Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
This is certainly not unique to my city, Querétaro, but it is something I enjoy. Like the old theme song on Cheers, I like to go where everybody knows my name. At the smaller taquerias, I am greeted by name and a genuine smile. If I go alone, I am always asked "Where is your wife ?" and they call her by name. We usually walk, as some are very close, and it literally makes my day when I see them smiling after recognizing us when we are still a half block away. Am I the most special of all the customers, no, but they make me feel like I am. So, I guess what I enjoy about my city is the personalty of the street restaurants in my area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,467 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My colonias

This is certainly not unique to my city, Querétaro, but it is something I enjoy. Like the old theme song on Cheers, I like to go where everybody knows my name. At the smaller taquerias, I am greeted by name and a genuine smile. If I go alone, I am always asked "Where is your wife ?" and they call her by name. We usually walk, as some are very close, and it literally makes my day when I see them smiling after recognizing us when we are still a half block away. Am I the most special of all the customers, no, but they make me feel like I am. So, I guess what I enjoy about my city is the personalty of the street restaurants in my area.
I like the fact that I can walk everywhere and when going to El Centro I can take a bus and not worry about parking or the time on parking meters, just go anywhere I want and can always ask someone what Ruta # to take to get back to where I can get my bus back home. Most Rutas come about every 10 minutes. The buses in SLP are usually newer and usually clean inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,041 Posts
I guess that we are semi-hermits. I'm a history buff & my wife is an artist. Many people need to socialize to be recharged but we need our solitude.
We like where we are because pretty much our choice if we want to hike into town(about 4K people) or just hang out at our place with our dogs, cats and the most amazing views that I have ever seen.
 
G

·
I like the way drivers here can meet at an unregulated intersection (no stoplights or stop signs)with 4 divided lanes in both directions, allowing the other driver(s) to go ahead, and then proceed without having a major smashup or flipping the bird or shouting at other drivers.

The absence of those darned parking meters.

The (almost) nonexistent use of car horns in the streets.

Clean taxis and clean buses.

Old-fashioned and unfailing politeness from whomever you interact with in MX.

The end of the day, when the sun is going down, a clear blue sky, a light cool breeze, the evening star shining bright, and peace.





-
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,063 Posts
I like the way drivers here can meet at an unregulated intersection (no stoplights or stop signs)with 4 divided lanes in both directions, allowing the other driver(s) to go ahead, and then proceed without having a major smashup or flipping the bird or shouting at other drivers.

The absence of those darned parking meters.

The (almost) nonexistent use of car horns in the streets.

Clean taxis and clean buses.

Old-fashioned and unfailing politeness from whomever you interact with in MX.

The end of the day, when the sun is going down, a clear blue sky, a light cool breeze, the evening star shining bright, and peace.

-
What part of Mexico do you live in? The only part of your post that I can recognize is the last lovely sentence.
 
G

·
What part of Mexico do you live in? The only part of your post that I can recognize is the last lovely sentence.
jejejejje - NOT in Mexico (the DF for those who don't live here).

Sorry, I won't tell because we already suffer on long weekends when those rude capitaleños and chilangos come through here when they are escaping Mexico and it shows. (but I will pm you if you promise not to tell)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,063 Posts
jejejejje - NOT in Mexico (the DF for those who don't live here).

Sorry, I won't tell because we already suffer on long weekends when those rude capitaleños and chilangos come through here when they are escaping Mexico and it shows. (but I will pm you if you promise not to tell)
Actually, I would say that the taxis I take here and the new"green" buses that ply Reforma are pretty clean. The rest of your post does sound like Never-Never-Land to me, and I've spent time in many parts of Mexico beside Mexico City. I promise not to tell if you want to trust me with the name of your little paradise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I guess that we are semi-hermits. I'm a history buff & my wife is an artist. Many people need to socialize to be recharged but we need our solitude.
We like where we are because pretty much our choice if we want to hike into town(about 4K people) or just hang out at our place with our dogs, cats and the most amazing views that I have ever seen.
wh, I tried to PM you just now -- but I'm not sure if the message actually got sent. The user control panel says "no." Let me know, please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,467 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Horn honking

Actually, I would say that the taxis I take here and the new"green" buses that ply Reforma are pretty clean. The rest of your post does sound like Never-Never-Land to me, and I've spent time in many parts of Mexico beside Mexico City. I promise not to tell if you want to trust me with the name of your little paradise.
I had to laugh when I read about the horn honking in DF. When the earthquake of 85 hit in DF many, many from Mexico City moved to Mexicali and TJ. All of a sudden there was a barrage of horn honking that I noticed. The reply by locals was: "It's the new residents form DF doing it." It died out after a decade or so.

We used to chuckle at the men dressed in black or dark blue suits with black shoes and white long sleeved starched shirts outside walking around when it was 110 in the shade. That also died out eventually.

Mexico City style restaurants are now everywhere and doing well. The 2 Sanborns and the 1 VIP in those early days was hard to get a seat in Mexicali.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
I know why you couldn't get a seat at Sanborns . My primo (in law) worked at the Sanborns in Leon and told me the students would share one cup of unlimited coffee for six hours at the table until they began to crack down on them .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,467 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I know why you couldn't get a seat at Sanborns . My primo (in law) worked at the Sanborns in Leon and told me the students would share one cup of unlimited coffee for six hours at the table until they began to crack down on them .
The 2 to 2 1/2 lunch hours for most employees was the main problem, in those days. I missed the fried bread there more than once. You know how people from DF speak in rhythmic sentences, easy to spot?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
The 2 to 2 1/2 lunch hours for most employees was the main problem, in those days. I missed the fried bread there more than once. You know how people from DF speak in rhythmic sentences, easy to spot?

Oh yeah . They sound like they are complaining in a form of a song .


I like the accent of Jalisco . They speak loud , clear and at a normal speed .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
I guess that we are semi-hermits. I'm a history buff & my wife is an artist. Many people need to socialize to be recharged but we need our solitude.
We like where we are because pretty much our choice if we want to hike into town(about 4K people) or just hang out at our place with our dogs, cats and the most amazing views that I have ever seen.
We are similar in that we've lived 6 years in a small ranching community about 8 miles outside of Pátzcuaro. Our house is the last occupied house on the street. We have friends, both in our local community and the expat community, but we enjoy the solitude, tranquility and beauty of our location.

When we want more stimuli, we can drive to Pátzcuaro in 20 minutes. For even more buzz, we can be in Morelia in 45 minutes. There is combi van service during the day, but it has a loose schedule that's somewhat unpredictable, so we depend on our vehicle.

[I would post a picture, but I'm not qualified to do so yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,041 Posts
The area around Patzcuaro is really amazing. Over the years we've investigated multiple Purepecha pyramid sites, out of the way churches, unusual artists and a Troje restaurant that at the time really only accessible by ferry.
That area a little damp for my allergies and a real one day push to the border but a favorite to visit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
My wife and I live in downtown Zihuatanejo on the first street from the beach. I used to think I would hate living downtown, here or any city, but I've come to love it dearly. For starters, almost everything we need can be found within easy walking distance, so no need to drive anywhere on a daily basis. We maybe use our car once a week. Being close to the waterfront we sleep to the wonderful sounds of the mostly gentle waves in Zihuatanejo's bay. Also, another one of my favorite sounds is the music of the wandering musicians who play at the waterfront restaurants and who often practice in the small park in front of our home. But it gets better. Since I was a child I've loved the smells of a bakery, and just 3 doors away we have a bakery whose lovely scents often blow our way. Another of my favorite smells is fresh ground coffee. Guerrero is a coffee-producing state, and on the ground floor of our home we rent one of our locales to a coffee store, so the scent of fresh ground coffee is another scent that frequently wafts though our home. Living by the ocean our temperatures remain mild throughout the year, with winter offering cool evenings but always warm days. We don't travel much since my wife and I both work, but when we do I often do like the former Pope and kiss the ground upon returning to our peaceful oasis from the madness that it seems has gripped the rest of the world. There is NO place like home. ¡Viva Zihuatanejo!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,041 Posts
We have a friend with a place in Zihua but a little too crowded for us. When we visit, we usually stay in Barra de Potosi and drive in to see her. We do like the walk around the bay and a great Italian Restaurant on the side of a cliff.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top