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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I want to know what are the best job boards to find chemical engineering, process engineering jobs and other related disciplines in at least some of the following countries: Kazakhstan, India, China, Azerbaijan, Singapore, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Japan, Philippines, or any other asian country with good prospects for engineers.

Thank you in advance.
 

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Do you speak any of those languages?

As of 2 years ago, you state that you only speak English and Spanish... while you may be able to get away with speaking English on the job in Japan, China, India, Singapore and the Philippines, you're going to have to know the local language if you want to survive day to day outside of the work place.

I seriously doubt that you could get by in English in Turkmenistan or Kazakhstan.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am looking for a job overseas since there are very few jobs here in Spain. You are trying to tell me that everything is imposible, right? I have been living and working in Mexico, everybody told me that was imposible to get a job in Mexico without a job offer if I went as tourist, I did so, I had to get married but I worked in Mexico and I got all the needed permits to work there. It was not easy, I did not have much money and I lived in a dangerous place, I still remember how taxists told me "you are living in a dangerous place, take care" and in another city I even was robbed at home. It's not the first time I would emigrate to other country.

I hate when people tell me is imposible, finding a job in any international location and this is the reason I am asking for a lot of countries, I doubt this is more difficult that winning Olympics, a job in the planet earth, come on!. I am willing to learn everything is needed in any country, everyday thousands of people find jobs, most of them overseas but noooooooo it's imposible for me, why?
 

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In this line of work English is generally a common language.
Try googling working abroad as a chemical engineer
there are several site witih lots of information and indeed jobs looking for people to fil them.
You could narrow your search by adding the country to the question

Do not give up your dream! good luck:D
 

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I'm not saying that it's impossible to find a job overseas - it's not impossible to find work overseas... I've done it myself and I know people who have done it/are doing it as well, some without having obtained a job/work permit first - nor am I saying don't do it but rather I'm saying that you'll have an easier time of it once you get to your new country if you have at least a working knowledge of the official languages of the places that you're looking to move to.

My brother found a good job in Japan teaching English and while he had a basic knowledge of Japanese (i.e. more than just the phrases that tourists might use; he and I both studied basic Japanese for a couple of years in secondary school) he had some trouble in the beginning with life outside of the classroom because he couldn't understand what people were asking of him - he attended language classes at the week end and did some at-home study in the evenings, after school.

In regards to your Mexico experience, that's not really a fair example - you speak Spanish so you could easily get by in Mexico alone (and you had a solution to your "problem" about getting a work permit that isn't necessarily available to everyone who seeks to live and work overseas) whereas someone like me (a previously single woman English speaker from Canada with a working knowledge of French and no ties to Mexican language or culture) would have some difficulty getting used to life in Mexico (and Spain, for that matter) because I don't know the language very well - I know basic "tourist" Spanish but that won't help me open a bank account or get my young daughter registered with a doctor or set up telephone service at my home if I were to attempt to do these things by myself.

I'm all for living and working outside of your home country (I lived and worked in the Caribbean for a few years before I came to the UK to get married to a British man... like you, that's how I got my permission to work in the UK and the EU [I am now a UK citizen]) but I think that you should consider the impact that your outside-of-work life will have... will you really want to put in a 40+ hour work week and then go home and put in extra hours (in private study and/or at a language school) learning how to read and speak a language like Japanese or Chinese or Turkmen (Japanese has three different and interchangeable writing systems in every day use; Chinese pronunciation can be difficult for learners and if you don't get the sounds correct, you could be saying something completely different than what you intended). Will your partner want to learn these languages as well or will she be stuck at home while you're at work or socialising solely with the Spanish speaking expat community who live in those areas (if such communities exist in Turkmenistan or Kazakhstan) if she doesn't want to/won't learn?

Anyway, I'm not trying to dissuade you from following your dreams (I'd say if the opportunity to go abroad exists, definitely go for it!) but rather to make you aware that there are intangibles about life as an expat that you may or may not have considered that will have an impact on your life if you go to an area where English or Spanish aren't widely spoken.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for your kind words. In my case is not because I am adventurous, I really need a job and I am looking for jobs in my country and any other country as well. I don't know if today things are harder but I am being unsuccessfully and I am really worried about my future. If things continue this way, I will loose my wife because she is thinking about getting divorced and I don't see the way I will survive, my parents are retired and can't support me. My last hope is to study a Master's Degree using my remaining savings and keep on looking for jobs worldwide.
 

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Food for thought

I'm not saying that it's impossible to find a job overseas - it's not impossible to find work overseas... I've done it myself and I know people who have done it/are doing it as well, some without having obtained a job/work permit first - nor am I saying don't do it but rather I'm saying that you'll have an easier time of it once you get to your new country if you have at least a working knowledge of the official languages of the places that you're looking to move to.

My brother found a good job in Japan teaching English and while he had a basic knowledge of Japanese (i.e. more than just the phrases that tourists might use; he and I both studied basic Japanese for a couple of years in secondary school) he had some trouble in the beginning with life outside of the classroom because he couldn't understand what people were asking of him - he attended language classes at the week end and did some at-home study in the evenings, after school.

In regards to your Mexico experience, that's not really a fair example - you speak Spanish so you could easily get by in Mexico alone (and you had a solution to your "problem" about getting a work permit that isn't necessarily available to everyone who seeks to live and work overseas) whereas someone like me (a previously single woman English speaker from Canada with a working knowledge of French and no ties to Mexican language or culture) would have some difficulty getting used to life in Mexico (and Spain, for that matter) because I don't know the language very well - I know basic "tourist" Spanish but that won't help me open a bank account or get my young daughter registered with a doctor or set up telephone service at my home if I were to attempt to do these things by myself.

I'm all for living and working outside of your home country (I lived and worked in the Caribbean for a few years before I came to the UK to get married to a British man... like you, that's how I got my permission to work in the UK and the EU [I am now a UK citizen]) but I think that you should consider the impact that your outside-of-work life will have... will you really want to put in a 40+ hour work week and then go home and put in extra hours (in private study and/or at a language school) learning how to read and speak a language like Japanese or Chinese or Turkmen (Japanese has three different and interchangeable writing systems in every day use; Chinese pronunciation can be difficult for learners and if you don't get the sounds correct, you could be saying something completely different than what you intended). Will your partner want to learn these languages as well or will she be stuck at home while you're at work or socialising solely with the Spanish speaking expat community who live in those areas (if such communities exist in Turkmenistan or Kazakhstan) if she doesn't want to/won't learn?

Anyway, I'm not trying to dissuade you from following your dreams (I'd say if the opportunity to go abroad exists, definitely go for it!) but rather to make you aware that there are intangibles about life as an expat that you may or may not have considered that will have an impact on your life if you go to an area where English or Spanish aren't widely spoken.
Thank you for this information, especially the part about putting in extra hours of, or private study in learning the language, in my case Chinese, of the host country.
 
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