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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



Hi,

Would be wildly happy for thoughts from those who have moved from US to France...
What should you have taken with you and what should you have left behind?

I'm getting ready to pack....

Thank you thank you thank you.

KMM
 

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Hi,

Would be wildly happy for thoughts from those who have moved from US to France...
What should you have taken with you and what should you have left behind?

I'm getting ready to pack....

Thank you thank you thank you.

KMM
Hi,

Sorry not from USA and still not quite at the packing stage yet so not really able to make any suggestions as to what you may need to pack however, I just wanted to wish you luck with your impending move and hope the experience of relocating will be all you want it to be.

Good luck and all the best, also please keep us posted with regard to how it goes and hope you have a safe journey:D
Angela
 
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The way I feel today, if I was emigrating again soon I would definitely leave some of my kids behind ;)

Sorry can't help much either as I'm also from the UK, but I'm sure some more serious responses will be along soon!
 

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Hi,
I guess the first thing I noticed was the cost of good multi-vitamins and supplements (of the herbal, health store variety) are much more expensive here in France than in the USA so if you believe in supplements for you or your kids (if you have those!) then bring some with you!
The other thing is umbrellas are VERY expensive in France as are good towels and sheets.
We are living pretty simply so not sure about bigger items, but clothes in general are cheaper in the USA, but so much lovelier here (generalizing again).
I am sure there is more, but that's all I can think of (for now).
Where are you moving from? To?
Good luck,
Beth
 

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Over on another thread someone has asked a similar question and the issue has come up of beds and bedding. If you are moving with your US beds, better bring plenty of bedding (sheets, pillowcases, etc.) because beds and bed linen sizes over here are real different.

I'd leave most electrical appliances behind. Too difficult running stuff on transformers. Electronic stuff (computers and most rechargeable electronics) are normally ok - you can replace the cord or charger unit. Check on the UL label to see if equipment can take 120 - 250V.

Large furniture is best left behind. Houses, rooms and living space in general is considerably smaller in France than in the US and you'll have trouble fitting large pieces in your new home. (I always marvel at the enormous furniture in the stores when I'm back in the US on a visit.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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First thing to bring is "Patience" you will need lots of it ;-)

As Bev mentioned, most electrical appliances will not work here or will be too difficult to convert. That said, laptop computers, cameras, and rechargeable items may work with 220v. check your charger to be sure.

Bring your bed if you like it and it can fit in the space here. Forget about California King, unless you have a palace or a country house. Beds here are very expensive and a pain in the "name your body part" to find, of any decent quality. A queen should be no problem. Mostly let the buyer beware. French consumer rights are few and far between. Not at all like the U.S. Read everything very, very carefully before you sign.

If you have a favorite shampoo, lotion, pet food, tanning lotion, personal care product, etc. plan on bringing enough to last until you learn the options available to you. They are all different, not just the brands but the way they operate, the intent, etc. e.g. I found a really great professional shampoo for gray hair in US at Sally's for about $20 a quart. It is not only not available here, unless maybe in Paris, but the available options are much, much, more expensive and meant to be used a couple of times per week, rather than once per day.

If you shop on ebay, plan on bringing whatever you normally buy. It will not be available here at the same price or quality, unless you buy antiques.

CD's and DVDs are more expensive in France, but your DVDs from the US will not work on the European DVD players. Only option is to play them on a computer.

If you have a cat and use a large scratching post, plan on bringing it. The options here are very expensive and the quality is low. Of course there is always your furniture as an option.

As has been mentioned in earlier posts, living space is more constrained. If you don't absolutely need it, don't bring it. If it is king size, forget it.

If you drink coffee from a small roaster (Starbucks or smaller), you might want to bring some with you. It may take some time to find a replacement, depending on your place of residence in France. You can find basic coffee makers.

If you are of a large size, you might find it difficult to find clothing. I'm tall and find it is a major challenge to find anything interesting in my size.

Best of luck,
Ron
 

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First thing to bring is "Patience" you will need lots of it ;-)

As Bev mentioned, most electrical appliances will not work here or will be too difficult to convert. That said, laptop computers, cameras, and rechargeable items may work with 220v. check your charger to be sure.


CD's and DVDs are more expensive in France, but your DVDs from the US will not work on the European DVD players. Only option is to play them on a computer.

Best of luck,
Ron
Having moved from the UK to USA and now planning to move to France I'd add this.

Check all your electrical goods - some are dual voltage, most are not. Anything with a motor in it won't work even off a transformer which only switches voltage not Hz (US is 60Hz, Europe is 50Hz).

Find a supplier of dual-voltage multi-system DVD players and make sure it is "region-free" - they are readily available in the US at about half the price you'll pay in Europe. Make sure the output signal is compatible with your TV (NTSC in USA, PAL in most of Europe, SECAM in France) - consider a multi-system TV, again much cheaper in the US. I have found the staff at world-import.com to be really helpful.

It's not worth taking shampoos, etc you'll run out one day and then you'll have to buy local so may as well start out that way - learned that lesson the hard way. Same with favorite food stuffs, we used to spend ages looking for British Food Shops in the USA - they exist but I'll bet there's no USA food shops in France - other than MacDonalds ;)

Good luck - we're right behind you

David
 
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It's not worth taking shampoos, etc you'll run out one day and then you'll have to buy local so may as well start out that way - learned that lesson the hard way. Same with favorite food stuffs, we used to spend ages looking for British Food Shops in the USA - they exist but I'll bet there's no USA food shops in France - other than MacDonalds ;)
Agree with you about the stuff you'll just run through - though you can restock on visits back to the states. There are, however, some US food items available in France. There are a couple well-known US food shops in Paris - the prices are fairly outrageous. Also, the big hypermarket grocery stores usually have a section for "exotic foods" and in amongst the items from the UK you can often find a strange selection of US items. (For a while, Marshmallow Fluff was the rage. Now it seems to be Dr. Pepper.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Many EU DVD players can be changed to be region free. Google region free and the name/model number for your unit. Usually it just means pushing a few buttons on the remote. Having said that it isn't perfect and I'm not sure it applies to Blu ray.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi,

Sorry not from USA and still not quite at the packing stage yet so not really able to make any suggestions as to what you may need to pack however, I just wanted to wish you luck with your impending move and hope the experience of relocating will be all you want it to be.

Good luck and all the best, also please keep us posted with regard to how it goes and hope you have a safe journey:D
Angela
Hi Angela,

What a nice greeting....Thank you.

I will keep you posted.

I've turned my life upside down a couple times...always with positive results.

Good luck with your move as well....

The community that is part of this Forum is wonderful.

I'm amazed...delighted....grateful & encouraged by all of you that take the time
to help another.

Thanks so very much.

Angela good luck with your move.

My best,

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Many EU DVD players can be changed to be region free. Google region free and the name/model number for your unit. Usually it just means pushing a few buttons on the remote. Having said that it isn't perfect and I'm not sure it applies to Blu ray.
Hi Nick,

I think you must be very young.... anyone ( Ok...any woman) over 35 cannot push two buttons on the remote and expect anything but a black screen.... If I push to many buttons on my cell phone I have to take it next door to the 16 year old genius to straighten it out.

I will think about this though........maybe the kid next door can help....
Thank you for letting me know this is possible. Thank you for writing.

My best,

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Over on another thread someone has asked a similar question and the issue has come up of beds and bedding. If you are moving with your US beds, better bring plenty of bedding (sheets, pillowcases, etc.) because beds and bed linen sizes over here are real different.

I'd leave most electrical appliances behind. Too difficult running stuff on transformers. Electronic stuff (computers and most rechargeable electronics) are normally ok - you can replace the cord or charger unit. Check on the UL label to see if equipment can take 120 - 250V.

Large furniture is best left behind. Houses, rooms and living space in general is considerably smaller in France than in the US and you'll have trouble fitting large pieces in your new home. (I always marvel at the enormous furniture in the stores when I'm back in the US on a visit.)
Cheers,
Bev
Hi Bev,

Will my US lamps work?
Am hoping so as I have a close relationship with my lamps.

I too marvel at the huge size of US furnishings.... most of the housing built between 1990 and 2005 was of massive size... to me 4000 sqft. is massive...

Thank you...will be very careful with the upholstered pieces I bring.

Yes bringing my beds. Will bring lots of sheets.

Thank you again Bev.

Best,

K
 

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Depending on the type of lamp you have, it may be possible to have them rewired to take European bulbs and run off the local plugs. It's not really terribly efficient to run lamps off transformers, due to the heat the transformers throw off.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi,
I guess the first thing I noticed was the cost of good multi-vitamins and supplements (of the herbal, health store variety) are much more expensive here in France than in the USA so if you believe in supplements for you or your kids (if you have those!) then bring some with you!
The other thing is umbrellas are VERY expensive in France as are good towels and sheets.
We are living pretty simply so not sure about bigger items, but clothes in general are cheaper in the USA, but so much lovelier here (generalizing again).
I am sure there is more, but that's all I can think of (for now).
Where are you moving from? To?
Good luck,
Beth
Hi Beth,

Thank you.....

The US has such wonderful health stores.
Had not thought of vitamins....yes I will bring enough to last a while.

Umbrella's!!!
Interesting...
I have never had to buy one there......will make sure I take all the ones I've been forced to buy (weather) while in England. Interesting...

The US also has wonderful beauty supply stores..will make sure I have enough of everything I use for a while... I do understand that at some point I will run out and be forced to find an alternative.....but.....but..

Yes will bring sheets and towels.... they are both insanely priced there.

Moving from Santa Barbara to halfway between Dinard and Dinan.

Please if you think of anything else let me know....thank you for writing.

Best,

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Depending on the type of lamp you have, it may be possible to have them rewired to take European bulbs and run off the local plugs. It's not really terribly efficient to run lamps off transformers, due to the heat the transformers throw off.
Cheers,
Bev
Hi Bev,

Ok I understand...will bring my lamps.

Thank you!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The way I feel today, if I was emigrating again soon I would definitely leave some of my kids behind ;)

Sorry can't help much either as I'm also from the UK, but I'm sure some more serious responses will be along soon!
Hi Frog,

Smiling at your comment.....

I sent you a reply few minutes ago but...whatever button I pushed sent it off..........somewhere...?

If this is a duplicate I apologize.

Leaving the kids at home. I have supplied sufficient (I've been very generous)
education that should, in theory, provide them with all the tools they need to become productive adults... however.....

I will await your list of items you ask friends (who visit from UK) to bring you.

I am bringing a case of Duncan Heins brownie mix.

Thank you for writing.

My best,

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
First thing to bring is "Patience" you will need lots of it ;-)

As Bev mentioned, most electrical appliances will not work here or will be too difficult to convert. That said, laptop computers, cameras, and rechargeable items may work with 220v. check your charger to be sure.

Bring your bed if you like it and it can fit in the space here. Forget about California King, unless you have a palace or a country house. Beds here are very expensive and a pain in the "name your body part" to find, of any decent quality. A queen should be no problem. Mostly let the buyer beware. French consumer rights are few and far between. Not at all like the U.S. Read everything very, very carefully before you sign.

If you have a favorite shampoo, lotion, pet food, tanning lotion, personal care product, etc. plan on bringing enough to last until you learn the options available to you. They are all different, not just the brands but the way they operate, the intent, etc. e.g. I found a really great professional shampoo for gray hair in US at Sally's for about $20 a quart. It is not only not available here, unless maybe in Paris, but the available options are much, much, more expensive and meant to be used a couple of times per week, rather than once per day.

If you shop on ebay, plan on bringing whatever you normally buy. It will not be available here at the same price or quality, unless you buy antiques.

CD's and DVDs are more expensive in France, but your DVDs from the US will not work on the European DVD players. Only option is to play them on a computer.

If you have a cat and use a large scratching post, plan on bringing it. The options here are very expensive and the quality is low. Of course there is always your furniture as an option.

As has been mentioned in earlier posts, living space is more constrained. If you don't absolutely need it, don't bring it. If it is king size, forget it.

If you drink coffee from a small roaster (Starbucks or smaller), you might want to bring some with you. It may take some time to find a replacement, depending on your place of residence in France. You can find basic coffee makers.

If you are of a large size, you might find it difficult to find clothing. I'm tall and find it is a major challenge to find anything interesting in my size.

Best of luck,
Ron
Hi Ron,

YES I have a cat.... she has a three story ( I know you understand ) kitty condo...
It will come with us. I would never have thought about bringing this....thank you.

Will be bringing two queen sized beds...with sheets. I agree French beds are.......really weird.

Sally's is wonderful...I love Sally's. I have a box of products that are already packed.....but reading your post I think I will go back for more. If you are in Brittany/Normandy let me know what shampoo you want and I'll bring it.

Coffee...yes!

Understand about DVD's.

Thank you for your advice regarding taking care about whatever is signed.. I will take great care to do this.

Ron...thank you.

My best,

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Agree with you about the stuff you'll just run through - though you can restock on visits back to the states. There are, however, some US food items available in France. There are a couple well-known US food shops in Paris - the prices are fairly outrageous. Also, the big hypermarket grocery stores usually have a section for "exotic foods" and in amongst the items from the UK you can often find a strange selection of US items. (For a while, Marshmallow Fluff was the rage. Now it seems to be Dr. Pepper.)
Cheers,
Bev
Bev,

Thank you...

Do you know you can make the most wonderful fudge with marshmallow fluff....

Interesting the things we get use to...box up and take half way around the world.

What do you have friends who visit bring to you?

Best,

K
 

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Bev,

Thank you...

Do you know you can make the most wonderful fudge with marshmallow fluff....

Interesting the things we get use to...box up and take half way around the world.

What do you have friends who visit bring to you?

Best,

K
When I'm over in the US I usually bring back the big bottles of vitamins and supplements - though I've now found a mail-order place online that seems to stock most of what I normally use and often supplies some of the US brands to boot.

Mostly I bring back guilty pleasures in the food line. A huge jar of Skippy peanut butter, for example, costs about the same in the US as the little jars available in the hypermarkets here. Lately I've brought back Manischewitz soup mixes (the ones they sell in the little tubes) and certain kinds of herbal teas, just because they're different from what you get over here.

And of course books, lots of books. Books in English are expensive here, not to mention difficult to find unless you're in the Paris area. You can order from Amazon.co.uk - but you have to figure in shipping costs. Stuff ordered from Amazon.fr is usually shipped for free, but that's because it's illegal to discount books in France. (Also their selection of English language material is somewhat limited.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Hi Nick,

I think you must be very young.... anyone ( Ok...any woman) over 35 cannot push two buttons on the remote and expect anything but a black screen.... If I push to many buttons on my cell phone I have to take it next door to the 16 year old genius to straighten it out.

I will think about this though........maybe the kid next door can help....
Thank you for letting me know this is possible. Thank you for writing.

My best,

K
First time I used a computer it had punch cards :D If you can change channels on the TV you can manage unlocking most DVD players.

Often you can just switch to 220V bulbs for lamps but remember the EU is moving away from old style bulbs.
 
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