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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I got my 175 pr visa which I planned and started some 10 months ago.

In between I changed my employer who doesn't know about this visa at all. They are filing for my H1b visa now and if successful I would be able to go to US in Oct/Nov.

I am in dilemma about what to do, should I go to US or should I stop my H1 processing and go to Aus ?

My end target is getting citizenship of either US or Aus.

If I stay in US for 4+ years I can try to get green card....or I can change my company there to join some other company soon within 4-5 months (this may increase my possibility to stay in US for longer time, since I would be working on a direct payroll, rather than client side).

If I stay in US for long time, then it would be difficult to get Aus citizendship and in case I cannot get GC(green card), then I can loose both the options.
Other -ve in going to US is that my wife will have to study there to get some work visa.

In Aus we both can work directly and there is no chance of losing citizenship if we stay there forever.
The -ve to Aus is that I'll have to search for a job there and so for my wife. And for an IT guy US is a better place to work I suppose. AFAIK, that on H1, a good salary is offered (not sure though yet).

Please put on your suggestions and other options which I can try.

I am an IT pro with 7yrs exp in C++ and .Net with very good MNCs and preparing for MCPD certification. How do you find my job prospects in Aus ?

One of friend suggested to get US work experience, which will help in job search in Aus if I try sometime later. Any views on this ?

Thanks for your time,
Kb1983.
 

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Validate your Australian visa. After that you have 5 years before which you must enter Aus permanently. So go to the US and see how you like it there. Given the generally lower cost of living there you could save a lot for your future in Aus!

We were having similar plans but after living in Melbourne for the past 4 years I cannot for the life of me imagine living anywhere else. And most certainly not in the US!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Validate your Australian visa. After that you have 5 years before which you must enter Aus permanently. So go to the US and see how you like it there. Given the generally lower cost of living there you could save a lot for your future in Aus!

We were having similar plans but after living in Melbourne for the past 4 years I cannot for the life of me imagine living anywhere else. And most certainly not in the US!
Ya, I was thinking to make on trip down under to validate the visa at least.

Is the PR visa extendable after 5 yrs if I am not able to apply for citizenship ?

The main issue is that my wife wont be able to work in US, she will have to take a course there. Practically speaking, that would be wasted if we move to Australia soon.
She is a garment merchandiser and sourcing planner with largest seller suiting/shirting company....getting a decent job for her in Aus is a thing, which I am looking forward.

And why this ..."certainly not in the US!" ? :)
 

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Kindly note that with an H1B visa, you will be living as a slave to your employer.

As suggested, validate your visa and give it a try in the US. You can later go to AUS just before your 5 year visa expires and stay there permanently. You can then apply for A RRV.
 

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And why this ..."certainly not in the US!" ?
I've lived all my life in the US and made 3 trips to Australia. If I were to grossly overgeneralize without regard for people's sensitivities, I would say there is much more opportunity in the US and people are much happier in Australia. Of course it's a lot more intricate than that, but I think it can be boiled down to this. If I were you, I would decide which of those two factors is more important to you and base your decision on that.

I sincerely apologize if I've hurt anyone's feelings with this post. I'm just trying to help this guy out according to my own perceptions based on the above experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kindly note that with an H1B visa, you will be living as a slave to your employer.

As suggested, validate your visa and give it a try in the US. You can later go to AUS just before your 5 year visa expires and stay there permanently. You can then apply for A RRV.
Thanks belgarath,
I have definite plans to validate the australian visa, no doubt about that.

So far in my organization, I haven't heard of any misuse of H1 visa by employee. People work happily and they wish to stay long there. My main concern was that my wife wont be able to work.

Lets see how the scene evolves....if we can extend PR by RRV and then later can apply for Aussie citizendship, then it would be a relief.

Thanks !
 

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Hi,
Even we were in same position as you were 2 years back. There are pros and cons in both countries.
One is citizenship. If you stay in AUS for 4 years you will get the citizenship. But getting the job is somewhat tough for non-AUS experience candidates, unless and until you have some specialized domain skill.
US has more opportunities but it takes time for greencard. It is like you need to search the internet everyday to check the greencard dates. You may miss your anniversaries, but not miss to check the GC dates everyday. So in US priority comes the GC Dates than other dates.
But the family life is good in AUS. Actually this depends according to the company where you work. When I worked in US then also the family life was good. So it really depends. Lot of ppl give time to family thats what they say in AUS.
Opportunities wise US has more, I am sure for this. As I got lot of calls in my domain in US. But in AUS, very few calls 2 yrs back.
You need even to make up your mind if you want to settle in AUS like if you dont get job in your area(IT), you may need to take up other jobs also in the first go to run the family. But if you get the job in IT, you will be lucky that you wont do other jobs(like call center, customer service etc.)....
So Make up your mind so that after going to AUS you wont get regret that you are doing this leaving US behind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi,
Even we were in same position as you were 2 years back. There are pros and cons in both countries.
One is citizenship. If you stay in AUS for 4 years you will get the citizenship. But getting the job is somewhat tough for non-AUS experience candidates, unless and until you have some specialized domain skill.
US has more opportunities but it takes time for greencard. It is like you need to search the internet everyday to check the greencard dates. You may miss your anniversaries, but not miss to check the GC dates everyday. So in US priority comes the GC Dates than other dates.
But the family life is good in AUS. Actually this depends according to the company where you work. When I worked in US then also the family life was good. So it really depends. Lot of ppl give time to family thats what they say in AUS.
Opportunities wise US has more, I am sure for this. As I got lot of calls in my domain in US. But in AUS, very few calls 2 yrs back.
You need even to make up your mind if you want to settle in AUS like if you dont get job in your area(IT), you may need to take up other jobs also in the first go to run the family. But if you get the job in IT, you will be lucky that you wont do other jobs(like call center, customer service etc.)....
So Make up your mind so that after going to AUS you wont get regret that you are doing this leaving US behind.
Thanks SGAus, that was a very relevant reply.

Currently, it's premature to think of GC for me, but I need to take the decision whether to stay with my current employer or not. For Aus, I have to resign...for US, I should continue.

Whenever I have to search for job in Aus, I feel that it cant be from India. So I'll have to resign, if I think for Australia.

Family life shouldn't be a problem, if the job timings are regular anywhere. Now it all boils down to getting a job in Aus :rolleyes:

I think to check out US option first as suggested...and will send my wife to Australia to look for a job, so that I can come there with no worries :tongue1: (just kidding)
 

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Hi KB1983,

In order to get a 5 yr RRV, you must have fulfilled a total of 2 years residency out of the 5 yrs that your visa is validated. There is on RRV in which you can get a 3 month RRV if you've only had a day or so. There seems to be people with similar situation as you from reading other posts on this forum.

Since you have moved to a new employer and they are sending you to US, you sort of have to take it, or resign and go to Australia. In regards to your wife, does she have to take a certain number of classes in order to be able to work? Just wondering since it can be expensive if your wife has to pay out of state tuition. I guess it all depends if she would make enough money in her job to make it worth paying for the course(s). In addition, how long will your wife need to take classes before you can get a green card? I've read about a couple of different posters on this forum that are in the engineering and nursing fields. It is taking too long to be sponsored by their employers or not being sponsored. Must have to be something to do with a visa quota allowed every year?

Living in the US is what you make of it. If you have a good job that pays well, you can have a nice life in the US. There are a number of comparisons between the US and Australia. In a way they are the same and different mostly in culture and laws. People say one country is better than the other. But it makes you think if Australia is better, why is there a shortage of skilled workers? Australia has a positive economy compared to US because it is smaller and doesn't have the problems that US has accumulated over the years. Too long to list. However, being in the US, there are more conveniences in products, services, etc. that would likely be less expensive to a point compared to Australia. The comparisons could go on and on....

But what many of said and I have seen from doing a job search in Australia is that. The salaries in Australia seem to be the same or a little less than what it is in the US. Some professions may have higher in Australia due to the shortage they might have and have to lure those employees in. So what probably will make you stay longer in the US is if you can't give up the nice salary if the offer in Australia is not as high. Also, reading from other posts on this forum a common theme is that the cost of living is higher in Australia. Probably it has to do with where it is located and how the country doesn't produce everything and has to import a lot of products in?

You mentioned above about sending your wife to Australia to find a job.. jokingly. I was going to suggest that it might actually be a good idea. You can be working in the US while she settles in Australia with your financial support, trying to find a job. If it doesn't work out for 3-6 months, she can just go join you back in the US? At least one of you can make some money to support the other while being unemployed instead of you both going to Australia with no jobs and depleting the savings you may have. That can just be one scenario to do if you really want to pursue moving to Australia.

One dominant request from Australia recruiters is that they want you to move to Australia when trying to look for a job. Employers are mostly interested in interviewing (phone or video chat) if you have the specific expertise that they are looking for.

Good luck!
 

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Hi KB1983,


You mentioned above about sending your wife to Australia to find a job.. jokingly. I was going to suggest that it might actually be a good idea. You can be working in the US while she settles in Australia with your financial support, trying to find a job. If it doesn't work out for 3-6 months, she can just go join you back in the US?
Well, it depends how much the OP's wife values her marriage. No offense, but you need a heck of a lot of trust to do something like that :rolleyes: - unless of course, the OP and his wife are the type of people who put money, careers and prestige ahead of their marriage, we don't know.
 

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Hi Stormgal,

That is just one scenario. But you should know that it is common in some countries where people have had to leave families so they can get jobs in another country. Either the wife or husband does this. I actually don't see anything wrong with couples being separated for 3-6 months if it adds just a bit of financial security of moving to the new country. Otherwise, I find it a waste of someone's time to take up a college course if it isn't meant to lead to a degree or vocational experience just so that person can work part time. I've done the work full time and go to school part time for post graduate studies and it's not so easy with time commitment. Just because with school, you still have homework, projects, and exams to take. At least with working, you do the set amount of hours and you go home and not think about it.

I think most couples that are venturing to immigrate to another country would have to have a lot of trust with each other since this is going to affect their future. Or else if the original poster is unable to secure a job in Australia while in the US as time passes, then both of them would have to go to Australia with no job lined up.

I have read many times in the internet when the husband goes first to the country to try to find a job and leaves the wife and kids behind. The reason being the cost would be too much in the new country especially if the whole family comes. When he is able to secure a job and get settled, the rest of the family comes over.

I'm wondering, what you think will happen if the wife goes to Australia on her own with both their agreement from the husband to try to find a job? Whatever a couple decides, there has to be trust if they agree to being apart.

Unfortunately, I think all of us would have to agree that money is important in a way or we wouldn't be talking about finding jobs all the time in this forum. We need it to survive for today and the future when we eventually will retire. I'm just thinking ahead of why they should not have to waste their savings if they can plan it a different way.
 

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Agree with jb12, I was planning to send my wife to australia before I go. My sister lives in sydney though, later we chose not to go with it as we decided we will do everything together. To the OP, usa is great, but immigration system sucks to say the least. I would go australia and start from scratch if I was in OPs shoes because even if you come to usa all you have is job, if you go to australia, all you have to find is job.
 

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And why this ..."certainly not in the US!" ? :)
Sorry, that is just my personal view :)

One of the main reasons for me was that their health care system is in shambles. God forbid, but if you lose your job then you might suddenly find yourself without any health cover. Going private is exorbitantly expensive and for many simply unaffordable.

I am also uneasy about the gun culture in the US. I feel a lot safer where I live now.

I have to say though that around 80% of my family are in the US and they're really living it up and absolutely love it there.

Give it a try as you have time on your side.
 

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I am in US for last 3 years on H1 and my green card is under process which will take it's own sweet time for dates to become current. I am looking forward to get my dates current in October 2015 to be realistic. Anything earlier will be a miracle though all my other processing is complete and just my date needs to be current.

I started processing for Australia 6 months before coming to US and couldn't apply due to rule change in Feb 2010 but kept an eye on this and was able to apply late last year and once granted need to go for validation trip as soon as possible.

All my views are already presented by other posters that job is easy to get unlike US and I have to agree medical is way way costly..currently I am paying 1200 USD per month from my pocket as an insurance for me,my wife and my son..though employer also pays 300 USD per month as employer contribution....I am paying more becoz of NY-NJ area and things could have been different in other areas but nevertheless still its a huge huge money...

Currently I am also in dilemma as what should be done given cost of living in US vs Cost of living in Oz vis a vis job scenario..I hope that I can decide on this in near future
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi KB1983,

In order to get a 5 yr RRV, you must have fulfilled a total of 2 years residency out of the 5 yrs that your visa is validated. There is on RRV in which you can get a 3 month RRV if you've only had a day or so. There seems to be people with similar situation as you from reading other posts on this forum.

Since you have moved to a new employer and they are sending you to US, you sort of have to take it, or resign and go to Australia. In regards to your wife, does she have to take a certain number of classes in order to be able to work? Just wondering since it can be expensive if your wife has to pay out of state tuition. I guess it all depends if she would make enough money in her job to make it worth paying for the course(s). In addition, how long will your wife need to take classes before you can get a green card? I've read about a couple of different posters on this forum that are in the engineering and nursing fields. It is taking too long to be sponsored by their employers or not being sponsored. Must have to be something to do with a visa quota allowed every year?

Living in the US is what you make of it. If you have a good job that pays well, you can have a nice life in the US. There are a number of comparisons between the US and Australia. In a way they are the same and different mostly in culture and laws. People say one country is better than the other. But it makes you think if Australia is better, why is there a shortage of skilled workers? Australia has a positive economy compared to US because it is smaller and doesn't have the problems that US has accumulated over the years. Too long to list. However, being in the US, there are more conveniences in products, services, etc. that would likely be less expensive to a point compared to Australia. The comparisons could go on and on....

But what many of said and I have seen from doing a job search in Australia is that. The salaries in Australia seem to be the same or a little less than what it is in the US. Some professions may have higher in Australia due to the shortage they might have and have to lure those employees in. So what probably will make you stay longer in the US is if you can't give up the nice salary if the offer in Australia is not as high. Also, reading from other posts on this forum a common theme is that the cost of living is higher in Australia. Probably it has to do with where it is located and how the country doesn't produce everything and has to import a lot of products in?

You mentioned above about sending your wife to Australia to find a job.. jokingly. I was going to suggest that it might actually be a good idea. You can be working in the US while she settles in Australia with your financial support, trying to find a job. If it doesn't work out for 3-6 months, she can just go join you back in the US? At least one of you can make some money to support the other while being unemployed instead of you both going to Australia with no jobs and depleting the savings you may have. That can just be one scenario to do if you really want to pursue moving to Australia.

One dominant request from Australia recruiters is that they want you to move to Australia when trying to look for a job. Employers are mostly interested in interviewing (phone or video chat) if you have the specific expertise that they are looking for.

Good luck!
Thanks everyone for your suggestions, I really appreciate that.

Yes, doing a course would be expensive....and it wont be so worthy if we move to Aus. Also, employer's sponsorship for her would be a thing to worry about, until I dont get my GC, which would take its own time.

I wish Aussie employers could give more chances to offshore applicants. It would be lot easier for a migrant to move.

Even in Australia, she may not get a job easily....so one way could be that she looks for a job for first 2 months and if not successful then she could start study there and stay at university campus, while I would be in US.
I think that staying other than at uni campus only would be a safe place, until you stay at a good suburban place, which would be costly. Also campus life should be easier and more fun than living on own.

I will have to think of more options.
 

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I would agree that I find it strange for Australia to say that they have a shortage of skilled workers. But make it very difficult for people granted with PR visas with a majority applying overseas can't secure a job before coming in. Even if they are onshore and start applying and have potential interviews, I've heard some have received the excuse, "sorry but you don't have local experience".... While the person has the degrees and work experience necessary for the job. I've mostly read this from people in other countries besides Canada, US, UK, and etc. But it's not consistent because I've also read people getting jobs while being overseas from the same countries that people are told they don't have "local experience". How can someone have that when they just arrived in the country?

I think you have a plan of how to approach this in another way. Your wife might as well pursue a degree that will work towards a new career for something that she is interested in and has job opportunities? Yes, I would agree living near a university campus will be okay to stay at. But living off campus might be cheaper since living in campus tends to cost more since it will be close proximity. I think that would be a correct assumption since that is how it is over here in the US from personal experience.
 
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