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I apologize if this has been bantered around in other posts. I attempted a search, but could not find a specific enough key word to produce any hits. If you have a line to previous posts, I would love to see them. The initial bio, which posters do an excellent job of contributing to, seems to stop short, at least most of them, in pointing out why we are here.

Recent posts have indicated that some forum users left the US because of the political climate, societal decline, etc. Some seem to almost be in a position of embracing the term "expat" because of their happiness to leave the states.

I choose to believe that the majority of the forum members are quite happy that they were born in the greatest nation the world has yet produced, but that they are the type of people who will live until they die. They will not hunker down in a calm, serene corner and wait out the remaining years of life. I don't mean to trample on anyone's personal creed, and if you are here because of a dislike of the US, then I hope you are indeed happier here. Personally, I don't care for the term expatriot, but I do understand that it is not to be taken literally, so I have swallowed my resistance to the use of the word.

My personal reason for the jump is that my dear wife left the country of her birth, Mexico, and spent 10 years with me in the sometimes brutal climate of Alaska, far away from family, friends, familiar culture, and all things she had taken comfort in for the first ~50 years of her life. She deserves a return to her roots, and I am happy that I can provide one. I am quite happy here also, and have no plans of returning to the US, unless something forces such a move, and, at the moment, I really don't know what that could be.

I struggled to make this post as generic as possible, and apologize if it is interpreted as inflammatory; that was not the intent. I have seen a great many posts that have berated the US, and felt a call to post that anti-US sentiment is definitely not why I am here.
 

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:) 'Fess up'. You were just tired of living in that ex-Russian purchase and started to feel the cold. La Señora has told you of the warmth of the Mexican people, the fresh and delicious foods, the nine day fiestas every ten days, and the warm weather; even the lack of furnaces or AC in most homes. So, you may become a true expatriate (not the word you used & didn't like) after all.
Many US 'expats' have spent much of their adult lives outside of the USA, as I have. When that is the case, it is always difficult to 'go back' to a place that has gone into such decline since the 1970s. It does feel like 'culture shock' to go 'home'. I guess we've learned to appreciate places where life is more 'real', more authentic, where folks still smile and really do have 'family values' that mean something. Mexico is that kind of place. There are others, but Mexico is close, drive-able and has the best climate choices and economical advantages. I hope you are discovering all of that in your new home in Querétaro. Learning the language and culture will help you to adjust and make living a lot more enjoyable. ¡Buena suerte!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:) 'Fess up'. You were just tired of living in that ex-Russian purchase and started to feel the cold. La Señora has told you of the warmth of the Mexican people, the fresh and delicious foods, the nine day fiestas every ten days, and the warm weather; even the lack of furnaces or AC in most homes. So, you may become a true expatriate (not the word you used & didn't like) after all.
Many US 'expats' have spent much of their adult lives outside of the USA, as I have. When that is the case, it is always difficult to 'go back' to a place that has gone into such decline since the 1970s. It does feel like 'culture shock' to go 'home'. I guess we've learned to appreciate places where life is more 'real', more authentic, where folks still smile and really do have 'family values' that mean something. Mexico is that kind of place. There are others, but Mexico is close, drive-able and has the best climate choices and economical advantages. I hope you are discovering all of that in your new home in Querétaro. Learning the language and culture will help you to adjust and make living a lot more enjoyable. ¡Buena suerte!
You shall forever be enshrined on my list of those who, "In a pleasant way, point out my ignorance". Thank you so much for the English lesson, and I'm not being facetious. I have always assumed (yes, I know what a breakdown of assume produces) that the word was expatriot, thus my dislike. Also, I do dearly love the Mexican experience, but I do not have to dislike the US to do so. A perfect night's entertainment for me is to show up on the Qto centro plaza on a pleasant summer evening, have a nice cup of coffee, and just sit and enjoy the activity. I do agree that scenes of such social grandeur are becoming more and more infrequent in the states, but just because my country is less than it once was, I am not inclined to berate it as a place that I am happy to be clear of.
 

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I apologize if this has been bantered around in other posts. I attempted a search, but could not find a specific enough key word to produce any hits. If you have a line to previous posts, I would love to see them. The initial bio, which posters do an excellent job of contributing to, seems to stop short, at least most of them, in pointing out why we are here.

Recent posts have indicated that some forum users left the US because of the political climate, societal decline, etc. Some seem to almost be in a position of embracing the term "expat" because of their happiness to leave the states.

I choose to believe that the majority of the forum members are quite happy that they were born in the greatest nation the world has yet produced, but that they are the type of people who will live until they die. They will not hunker down in a calm, serene corner and wait out the remaining years of life. I don't mean to trample on anyone's personal creed, and if you are here because of a dislike of the US, then I hope you are indeed happier here. Personally, I don't care for the term expatriot, but I do understand that it is not to be taken literally, so I have swallowed my resistance to the use of the word.

My personal reason for the jump is that my dear wife left the country of her birth, Mexico, and spent 10 years with me in the sometimes brutal climate of Alaska, far away from family, friends, familiar culture, and all things she had taken comfort in for the first ~50 years of her life. She deserves a return to her roots, and I am happy that I can provide one. I am quite happy here also, and have no plans of returning to the US, unless something forces such a move, and, at the moment, I really don't know what that could be.

I struggled to make this post as generic as possible, and apologize if it is interpreted as inflammatory; that was not the intent. I have seen a great many posts that have berated the US, and felt a call to post that anti-US sentiment is definitely not why I am here.
I think there are two different groups of Expats living full or part time in Mexico and that makes for two very different motivations. Group one is those with spouses or ex spouses from Mexico or Mexican Americans. Group two is those that do not.

For me group two has a different motivation than group one. RV seems to be saying many from group two are travellers that ended up in Mexico. Also there are members of group two that are not traveller but moved for economic/climatic/social reasons to Mexico.

I could be wrong. Generalizations usually don t do much for everyone. LOL
 
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People come to MX for many reasons, and many foreigners leave too.

I came here for work reasons, and the move was not really my decision. Now that I'm retired, I guess I choose to ask myself "Why do I stay?"

Of all of the places I have lived, my small corner here in MX is most like the place in the US where I grew up (or maybe it's just warm or distorted memories of Mayberry). It's quiet; neighbors still know, help and respect each other; people here are friendly, mostly honest and family oriented instead of being intensely focused on work, money and "getting ahead"; kids can play and be safe; affordable good bilingual schools; excellent medical care without a bunch of paperwork and waiting, and at a reasonable cost; and the local streets kind of roll up by 9 pm (although the last one is changing bit by bit now).

For foreign people who move to and then leave MX, I would venture a guess that only a few factors come into play:

-Communication failures because newcomers don't learn Spanish after convincing themselves that they can't or don't need to learn a bit of everyday Spanish (I didn't until I was in my 40's and continue to learn. Life in MX is much richer, more interesting and much cheaper when you can communicate). One CAN do it, and it's worth doing;

-unwillingness or inability to adapt culturally which can lead to clashes or anger;

-medical problems that they choose to deal with somewhere else:

-money problems;

-poor choice of where to live in MX, and the resulting fallout;

-family needs (in their home country) that need to be addressed, such as an older parent who is unable to care for themselves, can't or won't come to live with them in MX and doesn't want to go into an old age facility

-or a spouse encountering one or more of the same problems who make their life intolerable.
 

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My personal reason for the jump is that my dear wife left the country of her birth, Mexico, and spent 10 years with me in the sometimes brutal climate of Alaska, far away from family, friends, familiar culture, and all things she had taken comfort in for the first ~50 years of her life. She deserves a return to her roots, and I am happy that I can provide one. I am quite happy here also, and have no plans of returning to the US, unless something forces such a move, and, at the moment, I really don't know what that could be.
I commend you for your personal reason for moving. Most successful marriages are based on both being: good forgivers, good givers, compromisers - always taking the other persons needs into consideration. When both do that you have a successful and enduring marriage. I speak from experience having been married for 47 years.

The fact that your wife made such a drastic change in climate, culture, etc. (especially later in life) for the marriage says much and the fact that you recognize her sacrifice and felt that it would be fair to make a move to primarily return her to her roots says much about your character. The fact that you now enjoy Mexico and develop a love for it is a side benefit of your initial consideration for your wife.

I congratulate you. If more married people manifested these traits we wouldn't have a 50% +/- divorce rate in many countries.
 

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Before coming to Mexico, I had traveled all over the world. But the trips were mostly short, the longest trips were a month in Spain and a year in Vietnam. I had never lived in any country besides the US. Then the Peace Corps sent me to Mexico for two years. After my first year here, I decided not to go back. The climate, culture and life style all appealed to me very much. But I think the real deciding factors were two: I really enjoy the challenge of learning Spanish and didn't want to lose that. And, I like the fact that I can walk to almost everything, and that there are frequent buses to anything further away.
 

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I retired on a limited budget that probably would have required a 1 room apartment in the US. Here I built a house and am living in it

I got tired of the Seattle weather ... especially since I was born and raised in Calif

Nothing in the US is like it was in the 50's, 60's and 70's when I really enjoyed it ... both cultural and cost changes.

I used to enjoy driving in the country in most western states and finding small authentic towns where people were real and cost reasonable. Since sometime in the 90's all those places have become "yuppified" to the point of being unrecognizable and unaffordable.

Not only is it an adventure to keep me awake in my later years ... but an affordable one. At least I don't have to put on an orange bib and work at Home Depot to supplement my income.
 

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I think there are two different groups of Expats living full or part time in Mexico and that makes for two very different motivations. Group one is those with spouses or ex spouses from Mexico or Mexican Americans. Group two is those that do not.

For me group two has a different motivation than group one. RV seems to be saying many from group two are travellers that ended up in Mexico. Also there are members of group two that are not traveller but moved for economic/climatic/social reasons to Mexico.

I could be wrong. Generalizations usually don t do much for everyone. LOL
Maybe I belong in Group 3! I don't have a Mexican spouse and am not a traveler who just happened to end up here. I was a Spanish major in college and first came here for a summer while still a student to immerse myself in Mexican language and culture. Since then I have returned many times, sometimes to live and work for awhile, sometimes on extended vacations. When it came time to retire a few years ago, it seemed only logical to move back to Mexico, where I had friends and felt very much at home. And, yes, where my modest pension would allow to live much more comfortably than they would have back in the States.

Thanks for starting this thread, Ken!
 

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Why are we going?

To all of my fellow respondents who are already in Mexico, I present a perspective from one who is chomping at the bit to get there.

I am a proud American - I love this country - it has been good to me and my family. And I cry for my beloved country, that it has become a land of rich and poor and people in the middle are finding it increasingly not the place they grew up in. [this is not a political statement - it is a gut feeling]

But, "fixed incomehood" makes one re-evalutate. I do not much care why it has happened, there was nothing I could have done to prevent it, but I bemoan the fact that to live out my life in relatively same that I have become accustomed to, I must move on. Where I'd have liked to retire to is not accessible, it is just too expensive. Like a previous poster, I could maybe afford a one bedroom apartment and live very very modestly, whereas all that I have learned about Mexico says I can live like I lived all my working life - comfortably, not ostentatiously - with less money worries.

Two, I'm a New Yorker by birth and upbringing and have lived my entire life north of Baltimore, and I am tired of winter, tired of overly hot summers, both of which we have here in Baltimore. I have found that where we want to move in Mexico uses no central heat or air, and that, to me is Heaven. I'll complain when the temperature goes down to 40 F in the morning after a while, until I remember waking up when the thermometer read 3 degrees.

Three, like others here, I have grown intolerant (in my curmudgeoness) of Yuppies and their spawn. As a business man I have dealt with everyone from Greatest Generation to Millenium Babies, and the current crop of 25- 40 year old business people are not to my liking. We have created a generation of (and I am generalizing here) selfish self centered people whose main goal in life is to get ahead no matter whom they trample on. And unfortunately my wife tells me that their kids are no better, they are learning the belligerence of their parents. Things like loyalty, trust, a handshake, even a darn smile, playing fair, taking responsibility no longer exists.

Fourth, I have a memory of a time when people worked together, a community, when the idea was to be kind, be responsible, and respect each other. I remember a time when we had the time for other things than work (although we all did work or study): art, music, sports, reading. When social networking meant meeting someone at a cafe, a bar, a restaurant, in their homes. I remember when it was necessary to know how to speak with another human being, actually talk - face to face, or at least by phone. We didn't all get along with each other, but there was a respect for someone who you did not get along with also, that they were different and that was OK. I want that time back, to sit in the plaza, watch the people, get together for coffee or a drink, to take a trip, even just sit and watch a hockey match. In other words, I want to get back to connecting with real people. I hear there is a theater company where we are moving, I loved it in high school, I want to do it again.

:sorry: So, as usual I have droned on (sorry again). It is just that on this Forum, I find people, all be it they are sitting at a keyboard like me, who have a lot of the same values, who fit the role I am looking for and with whom I feel comfortable.

:usa2: I will forever be a proud American, my kids will stay here, and raise their families as proud Americans. But for us, there is a whole world to have new adventures in, many people to meet, and time now to do it and if living in Mexico means we will be more able to that, this a a reason.
 

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I blame George Bush, Sr. and the wreck he made of the economy. (ducks from objects thrown by diehard Republicans). Mom already lived here since the Reagan years (she was a diehard Democrat) and since I was out of work and had no more unemployment insurance coming to me, I sold everything I had and moved here. So, I guess I am part of group 3 also. Although a subsequent marriage to a Mexican woman has kept me here...
 

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Lifestyle-What is it?

I blame George Bush, Sr. ... Although a subsequent marriage to a Mexican woman has kept me here...
I suppose you can choose your demons as to the reasons/persons responsible for the US economy, but the relevant fact for some expats and future expats who factored in the US economy is that it happened, not who or how. This is a very introspective and meaningful discussion, let's not let it degrade into politics.

I have a further question: many of you, many of us yet to be, came to your decision because you wanted to change your lifestyle.
•What does that mean as you go about your daily business/routine?
•Has the move fulfilled this reason?
•Where has it let you down, if it has?

I'll leave the question very vague, hopefully the responses will touch on many areas.

Have a great Sunday - we are expecting snow here in Charm City, hon.
 

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FH, I do think that you get to a very interesting set of points. I was basically raised in suburbia where most things revolved around the golf course/country club.
However I became part of sort of a "wild duck" part of a very large corporation focused on new products/businesses and markets. This inevitably led to extensive international travel and about 10 years living in asia where I really pursued my interest in history.
When I returned to the US, it was different. My friends were great but you quickly find that overseas experiences don't seem to have the same excitement for people that haven't lived there as they do for you.
I also met and married a great person that was both an artist and had interest in world travel so we did.Think we hit 4 continents and along the way we started becoming less interested in returning other than to see family.
This changed our focus from travel to why don't we live there and we seriously looked from Bali to the Loire Valley but then we read an article on the "new retirement zone" from PV through Lakeside to San Miguel. Well the combination of art and history in San Miguel was too much to pass up so we were off in two weeks. Well a week the 1st year turned into a month, then two, then three and we were hooked.
We loved San Miguel but we also like our peace and to get away. We looked around and decided that Mineral de Pozos, already a favorite spot to visit, gave us a great way to have our cake and eat it too. We are 45min to San Miguel and Queretaro in a town of 4000 that sits among the ruins of a city of 50-70,000 people in 1900 with 300 abandoned mines. Throw in a small group of very active expats(about 50) with an artistic bent and we think that we have found our spot.
We want to be able to socialize but with some control, we enjoy interesting people both local & expat, I can pursue my history bent and my wife is in her studio.
We really want to help but our lack of Spanish fluency is a drawback. It is good that more locals want to sit down and exchange English for Spanish.
Mineral de Pozos was just named the latest Pueblo Magico on Thursday so that has brought a lot of investment interest from Mexico City as well as a lot of projects which is good.
I think we have what we want with only a few mis-steps(just have to say This Is Mexico the same way that I used to have to say This is China). I think that there is still not the sense of an integrated community among locals, Mexicans moving in and expats that make things seamless but everyone is trying and things are moving forward.
 

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Not to nitpick, but expatriate isn't a noun but rather a verb that means to leave your home country to live in another country. It has been abbreviated to expat which has become a noun that means one who has expatriated. Because of the similarity in pronunciation and the misuse of the word expatriate some think you are saying you no longer love or are loyal to your country. And based on comments I've seen on some expat forums I can see where people might get that idea. I prefer to think that the USA allowed me to make enough to live where I want to and for that I'm grateful.
 

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Not to nitpick, but expatriate isn't a noun but rather a verb that means to leave your home country to live in another country. It has been abbreviated to expat which has become a noun that means one who has expatriated. Because of the similarity in pronunciation and the misuse of the word expatriate some think you are saying you no longer love or are loyal to your country. And based on comments I've seen on some expat forums I can see where people might get that idea. I prefer to think that the USA allowed me to make enough to live where I want to and for that I'm grateful.
Since I'm a language teacher, I'm allowed to nitpick;). Expatriate is both a noun and a verb:

expatriate

adj
1 resident in a foreign country
2 exiled or banished from one's native country
an expatriate American
n
3 a person who lives in a foreign country
4 an exile; expatriate person
vb tr
5 to exile (oneself) from one's native country or cause (another) to go into exile
6 to deprive (oneself or another) of citizenship
(C18: from Medieval Latin expatriare, from Latin ex-1 + patria native land)

expatriate definition | English definition dictionary | Reverso Collins
 

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Since I'm a language teacher, I'm allowed to nitpick;). Expatriate is both a noun and a verb:
expatriate
adj
1 resident in a foreign country
2 exiled or banished from one's native country
an expatriate American
n
3 a person who lives in a foreign country
4 an exile; expatriate person
vb tr
5 to exile (oneself) from one's native country or cause (another) to go into exile
6 to deprive (oneself or another) of citizenship
(C18: from Medieval Latin expatriare, from Latin ex-1 + patria native land)
expatriate definition | English definition dictionary | Reverso Collins


I stand corrected!:eek:
 

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Canadian point of view

Hello all and a newbie to this forum

We have survived many eons of cold winters here in nothern Canada. Loving the outdoors, sledding in the rockies, ice fishing the cold lakes, snow shoeing and lots of outdoor winter campfires. Am a wimp NO! I am a woman who loves her mate and does all those exciting things which I used to love.

Until this winter (so nice) the past few have killed me. So cold -30 to -40, tons of snow, driving on icey road and just complaining a lot for warmth and sunshine. A few of my friends passing away or getting sick. Thinking how many years left?

So I started to look in the International Living mag. Dreaming and then taking hubby (who is younger 55 ) on a few searching trips for real estate. Merida (progreso) then into the Riveria Mayan. We live on a acerage with wildlife and no close neighbours. I worked for an airline for 28years so have seen the world. Nothing compares to the wonderful coral beaches and slow pace and reef. Wonderful Tulum.

We are not rich but have done well on our acerage which is worth some cash. So we found land and are building a home in a safe gated community. Our dream.
Last week we sold our sleds, our ice fishing camera and now the big motorhome up for sale. We will go for 6 months to start. Yes you can live cheaper and the pace is warm, slow, sun shining, plants all year, butterflys and birds. I am a avid gardener. Who wants to leave it all to the kid? Enjoy your life now with the kid when he comes to visit. :plane:

Make the change and it all falls so gracefully to your side.
 

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I am one who lives in Mexico, due to the political climate in the US becoming increasingly intolerable. I agree we should not get too far into politics, because this forum is not intended for that. However, I also think those who left the USA because they do not like the social or political environment need not apologize to anyone. Nor should they face shaming language from anyone.

My first wife was Cuban. I am certainly not an expert on Cuba, but in my opinion, Castro stayed in power all these decades because he allowed his dissidents to leave, instead of continuing to kill them all.

The USA is also better off if it not only allows but encourages political dissidents to leave without penalty or harassment.

In my case, I left that which I did not like. I also went to that which I did like. I think those who have both things working, leaving the unwanted and reaching the wanted, are much more likely to be successful expats. Those who simply leave that which they do not like are much more likely to find more things they do not like after the move.

My son who lives in UAE tells me that six million men left the US last year. I can find no source which backs up his statement.
 
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