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I spoke to a woman over the weekend who spent 5 years in and around Thailand, and loved it. She had to leave due to health problems and age, but invited us to take her with us when we go (so cute).

Anyway, as she told us of her travels around Thailand, three things stood out which aren't really discussed a lot, and I would like to hear about...

  1. Bugs and mosquitoes! Are they present but not an issue? Are they so prevalent they are?
  2. Heat and humidity! She said she would always be sweating, lost 30 pounds, and while not a complainer, found that she took a lot of showers.
  3. Dengue fever and malaria! She said she got both while there (she moved around a lot and spent time with locals in their remote homes, so in her travels to them she came in contact with mosquitoes regularly)

Just wanting to know if these are things that are unusually necessary to consider. Now, I realize that many expats choose locations and living accommodations that are above the norm, but would like all viewpoints and experiences.

Thanks, as always, in advance... :juggle:
 

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I spoke to a woman over the weekend who spent 5 years in and around Thailand, and loved it. She had to leave due to health problems and age, but invited us to take her with us when we go (so cute).

Anyway, as she told us of her travels around Thailand, three things stood out which aren't really discussed a lot, and I would like to hear about...

  1. Bugs and mosquitoes! Are they present but not an issue? Are they so prevalent they are?
  2. Heat and humidity! She said she would always be sweating, lost 30 pounds, and while not a complainer, found that she took a lot of showers.
  3. Dengue fever and malaria! She said she got both while there (she moved around a lot and spent time with locals in their remote homes, so in her travels to them she came in contact with mosquitoes regularly)

Just wanting to know if these are things that are unusually necessary to consider. Now, I realize that many expats choose locations and living accommodations that are above the norm, but would like all viewpoints and experiences.

Thanks, as always, in advance... :juggle:
If she didn't feel the need to take malaria pills while traveling in rural areas of Thailand, perhaps she also didn't use deet to protect herself from dengue?
 

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Some people seem to be more attractive to mosquitoes than others; we had a fair-skinned redhead friend visit us when in Phuket and day 1 she was covered in mossy bites and swelling; I think my unattractive hairy legs act as a repellent. We have never been overly bothered, check the bedroom before lights out every night and a quick blast of bug spray if required, nothing worse than waking to that high-pitched mossy whine in your ear at night.

Best to use Deet or similar as an all-purpose insect repellent. We have very few where we're living now - all the windows have mesh screens so it's rare we find any flying insects inside, some crawling ones will still make their way under the doors though.

Bugs - well we had a scorpion in our bed one night. The good news is it didn't bite me; this is only 'my' good news as it stung my partner on her shoulder; the scorpions here are not deadly - about the same as a wasp/bee sting (so I am told).

The one to avoid is the big Thai centipede, 'Tdakab', they have a nasty bite and to Thais I have met they are 'kill on sight'; and they can be quite difficult to kill.
 

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heat and humidity

that's why many people come here - the climate. Doesn't bother me, and remains a major reason I like it here, decided I'm just not suited to a cold climate. Lots of bottled water - I dehydrated once when running, not a good feeling.

The Thai meteorological website here Thai Meteorological Department

At our place at 7am today:
25.3 degrees C, 91% humidity, nil wind, visibility 10km. It is rainy season now; we had a huge electrical storm at 12.30am last night, impossible to sleep through so got up and watched the lightning over the hills inland from here.
 

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I have been to Thailand three times in the last year or so. As for the bugs and the diseases, I think a lot of it has to do with where you are staying - in the city or the country. I have always stayed in populated areas (Bangkok, Hua Hin and Phuket) and never had any problems, even though I would often sit outside by the pool as the sun was going down, which is supposed to be the worst time for mossies. Just bring some deet and use it

As for the weather, the humidity is all-encompassing, ever-present, and crushing. As you can probably tell, I don't like it - and in fact find it to be the worst thing about Thailand. Some have said you get used to it, but I don't. What I have learned to do is find an air conditioned place from noon until the sun goes down. Just adjust your lifestyle a bit. And always carry water with you - you can buy it at the 7-11's for about 25 cents US

Have fun!
 

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Two of your questions answered. I was stung by a small scorpion at 10.15am today. Still alive at 2.08pm. Damned painful and my wife said the black one more painful but said I will live. This happened while I was washing the dishes in soapy water. Because it is the wet season there is more chance of bugs and reptiles coming into the house.
 

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I was stung by a small scorpion at 10.15am today. Still alive at 2.08pm.
Dumbo - but how is the scorpion?
I knew they liked damp areas - used to commonly find them around the laundry/bathroom areas at the farm, but first tme I've heard of one in the kitchen sink.
Our bedroom here is upstairs, have yet to see one on the upper level.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the replies!

Okay, I think I get the gist of this...

  • Need to be able to tolerate if not accept and enjoy the hot and humid weather. (okay, okay... will lose a few pounds, not a bad thing)
  • Have to take cautions with bugs and scorpions. (netting, deet, dawn & dusk, depends on where I am - look for upstairs bathroom)
  • Get proper vaccinations ahead of time & use precautions with mosquitoes and drinking water, etc. (find good place to stay out of way of mosquitoes from late afternoon to after dusk)

So, all of that being said, and for those of you that already live there, it doesn't sound like it takes away from the quality of life, just makes your routine aware of the dangers. I lived in Florida, Rhode Island, and now New Mexico, USA, and in each of these places there were the same issues. Sounds like a way of life to me!

Thanks for all your replies... :clap2:
 

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Hi Song Si, Fed the scorpion to the ants who made short work of it. We live out in the country about 12 ks from Surin. Have had a lot of rain recently and that tends encourage insects and snakes inside for shelter. We have a single level house which is only about three years old. The other insect we get inside is the centipede, some up to twelve inches long. They are poisonous. Don't walk around at night without a torch. Don't get a lot but it happens.
 

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Snakes!

Don't walk around at night without a torch.
an early piece of advice I had from a neighbour when we moved rural Sa Kaeo was 'never walk into a dark room' - and yes it has paid off, have missed out stepping on frogs, scorpions, centipedes when taking a night-time trip to the outdoors bathroom.

Something i have noticed, or not noticed, is how few snakes there seem to be in our area around Chanthaburi. As I cycle a lot I used to do a road-kill count in Sa Kaeo, an indication of how many they were that made a bad decision to cross the road; here in Chanthaburi very rare, and few big ones. As it is mainly orchards rather than farms the grass tends to be cut short, less places suitable for snake habitats nad maybe they have all headed for the hills/National Parks; on the farm we regularly had them near the house.
 

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217024_198437883528337_100000863816465_462936_27432_n.jpg Some of you guys need to take a trip to Pattaya. There you will see why there are so few 'bugs' there - the Isaan girls eat them all (10 baht a portion and full of vitamins). Yummy! Incidentally, it has been predicted that insects will be on the menu for all people in the not-too-distant future. :eyebrows:
 

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bugs

View attachment 3741 Some of you guys need to take a trip to Pattaya. There you will see why there are so few 'bugs' there - the Isaan girls eat them all (10 baht a portion and full of vitamins). Yummy! Incidentally, it has been predicted that insects will be on the menu for all people in the not-too-distant future. :eyebrows:
SweetDreams, Why do you mention Issan girls eating bugs in Pattaya?
 

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SweetDreams, Why do you mention Issan girls eating bugs in Pattaya?
Hi Dumbo,

Various kinds of insects have long been on the menu for rural Thais and also the poorer ones in the cities (so were snake, dog & monkey in the not-too-distant past). Same applies to China and the other S.E. Asia countries. As always occurs with economic advancement, tastes change first in the cities and Thais there do not now in such numbers eat so many insects. In Pattaya, the vast majority of girls in the service industries are from Isaan and they still like their bugs. Every evening the bug-trollies are out. By the way, they are cooked and prepared in a specialised way. As I mentioned originally, they are said to be very nutricious and full of vitamins. Germany in particlar in a growing export market and Thailand even imports cockroaches from Viet Nam. :)
 

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Hi SweetDreams, Thank you. Snakes, dogs, frogs etc are still eaten. My wife pointed out a trailer load dogs going past the house recently and said they were for the food market. Old ways and economics.
 

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Sounds wonderful. Lighting and rain are beautiful. We can hardly wait to retire to Thailand. I am even prepared to kill centipedes if necessary.

heat and humidity

that's why many people come here - the climate. Doesn't bother me, and remains a major reason I like it here, decided I'm just not suited to a cold climate. Lots of bottled water - I dehydrated once when running, not a good feeling.

The Thai meteorological website here Thai Meteorological Department

At our place at 7am today:
25.3 degrees C, 91% humidity, nil wind, visibility 10km. It is rainy season now; we had a huge electrical storm at 12.30am last night, impossible to sleep through so got up and watched the lightning over the hills inland from here.
 

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Hi Dumbo,

Various kinds of insects have long been on the menu for rural Thais and also the poorer ones in the cities (so were snake, dog & monkey in the not-too-distant past). Same applies to China and the other S.E. Asia countries. As always occurs with economic advancement, tastes change first in the cities and Thais there do not now in such numbers eat so many insects. In Pattaya, the vast majority of girls in the service industries are from Isaan and they still like their bugs. Every evening the bug-trollies are out. By the way, they are cooked and prepared in a specialised way. As I mentioned originally, they are said to be very nutricious and full of vitamins. Germany in particlar in a growing export market and Thailand even imports cockroaches from Viet Nam. :)
Correct. Anybody watched Anthony Bourdain's "no reservation" on Thailand, or Anthony Zimmern's "Bizarre Foods" on the same place? Both featured bugs as some nice delicacy (not to talk about rats and dung beetles in Isaan).

I'll be sure to have a serving of grasshoppers to your health when I get there, guys!
 
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