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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm an American (who is a dual citizen, with a British passport); female, 70, and very active. I'm a retired librarian (with a pension) who has been teaching English as a Second Language to adult immigrants part-time, for the last five years.

I'd like to move to France and to tutor/teach English, so as to supplement my pension. Paris was my first thought; however, I'm wondering if I could afford it. What other cities would provide me with some opportunities to teach?

I'm thinking I won't sell my house in the States right away. If possible, I'd like to keep it and, perhaps, live in France for part of the year.

I would appreciate any advice as to the feasibility of this plan, and especially ideas on places to live and work.

Many thanks!
 

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As a British passport holder, you're over the worst of the hurdles, namely the visa issue. But be careful not to over-estimate the market for teaching/tutoring English here in France.

Teaching or tutoring English is not terribly well paid here - in large part because there are so many native speakers from the north trying to make a living either with or without formal TEFL/TESOL qualification. There is also the matter that, in the area of "tutoring" the market tends to center on preparation for the "bac" (the school leaving exams) and for that, you need a very specific knowledge of how English is taught and tested here.

The big question, however, is how well do you speak, read and write French? Because there are very few facilities here available in English - from hairdressers to doctors to tax forms.

It might be worthwhile to plan a few "extended" visits to France to search out areas that might meet your needs.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thank you Bev,

Actually, after quite a bit more searching and thinking last night, I've decided to arrange for an extended stay in the Montpellier area, with the intention of taking some French lessons. (I speak some, and had some good practice in France a few years ago, but consider myself a beginner.)

Perhaps a few weeks there (and a week or so in Paris) will open up some prospects, or give me a feel for what may be possible (or at least give me a few weeks of vacation) in France.

Thanks again.
 

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Hello,

I'm an American (who is a dual citizen, with a British passport); female, 70, and very active. I'm a retired librarian (with a pension) who has been teaching English as a Second Language to adult immigrants part-time, for the last five years.

I'd like to move to France and to tutor/teach English, so as to supplement my pension. Paris was my first thought; however, I'm wondering if I could afford it. What other cities would provide me with some opportunities to teach?

I'm thinking I won't sell my house in the States right away. If possible, I'd like to keep it and, perhaps, live in France for part of the year.

I would appreciate any advice as to the feasibility of this plan, and especially ideas on places to live and work.

Many thanks!
I would also take into account where you will meet new friends (English speakers if your French is beginner), what you need/do for entertainment, differences in food, how adaptable you are to significant differences in absolutely everything everyday, get knowledge on finding a local doctor, open up a bank account before you leave (if needed/able to). Basically whatever you need/do now you will want in France but you have to then eliminate half of that and have no expectations of anything except life will be very different:)
 

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As a British passport holder, you're over the worst of the hurdles, namely the visa issue. But be careful not to over-estimate the market for teaching/tutoring English here in France.

Teaching or tutoring English is not terribly well paid here - in large part because there are so many native speakers from the north trying to make a living either with or without formal TEFL/TESOL qualification. There is also the matter that, in the area of "tutoring" the market tends to center on preparation for the "bac" (the school leaving exams) and for that, you need a very specific knowledge of how English is taught and tested here.

The big question, however, is how well do you speak, read and write French? Because there are very few facilities here available in English - from hairdressers to doctors to tax forms.

It might be worthwhile to plan a few "extended" visits to France to search out areas that might meet your needs.
Cheers,
Bev
Completely agree with Bev. In all honesty, I've stopped doing "cours à domicile" because for the amount of work I put into it, it just isn't paid enough. Even in an area that's relatively remote with not a ton of ex-pats where I live, the market is saturated with people who post advertisements on leboncoin for cheap tutors, and they drive down the prices for serious teachers like ourselves. So that isn't something I'd necessarily count on. If you'd absolutely need that extra income, I wouldn't do it.
 
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