freedom' nearly always has a pricetag attached.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,467 Posts
Here is a list of places where you can do "acampada libre", or at least something close to it.

Cómo conocer las zonas de acampada libre en España
Cut and paste from another recent thread. Same link as Alcalaina's Look at the translated bit in blue

Actually, in Spain areas of "Free" camping are very much restricted. I don't know about France.
Here it depends on the Comunidad Autonoma, but in many it's totally prohibited and would be a prime way for the OP to fall foul of the law, get picked up and moved on. One reason is to protect country side from fire which is a real risk in Spain even in the winter, and also just to protect areas from environmental damage in general by walking off the path, leaving rubbish, etc.
Cómo conocer las zonas de acampada libre en España

Actualmente, las zonas de acampada en España se están restringiendo mucho debido a la legislación que regula este tipo de instalaciones. De esta manera, son pocas las zona de acampada libre que quedan en el territorio español, incluso está totalmente prohibido acampar en algunas comunidades autónomas, (few "free camping areas" remain in Spain and it is even totally prohibited in some Comunidades.) ya que son los gobiernos autonómicos quien determinan las leyes en materia de acampada. Si quieres hacer una salida a la naturaleza y pasar la noche en tiendas de campaña, es totalmente necesario que conozcas las zonas habilitadas para ello, ya que de lo contrario estarás infringiendo la ley y podrás ser sancionado por los agentes rurales.

From this thread
http://www.expatforum.com/expats/spain-expat-forum-expats-living-spain/181433-great-escape.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
You need to know that in most of Spain it is illegal to light any type of fire whatsoever out in the countryside. This is not one of those laws that is overlooked. It is heavily prosecuted and fined because there is such a problem with forest fires here. Generally speaking you can only use fire during periods of low risk for forest fires (winter months) and only if it's used in places that are specifically designed for it, like campgrounds and cookout areas. Each region establishes when the low risk times are, depending on the weather.

And I agree, there's very little land out there that isn't someone's. You very easily could find a hunting rifle pointed your way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,467 Posts
Well that's that firmly knocked on the head.
I'm sure there are places where wild camping goes on. You just need to be sure about it before you set up your tent.
I'd be worried about the hunting aspect as I have wandered into hunting grounds before on walks - and they don't like it!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Now, if you were to go to Gran Canaria there are in fact state owned sites that are free. These are not talked about as the locals like them. They are often in the Mountains with good but basic facilities.

If you use chrome browser it will translate this page into English
Acampadas, Albergues y Áreas Recreativas - OIAC: Oficina de Información y Atención al Ciudadano del Cabildo de Gran Canaria

The link is from this article in The Guardian
Camping on Gran Canaria | Travel | The Guardian

You do need permits but you can apply in advance. The mountains are lovely and go up to about 2000m
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,057 Posts
Those aren't really 'wild' campng suites, though, are they...I may have read incorrectly but I thought they were 'primitive' but nevertheless licensed and organised camping sites.
That's right. As others have said, truly"wild" camping is illegal.

I think the main reason is the risk of fires. Every year there are hundred of fires due to campfires and barbecues not being put out properly.

Then there is the problem of hunting, which is very profitable for landowners. The two activities aren't exactly compatible!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,566 Posts
What about places like iznahar or negratin or other lakes @ least the risk of fires will be far less.
you are still stuck with the problem of "Whose property is it?"

Of course, if you want to tun the risk of either getting shotgun pellets in your backside or all your camping gear confiscated (permanently!) it is up to you. It is against forum rules for us to tell you how to break the law or to encourage you to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
What about places like iznahar or negratin or other lakes @ least the risk of fires will be far less.
I think the fire thing is a bit overblown, you don't need a fire to go camping. Fire Bans are there for a very good reason but to say you can't go camping because of a fire risk is a bit much in my opinion. I'm sure it is used as a reason but I think the other reasons are more the likely culprit.
I grew up in the driest state on the driest continent and if there was a fire ban it wouldn't stop you from camping, you just wouldn't have a campfire. It's not a big deal when the temps are hot anyway.

I've spent half the afternoon looking for a campsite whether wild or on private land that would be what I'm looking for and I haven't had much success. My lack of Spanish might not be helping. Plenty of yurts and glamping though which shows the business model can work, there's an idea for someone.
It's like everything here though, ask a different person get a different answer.
I did find something saying in the Sierra Nevadas you can camp for one night only but must have camp pulled an hour after sunrise and on public land not private with a whole host of different rules.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,037 Posts
We have friends who come most years in there motorhome. They wander about for 3 or 4 months & very rarely use official campsite. In fact where we arealong the coast in winter most bays ,coves , woodded beach areas are packed with motorhomes. tey do occasionally get moved n but it isn't often. In Águilas they are allowed to park overnight on the fishing harbour quayside, except in february when the fiesta is on.

Actually I was on a Spanish motor caravanners site last week & one of the main complaints being addressed was the hostility they are met with in many areas even extending to illegal signs stating 'no motorhomes allowed'.

la realidad de una autocaravana camper furgoneta camping camperesquinieve www.camperesquinieve.net (Autocaravanas nuestras rutas Areas Anuncios Informacion Caravanas carros tienda movilhomes camper accesorios)
Various laws & distances allowed from beach etc; explained.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,057 Posts
I think the fire thing is a bit overblown, you don't need a fire to go camping. Fire Bans are there for a very good reason but to say you can't go camping because of a fire risk is a bit much in my opinion. I'm sure it is used as a reason but I think the other reasons are more the likely culprit.
I grew up in the driest state on the driest continent and if there was a fire ban it wouldn't stop you from camping, you just wouldn't have a campfire. It's not a big deal when the temps are hot anyway.
Maybe so but sadly even when there are fire bans people still have BBQs and throw cigarette ends out of car windows. The fire that destroyed 2,000 ha of forest in Mallorca last month was caused by someone not putting out their BBQ properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,399 Posts
That's right. As others have said, truly"wild" camping is illegal.

I think the main reason is the risk of fires. Every year there are hundred of fires due to campfires and barbecues not being put out properly.

Then there is the problem of hunting, which is very profitable for landowners. The two activities aren't exactly compatible!
I couldn't help thinking about Canada and comparing. My cousins are intrepid outdoor types and every year go wild camping in the Algonquin (not sure of spelling) National Park which isn't much less in area than England. They take sleeping bags, canoes which they carry from lake to lake, sufficient dry food and catch fish and collect food from berries and plants.
Canadians seem to like that sort of thing. You don't often hear of fires started in such places as the wild campers seem on the whole a sensible, responsible bunch.

I laughed one year when we were off to stay with my cousins...They suggested Sandra and I jointhem on an expedition. Sandra, who cannot leave the house without having showered, put on freshly washed and ironed clothes, done her hair and put on her make-up, a somewhat lengthy procedure, paled at even the thought.

We did not go with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
Maybe so but sadly even when there are fire bans people still have BBQs and throw cigarette ends out of car windows. The fire that destroyed 2,000 ha of forest in Mallorca last month was caused by someone not putting out their BBQ properly.
Well as sad as that is it's more a matter of fire safety and education and has nothing to do with camping.
If it's a high risk day then you shouldn't be having a BBQ at all. Even those portable gas cookers should be a no-no outdoors.

I couldn't help thinking about Canada and comparing. My cousins are intrepid outdoor types and every year go wild camping in the Algonquin (not sure of spelling) National Park which isn't much less in area than England. They take sleeping bags, canoes which they carry from lake to lake, sufficient dry food and catch fish and collect food from berries and plants.
Canadians seem to like that sort of thing. You don't often hear of fires started in such places as the wild campers seem on the whole a sensible, responsible bunch.
This is true, much similar to Australia which is why I find it hard not to be able to find proper camping. That's something I don't want my kids to miss out on.

As a side years ago when we were in Canada we spent a week in a cabin in Algonquin and planned on doing just that sort of thing. We took the boat with our tents to an island, set up camp ready for everyone to come the next day but in the morning on checking the camp it had been destroyed by a bear.
We stayed in the cabin.

I'd take snakes and spiders any day over bears, mountain lions and sasquatch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,057 Posts
Well as sad as that is it's more a matter of fire safety and education and has nothing to do with camping.
If it's a high risk day then you shouldn't be having a BBQ at all. Even those portable gas cookers should be a no-no outdoors.
Look, you can educate people and put up signs and warnings s till you're blue in the face but you will never stop people from being careless, especially after a few beers. The only way, sadly, is a blanket ban.

There is a strong belief amongst people where I live that countryside rightly belongs to them, and if they want to light a fire they will. They hate rules and regulations. I'm sure the same attitude prevails in other parts of Spain.

We used to camp in the New Forest when I was little (1950s), you just picked up a permit from the warden and you could camp anywhere for free. I remember my dad cooking wild mushrooms over a camp fire. We had to go to the pub and buy a packet of crisps to get the blue bag of salt!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
A blanket ban on fire, yes. It's pretty much what I said.

But you can't ban people from leaving their houses, the politics of whose land is whose is really meaningless in this instance. If they want to light a fire then it's up to the authorities to enforce it. To hell with what people think about rules, a few prison sentences and unaffordable fines will at least make people think first. If not then string them up.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top