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My husband and I are considering moving to France from Australia. We are both university educated and would want to work in our normal fields. I have read it is almost impossible to get working visas. Does anyone know if this is true? :)
 

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Nothing is actually impossible in France, but the usual sequence for these things is that you find a job first, then have the employer sponsor you. It depends on the employer's ability to convince the government that whatever job it is can only be filled by a foreigner, and that the employer has made a good effort to find either a French national or an EU national to fill the same post.

It boils down to your having some sort of skill or training that is in short supply in France and within the EU - or being transferred by a international company that can justify moving people around the world like that. Speaking French is a big plus, too.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Nothing is actually impossible in France, but the usual sequence for these things is that you find a job first, then have the employer sponsor you. It depends on the employer's ability to convince the government that whatever job it is can only be filled by a foreigner, and that the employer has made a good effort to find either a French national or an EU national to fill the same post.

It boils down to your having some sort of skill or training that is in short supply in France and within the EU - or being transferred by a international company that can justify moving people around the world like that. Speaking French is a big plus, too.
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks so much Bev, I really appreciate your feedback. I am a secondary school teacher with experience teaching in Australia and England, and my husband is a Podiatrist/schiropidist. We are still trying to find information regarding the need for teachers and podiatrists in France. Any of your thoughts would be appreciated!
Sarah :)
 

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Thanks so much Bev, I really appreciate your feedback. I am a secondary school teacher with experience teaching in Australia and England, and my husband is a Podiatrist/schiropidist. We are still trying to find information regarding the need for teachers and podiatrists in France. Any of your thoughts would be appreciated!
Sarah :)
Teaching in France for English-speaking people means either TEFL or working in an international (British curriculum, US curriculum etc) school. For the former, it's next to impossible to get a work visa, as there's a glut of British, Irish and other EU citizen teachers looking for jobs, and a language school is hardly likely to convince the labour authorities for the need to employ a non-EU citizen in preference to those who don't require a permit or visa. For the latter, a similar consideration applies: a school is likely to recruit those who already have work privileges on the ground of citizenship or resident status (e.g. spouse of an EU national). It's next to impossible for a non-French citizen (even another EU citizen) to teach in state schools, even if qualification and language are no problems, as teachers are centrally recruited by the Education Ministry as civil servants, and the competition is very keen.
For your husband, to set oneself up in France in any profession requires getting his quaification verified, membership of a professional body plus getting a work visa. Problem with a non-EU qualification is that there is no general principle of reciprocity (a British-qualified podiatrist has in theory the right to have their qualification recognised in any other EU country; in reality it can be a slow, bureaucratic process), so the outlook is uncertain - in the worst case your husband may have to get local qualifications afresh or undergo further training at a French institute. Even then he will have great difficulty getting employment or setting himself up in self-employment unless he has fluent French, and because of tricky visa issue.
If one of you is eligible for British or Irish passport, that would make a move to France easier, as you won't have a big visa issue (the non-EU citizen partner still has to get permission), but other issues still remain. If you are both under 30, there's a possibility of a year's working holiday visa, available to Australians. You may not be able to get a job in your professional capacity, but getting casual jobs is possible, though unemployment is pretty bad in France.
 

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Thanks so much Bev, I really appreciate your feedback. I am a secondary school teacher with experience teaching in Australia and England, and my husband is a Podiatrist/schiropidist. We are still trying to find information regarding the need for teachers and podiatrists in France. Any of your thoughts would be appreciated!
Sarah :)
Probably the most informative source I know of for employment matters is: EUROPA - EURES - the European Job Mobility Portal which is part of the EU website system. Take a look, too, at the sticky message at the top of this section that promises handy links. There should be some information there about getting foreign qualifications recognized.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Teaching in France for English-speaking people means either TEFL or working in an international (British curriculum, US curriculum etc) school. For the former, it's next to impossible to get a work visa, as there's a glut of British, Irish and other EU citizen teachers looking for jobs, and a language school is hardly likely to convince the labour authorities for the need to employ a non-EU citizen in preference to those who don't require a permit or visa. For the latter, a similar consideration applies: a school is likely to recruit those who already have work privileges on the ground of citizenship or resident status (e.g. spouse of an EU national). It's next to impossible for a non-French citizen (even another EU citizen) to teach in state schools, even if qualification and language are no problems, as teachers are centrally recruited by the Education Ministry as civil servants, and the competition is very keen.
For your husband, to set oneself up in France in any profession requires getting his quaification verified, membership of a professional body plus getting a work visa. Problem with a non-EU qualification is that there is no general principle of reciprocity (a British-qualified podiatrist has in theory the right to have their qualification recognised in any other EU country; in reality it can be a slow, bureaucratic process), so the outlook is uncertain - in the worst case your husband may have to get local qualifications afresh or undergo further training at a French institute. Even then he will have great difficulty getting employment or setting himself up in self-employment unless he has fluent French, and because of tricky visa issue.
If one of you is eligible for British or Irish passport, that would make a move to France easier, as you won't have a big visa issue (the non-EU citizen partner still has to get permission), but other issues still remain. If you are both under 30, there's a possibility of a year's working holiday visa, available to Australians. You may not be able to get a job in your professional capacity, but getting casual jobs is possible, though unemployment is pretty bad in France.

Thanks so much for all your feedback - it sounds fairly grim! We'll keep on trying. :)
 
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