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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a 24 year old Registered Nurse and currently contemplating on moving to other countries for a better paying job. I would appreciate any advice i can get from experienced expats here. :)

I have 4 major choice fo destination: US, Canda, Uk and Australia. I just would like to gain insights regarding these countries with regards to job availability for nurses, cost of living, climate, cluture and attitudes of locals towards foreigners (an Asian), etc. Thank you in advance!
 

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I'm in no way an expert but would suggest the Government of Canada Immigration website as a starting point and all of the provincial and territorial websites as well, also check on medical placement services, you can probably get some leads with a Google search.

Nursing is one of the professions that seems to be chronically in short supply and amenable to hiring qualified personnel from other countries. You will have to research whether your quaifications are recognized. Salary will be decent and cost of living will vary based on your location. Most items will be much more expensive than in the Philippines but overall much less expensive than Europe.

As far as tolerance to immigrants other then the usual ******** you find in any country we are a very diverse population. There are large filipino communities in every major city and I would think few smaller centres would be without some filipino respresentation. Being asian is not a problem. In our office we have Chinese, Korean, and Japanese for starters, other nationalities are from Haiti, Ghana, Portugal, Chile to name only a few.

The country is huge and you really do need to do your research on which area you would like the most. Climate is also varied, winters will be much cooler than you are used to, but don't let that deter you. Most areas have all 4 seasons, and summer temperates here are up to 30C.

Chances of work are probably better outside of the major cities as there is usually a shortage of qualified medical personnel, especially in the more remote locations. These are not for everyone though, especially if you are used to city life. Most of the population lives within 200 miles of the Canada/U.S.A border.

A few years ago the most remote territory, Nunavut brought over a large number of filipina nurses, not sure how many stuck it out. Conditions in some small communities can be very rough, and Nunavut is one of the most isolated (and coldest) places on the planet! I would suggest getting in touch with one of the Filipino-Canadian associations (most major cities will have one) and establishing some contacts.

I work with a British expat who came over 9 years ago and he couldn't be happier. A lot depends on the person.

PM me if you want me to try to find out any specific details. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot for that reply. If you were to suggest a particular province or City what would it be? I enjoy a pretty scenery, i love mountains and beaches, I enjoy shopping and appreciate a fun night out with friends. I really don't mind learning to adapt to a cold climate since I hate the blazing HOT weather here in the Philippines. I have heard a lot of great things about Canada, and it definitely tops my list! I also would like to know if the immigration process vary in each different provinces and if i need to find a possible employer first before moving my papers.
 

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Canada is very diverse geographically, mountains & beaches your best province would be Britich Columbia (BC) our westernmost province. You will see alot of BC in the news right now with the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver & Whistler BC. A high asian population, mostly Chinese and Indian has settled in the Vancouver area. Alberta the next province east also has beuatiful mountains and a thriving economy based on oil & natural gas. Saskatchewan has vast stretches of prairie, more farming in the south of Manitoba, then Ontario again diverse from northern forests to our largest city of Toronto, again very ethnically diverse. The province of Quebec where the first language is French is the only one with its own immigration policy somewhat different from the rest of the country. On our eastern coast New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island our smallest province, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Each has its own attractions. Last are the three northern territories, the Yukon, The Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Vast tracts of land with a minisule population.

Immigration and visa rules can all be found on the Government of Canada Citizenship and Immigration Canada website. Check out the skilled worker category as it includes nurses with at least one year's employment experience. It does help to have employment arranged, this will be a big plus in the selection criteria. There are six main selection criteria;
- education
- language ability (English or French)
- work experience
- age
- whether you have arranged employment
- your adaptability

I would suggest checking out nurse recruitment firms in canada which can be found with a google search. All of the necessary application forms for immigration can be downloaded from the Citizenship & Immigration website. IIRC there are likely outplacement services in the Philippines but use your own judgement here.

I would caution against hiring an immigration representative, the government site indicates that it is not necessary and having an immigration representative does not improve your chances in any way. Obviously stay away from any firm that promises that they can get you a work visa in exchange for a set fee. Any reputable employer will work with you to get you a work visa, and they will not charge for this service.

Many of the provinces should have sites for recruiting medical professionals, a quick Google seartch shows one for Britich Columbia, and a number of other provinces have joint recruitment efforts. All health care is federally (and provincially) supported but administered by the province as part of the division of power. It can get a little complicated as health care is a bottomless pit when it comes to money, but overall the standards are very high and salaries are decent.

Let me get a few caveats out of the way, I have not been involved in the medical profession so I have no direct knowledge of salaries and/or working conditions. I am a natural born Canadian, I have been involved (once) from the employer end in hiring a prospective immigrant, and I have travelled to all but one of the provinces and territories (my luggage however has made it to every province and territory). I do hope to add the last province, New Brunswick to my list before I leave for a warmer climate in the next couple of years.

One piece of advise if I may, do lots of research. There are lots of resources on the web that you can search out, Filipino-Canadian Medical Association is possibly as starting place, I'm sure that you wil find lots of other links.

Good luck.
 
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