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If a "US Person" makes all their money in US, has US bank accts, can he still pay full taxes to US even if the 30 day residence no longer exists?

Some suggested to become a resident of Nevada or Florida (no state tax) and go that route. It may sound fishy but it's the opposite of cheating Uncle Sam on taxes ;)

It may come in handy for s-corps and other social security taxes. Is it doable? Advisable in regard to IRS potential problems?

thnx
 

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Different states have different residence requirements. You may have to check with the state you're thinking of maintaining "residence" in.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Normally (for USC & LPRs), you remain a resident of the last state you resided in before you departed the country. In theory, you would paid states taxes (if due) as a non-domiciliary resident until you are no longer (e.g. residents who does not live in the state, but left the country). This could technically be until you die. After you leave, some states don't care; some don’t have state taxes (Texas, WA), others don’t tax non-residents, others do tax (e.g. Virginia). In most states, when you renew your driver’s lic. you attest to being a resident (gotcha!). In some states, you can break all ties to show non-residency (e.g. Virginia) but you must go through the steps, because your free money to them. Some states pursue (once again, VA wins). You cannot change your state residency without first living in the state and meeting its residency requirements (usually 30-days w/intent to stay).
Disclaimer: I’m speaking from my own point of view&exp. This is a informal forum dialog; I am not a tax professional or lawyer; I am not offering legal or tax advice; I’m relating my exp -you’re are advised to seek professional council in all matters before undertaking any course of action.
 

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To get back to the original question, however, it can also depend on the country you're actually living in. Most countries I'm familiar with expect you to pay their local taxes if you're resident there and actually doing the work you're being paid for in their country.

The "option" to pay full taxes to the US instead of your local taxes usually only applies to social security and benefits (i.e. instead of paying into the local health care and retirement systems).

You also need to check to see whether the country you're in has an income tax treaty with the US.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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