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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If they are asking you to show an air ticket, I'd get a full fare round trip with an open return. That way, at least you can cash in the return part after you get married. I've never heard of them doing it, but legally if you buy a round trip ticket for one of those cheap fares and then just don't use the return leg, the airline can come back at you for the difference between the cheap round-trip fare and the (much more expensive) one-way ticket.

However, on some French consulate websites they plainly state NOT to make any flight reservations until after you have your visa. I think that's an example of "the French contradiction." :rolleyes: In any event, if you bring anything over and above the list of what they asked you to bring, keep it in a separate folder from the stuff on the list and don't offer up anything unless and until they ask for it.
Cheers,
Bev
Hello again (to Bev at least!),
I just read this thread and wanted to add in my questions...
My husband, two kids and I just moved to France one month ago after spending a month in Italy. We moved from the US.
My daughters and I all have UK passports as well as US passports so we have an "in" here, but my husband has only the US passport (although his grandparents were German who fled the holocaust..not sure if he can go that route or not?!). We have been together for years, but only just got married in August of this year.
The last time I lived in France I was able to work without much trouble, but my husband was not with me so he is still "fresh off the boat" when it comes to paperwork.
Where should he/we start? I have no idea at all so ANYTHING would be a great help.
Thank you so much,
Beth
 

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I've spun this off into a thread of its own, as I think we'll attract a few more responses that way.

We've had a few people here recently who are EU nationals bringing non-EU nationals with them to France. (It's actually easier than being married to a French national.)

Don't mess with the German route. There's a slim chance he could get that - but if his parents didn't maintain their German nationality, it's a real push. As the spouse of an EU national, he's got every right to live and work in France.

First stop probably should be the mairie of the town you're currently living in. They'll either be able to handle the processing (i.e. for a carte de séjour) or they'll send you to the préfecture - but at least they should be able to give you a list of the documents you'll need to present (to start with). Mostly they are going to want your nationality documents plus your marriage documents - possibly translated, but wait for them to ask for that.

And with luck, someone will stop by who has done this sort of thing recently and can give you some further advice.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Yes do extacly as Bev adviced,
Prefecture will issue resident permit (after a long and somehow painful) process.
Since you are a European Citizen, It will not be a problem in principle.
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Bev has preety much answered your query. No worries as you are an EU citizen. Your marraige certificate is important and you might want to get it and other critical documents translated before hubby arrives. Make lots of copies. Other issue is health insurance. I assume you're working, if not you'll need private.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just reread these answers as I am now settled (in Pau) and ready to face the many requirements of 'how to live long term in France'!
I just posted another thread, but wanted to go this route as well...just in case I get a quicker response.
I guess the private insurance is a big deal--we did get the EUROPEAN HEALTH INSURANCE CARDS (what used to be the E1-11, I think) for all four of us (via the UK). Will that work for the first three months and then we can apply for the carte de sante (or vitale?)?
Also there is the liability insurance question which continues to muddy up my brain...where do I go? Any agents you recommend?
Does my husband need the long-stay visa or not? He is married to me (UK citizen) so does he get out of this? If not, does he have to apply for it from the USA (we have been in France for 2 months and plan on staying at least for a year or two)?
Lastly (for now), where can we go to get documents translated?
THANK YOU SO MUCH,
Beth
 

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Carte vitale probably not guaranteed after 3 months - you need to be be working at least part-time to earn it - 60 hours in one month or 120 hours in 3 months. Keep any payslips if you do work - they need to show the hours worked.

Illegal not to have health insurance - so you might have to go private.

Liability insurance will be covered by your house insurance in most cases.
 

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As long as you were covered for health care in the UK, the EHICs should work for up to the first two years, I think. (Read the fine print on the card to check this out.)

So now, what are you doing now that you're settled in Pau? If either of you is working, your employer should fill out a DUE (Declaration Unique d'Embauche) which will register the new employee with all the various caisses and should (eventually) get you a carte vitale.

But if you're relying on the EHIC, I think you still need to turn it in for a carte vitale. Check with the mairie - sometimes they have a regular (weekly or monthly) visit from someone from the sécu sociale, and if they do, this is the perfect time to go in and ask them how to handle things. If not, contact the local office of Améli (used to be CPAM) and they should be able to tell you how to get a carte vitale based on your EHIC.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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