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Hello again forum!

Sending up another post about getting married...

My boyfriend and I are at the beginning stages of planning to get hitched in 2017. He's French; I am American. I am currently living in Paris with him on a long-term visitor visa. I am in the process of renewing my titre de séjour for the first time, and am pretty sure I will have it when we get married. (Positive vibes, please!)

We would like to marry in the States and continue to live in Paris.

That said, what are the basic steps we will need to take? We want to figure out our wedding date based on the sort of timing we should allow for all the administrative stuff we expect to go through!

Thanks so much!

All best,
Effie
 

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Getting married in the States is really no problem. Most states don't have much of a residence requirement for getting married. But what you will run up against are the requirements for "transcribing" your marriage in France (basically, getting the fact of the marriage entered into your French husband's birth record) which is what you'll need to change your status to that of spouse of a French citizen.

Basically, you get married in the US - wherever you choose. Then, you need to get an apostilled copy of your marriage certificate (think marriage license, as they call it in the States). Depending on the state, that can take a few days to a few weeks. That, along with the standard i.d. documents needs to be submitted to the French Consulate in the US. (I hear they are now doing this through either the DC Consulate or the LA Consulate, depending on where the marriage took place.) After a few weeks to a few months you should receive a Livret de Famille, the basic document for proving your marriage in France. And then you can change your status on your carte de séjour.

A somewhat easier approach you may want to consider: Get married in France at the mairie covering the town in which you are currently living. (See the US Consulate in Paris' document on Marriage in France and then ask your mairie for their list of necessary documents.) In France, the only thing that counts is the civil ceremony, done at the mairie. You will receive your livret de famille either just after the ceremony or within a few days.

You can then return to the US and have whatever sort of religious ceremony or just a big party to celebrate your marriage with your friends and family. Though getting all the necessary documents to get married in France can be something of a hassle, it's quicker and easier than waiting for the issuance of the livret de famille back in the US. (IMO, at least.) And you maintain your French residence throughout the whole process.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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A somewhat easier approach you may want to consider: Get married in France at the mairie covering the town in which you are currently living. (See the US Consulate in Paris' document on Marriage in France and then ask your mairie for their list of necessary documents.) In France, the only thing that counts is the civil ceremony, done at the mairie. You will receive your livret de famille either just after the ceremony or within a few days.

You can then return to the US and have whatever sort of religious ceremony or just a big party to celebrate your marriage with your friends and family. Though getting all the necessary documents to get married in France can be something of a hassle, it's quicker and easier than waiting for the issuance of the livret de famille back in the US. (IMO, at least.) And you maintain your French residence throughout the whole process.
Cheers,
Bev
I agree with Bev. If the plan is to continue residing in France after being married, I'd recommend having the legal ceremony at your local mairie and having a religious/family and friends celebration later in the states. While getting the paperwork together is a bit tedious, having the livret de famille and the extrait d'acte de mariage from the mairie will be to your benefit assuming that you will be in France for the long term.
 

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That's interesting advice in my opinion. We did the whole legal thing in America, placed our documents through the consulate in DC, and received our livret de famille in a timely manner. We followed the instructions to the letter and didn't have problems. I will say we have the personality for it. Detail-oriented little file keepers that we are.

I have had a few chats with Americans who do get hung up with the rules, decide not to follow them, and then the whole process goes to hell. Don't be one of those. Allow a lot of time and do just what they say.
 

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That's interesting advice in my opinion. We did the whole legal thing in America, placed our documents through the consulate in DC, and received our livret de famille in a timely manner. We followed the instructions to the letter and didn't have problems. I will say we have the personality for it. Detail-oriented little file keepers that we are.

I have had a few chats with Americans who do get hung up with the rules, decide not to follow them, and then the whole process goes to hell. Don't be one of those. Allow a lot of time and do just what they say.
The thing is, it depends heavily on each mairie, prefecture, local postal system, etc. if you receive your livret de famille in a timely fashion or not. Getting married in France is a safer bet immigration-wise, as your marriage certificate will already be in French, and you have a much better chance of getting your livret de famille right away.
 
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