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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We purchased a home in BC several years ago, but have never lived there. We're now thinking of moving there full time for retirement and have no intention of working there. We've done research regarding a move and we've found conflicting info. regarding visas, length of stay, etc. We'd appreciate anyone sharing their experience/knowledge with retiring to Canada.
 

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We purchased a home in BC several years ago, but have never lived there. We're now thinking of moving there full time for retirement and have no intention of working there. We've done research regarding a move and we've found conflicting info. regarding visas, length of stay, etc. We'd appreciate anyone sharing their experience/knowledge with retiring to Canada.
I do not believe you can retire to Canada as you describe. You can vacation here for up to 6 months at a time but the two basic ways into the country are 1) a PR who must have an occupation on THE LIST or 2) a TWP with pre-arranged employment.
As a visitor you would not be entitled to any benefits from the Gov't of Canada.

Now, depending on your age and if you have an occupation on THE LIST I see no reason you could not apply for PR status. If, of course, the assessing officer sees through the application the visa could be refused.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks

Thanks for the reply. We're aware that we aren't elligible for PR status, but we'd like to live in BC. We understand that we can be there for 6 months at a time, but we've heard conflicting information regarding the length of time we must leave Canada before returning for a nother 6 months.












I do not believe you can retire to Canada as you describe. You can vacation here for up to 6 months at a time but the two basic ways into the country are 1) a PR who must have an occupation on THE LIST or 2) a TWP with pre-arranged employment.
As a visitor you would not be entitled to any benefits from the Gov't of Canada.

Now, depending on your age and if you have an occupation on THE LIST I see no reason you could not apply for PR status. If, of course, the assessing officer sees through the application the visa could be refused.
 

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Thanks for the reply. We're aware that we aren't elligible for PR status, but we'd like to live in BC. We understand that we can be there for 6 months at a time, but we've heard conflicting information regarding the length of time we must leave Canada before returning for a nother 6 months.
In theory you could leave for one day after a six month "visit" and re-enter for another six months, but the immigration people would probably cotton on to you eventually, possibly resulting in removal of your visitor status.
May I ask, where in the USA are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alaska

In theory you could leave for one day after a six month "visit" and re-enter for another six months, but the immigration people would probably cotton on to you eventually, possibly resulting in removal of your visitor status.
May I ask, where in the USA are you located?

We presently reside in Alaska, but our families live in Oregon and California. We'd want to leave BC more often than is probably advisable to visit family. We certainly don't want to take a chance at offending immigration, as we'd like to do things by the book. It isn't looking too promising to be able to retire in Canada. Thanks for your reply.
 

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Retiring to Canada

In theory you could leave for one day after a six month "visit" and re-enter for another six months, but the immigration people would probably cotton on to you eventually, possibly resulting in removal of your visitor status.
May I ask, where in the USA are you located?

I'd like to join in with this thread please. My husband and I have fallen in love with Canada, its people and scenery. We have several long-term, financially sound friends based in B.C. and like yourselves are not suitable for the FSW Visa, (my husband is 65 and I'm 51). We would love to retire to Canada, and I fail to see why you're not allowed. If you are healthy, financially secure and solvent, willing to invest in the housing structure, spend your money on canadian products and so on, WHAT is so terribly wrong with people like us. We are law-abiding citizens, who respect the laws (more so than some home bred Canadians), why are people not allowed to retire there. We have skills which are of great use to the general public, voluntary work etc. Would someone please give me an answer to this question.
Many thanks,
Kerry
 

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I'd like to join in with this thread please. My husband and I have fallen in love with Canada, its people and scenery. We have several long-term, financially sound friends based in B.C. and like yourselves are not suitable for the FSW Visa, (my husband is 65 and I'm 51). We would love to retire to Canada, and I fail to see why you're not allowed. If you are healthy, financially secure and solvent, willing to invest in the housing structure, spend your money on canadian products and so on, WHAT is so terribly wrong with people like us. We are law-abiding citizens, who respect the laws (more so than some home bred Canadians), why are people not allowed to retire there. We have skills which are of great use to the general public, voluntary work etc. Would someone please give me an answer to this question.
Many thanks,
Kerry
With all due respect, it is the same reason that Canadian/Australian/New Zealand born people cannot swan into the UK at any time they choose and setup a home. Despite them being financially sound they would be using UK facilities built with UK taxpayers' money and at some time may become a drain on the UK health and welfare systems.
If Canada's borders were as open as you would have them we could well be flooded with such cases from many of the world's countries.
There is nothing wrong with people like you. It's the way it is in many of the world's developed countries.
 
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