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Hi everyone. I'm at a crossroads in my life and am considering leaving the US for the first time in my life, but need advice!

I'm 38, male, single, and have an MBA and PhD (in business) from UCLA. I tried a tenure-track faculty research career, but quickly realized academic research isn't for me. I really like teaching business and advising both undergrad and MBA students, but the job market for full-time (and full-time paying) non-tenure-track teaching positions in the US is not good, to say the least.

Given that I don't think I'm cut out for the US corporate rat race (which I've had a really hard time trying to get back into, given all my years in academia and lack of transferable experience), I feel like I'm kind of stuck.

I'm looking outside the US for an answer. If anyone can suggest an expat destination where someone like me could make a decent living and enjoy a comfortable lifestyle, please let me know, because it's looking more and more like the US isn't it!

I'm here because this forum seems to give good advice, which is very kind of you all. Thanks in advance. :)
 

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As we have said in various ways and circumstances, you need to be running to something, not away from. But that said, one of the first big questions is: what languages other than English do you speak?

While some business schools offer English language programs, you still have to live in the community/country you choose and for that you will need a reasonable level of the local language. (And some understanding of local customs and cultures would help, too.)

You could try Canada initially. The culture is pretty similar to that of the US - but I don't know the status of academics in the business field. (You could ask in the Canada forum here.) The UK is probably trickier, due to the visa requirements and current efforts there to reduce immigration. Or possibly ask around about the "international" type business schools set up in the Gulf States, notably the Emirates (and yes, we have forums here for the UAE).

Anyhow, just a couple ideas for you to start researching.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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As we have said in various ways and circumstances, you need to be running to something, not away from. But that said, one of the first big questions is: what languages other than English do you speak?

While some business schools offer English language programs, you still have to live in the community/country you choose and for that you will need a reasonable level of the local language. (And some understanding of local customs and cultures would help, too.)

You could try Canada initially. The culture is pretty similar to that of the US - but I don't know the status of academics in the business field. (You could ask in the Canada forum here.) The UK is probably trickier, due to the visa requirements and current efforts there to reduce immigration. Or possibly ask around about the "international" type business schools set up in the Gulf States, notably the Emirates (and yes, we have forums here for the UAE).

Anyhow, just a couple ideas for you to start researching.
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks - those are good suggestions. Unfortunately, I don't speak any other languages, although I'm willing to commit myself to learn one. Also, I'm not absolutely dead-set on teaching in a business school long-term, although I'd guess sticking with my career in the short term would make it easier to emigrate.
 

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When you say leaving the US for the first time in your life, do you mean moving or even travel? Ideally you should have some idea where you'd actually like to go, based on experience.

This is likely not a goal you could easily achieve in a short time frame, due to several somewhat related issues:

1. Language:

Expect quite a few years hard work to acquire professional proficiency in another language. At some point this would require living outside the US to develop the more advanced skills.

If you don't have another language, you are limited to either working in an English-speaking country (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, UK or Ireland, maybe South Africa) or working in English in a non-English speaking country (a perfectly viable route, easier in places like Germany, Netherlands or Scandinavia where you can get by with English, or expat-rich environments like some parts of Asia or the Middle East).

2. Career

Given your age and background it will be a challenge to find a new, internationally portable career. It may take quite a few years to build the credentials and experience you'd need to make you worth hiring for a job in a country where visa sponsorship is required - i.e. anywhere in the world that you're not a citizen of.

Like it or not, your best bet is probably teaching at an English-language business school somewhere outside of the US. As an academic it's can be relatively easier to get visas (I know, I'm married to one) and you can start out with one- or two-year contracts so you can determine whether you enjoy living in a given country before you commit to staying on for longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
When you say leaving the US for the first time in your life, do you mean moving or even travel? Ideally you should have some idea where you'd actually like to go, based on experience.

This is likely not a goal you could easily achieve in a short time frame, due to several somewhat related issues:

1. Language:

Expect quite a few years hard work to acquire professional proficiency in another language. At some point this would require living outside the US to develop the more advanced skills.

If you don't have another language, you are limited to either working in an English-speaking country (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, UK or Ireland, maybe South Africa) or working in English in a non-English speaking country (a perfectly viable route, easier in places like Germany, Netherlands or Scandinavia where you can get by with English, or expat-rich environments like some parts of Asia or the Middle East).

2. Career

Given your age and background it will be a challenge to find a new, internationally portable career. It may take quite a few years to build the credentials and experience you'd need to make you worth hiring for a job in a country where visa sponsorship is required - i.e. anywhere in the world that you're not a citizen of.

Like it or not, your best bet is probably teaching at an English-language business school somewhere outside of the US. As an academic it's can be relatively easier to get visas (I know, I'm married to one) and you can start out with one- or two-year contracts so you can determine whether you enjoy living in a given country before you commit to staying on for longer.
Those are all good points. I've traveled quite a bit, but I've never lived abroad.

I think you're right that I'm realistically limited to English-speaking (or English-as-a-2nd-language speaking) countries, which I'd prefer anyway, and with sticking to my current career. Canada and Australia are probably at the top of my wishlist at the moment, although they're very different options....one is just across the border, the other is a 14-hour flight away!
 

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There are several more countries in Africa where English is the primary language and widely spoken. Examples include Kenya, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Ghana, and Nigeria. Belize, Guyana, and quite a few Caribbean countries are also English speaking. English is the most official official language in Singapore. And did we miss Ireland somehow?
 

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I think you're right that I'm realistically limited to English-speaking (or English-as-a-2nd-language speaking) countries, which I'd prefer anyway, and with sticking to my current career. Canada and Australia are probably at the top of my wishlist at the moment, although they're very different options....one is just across the border, the other is a 14-hour flight away!
I can't speak for Australia, but the academic job market in Canada probably isn't much better than in the US, plus there's a slight but increasing bias towards hiring Canadians at the moment.

Culturally, of course, Canada is sort of similar, sort of not. (I've lived in the US.) You wouldn't ultimately find life here that different, but you'd experience regular something-isn't-quite-right alternative-universe-America moments.

Personally, if it was economically feasible - i.e. you could cover your costs without starving - I'd go migratory and try to find limited-term teaching gigs anywhere abroad - if nothing else you'd have some adventures. Not sure how that would play out in terms of long-term security and career plans, but it would certainly be the fastest and easiest way out of the US.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Personally, if it was economically feasible - i.e. you could cover your costs without starving - I'd go migratory and try to find limited-term teaching gigs anywhere abroad - if nothing else you'd have some adventures. Not sure how that would play out in terms of long-term security and career plans, but it would certainly be the fastest and easiest way out of the US.
That's something I've considered. Might also be a good way to bide time (and stay employed) while I wait for one of the US - or Canada - schools on my wishlist to have a position open.

One thing I've run into is that a lot of American business schools just don't hire full-time non-tenure-track faculty since they prefer hiring industry types on a part-time basis. I'm hoping schools in Canada or elsewhere may be less biased in that direction.
 

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That's something I've considered. Might also be a good way to bide time (and stay employed) while I wait for one of the US - or Canada - schools on my wishlist to have a position open.

One thing I've run into is that a lot of American business schools just don't hire full-time non-tenure-track faculty since they prefer hiring industry types on a part-time basis. I'm hoping schools in Canada or elsewhere may be less biased in that direction.
Not really my field of expertise but I suspect the use of sessional instructors (of either variety - the corporate type teaching for fun and beer/BMW money, or the starving can't-get-a-tenure-track-job Phd) isn't much different in Canada. Perhaps a bit less extreme. (Or at least a bit less desperate, since you still get health care even if you're marginally employed.)
 

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(Or at least a bit less desperate, since you still get health care even if you're marginally employed.)
The U.S. largely fixed that problem starting from 2014 ("Obamacare"), albeit in states that expanded Medicaid. Although the Supreme Court could go insane in King v. Burwell (decision coming very soon) and cause serious problems in more states, but I wouldn't bet on that.
 
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