Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I'm a British citizen who's lived in England my whole life and my partner is French. We are currently in talks about moving house as he's still living in France and I'm in England, but is it a waste of time for him to come here? I don't want to settle with him and then have the possibility of him being told to go back to France. He has qualifications, speaks fluent English and so on, and it would be devastating for me to be told he can't live here. We aren't willing to separate because of this, but rather just go somewhere else or find another solution.

I'm honestly confused since I feel like I'm reading conflicting pieces of information on this topic every day and I don't understand what to do. Even a move to France would just create the same situation again.

Could anyone shed some light onto this topic for me, please? I'd greatly appreciate it.

He is planning to move in a few months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,571 Posts
At very worst, you could meet the requirements for a UK spouse/partner visa. Under the prospective provisions for EU nationals, your partner would be able to live here at least long enough for you to qualify as unmarried (cohabitating) partners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
At very worst, you could meet the requirements for a UK spouse/partner visa. Under the prospective provisions for EU nationals, your partner would be able to live here at least long enough for you to qualify as unmarried (cohabitating) partners.
Is this the visa where you need to be earning a certain amount to be able to 'sponsor' them? Because if it is, unfortunately, it's of no use to me :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,571 Posts
Yes. Why is it of no use to you? Will neither of you be working in the UK in 2 or so years?

At this point he can still simply move to the UK with just his EU passport. The sooner he does this, the more leverage he has to be able to remain after Brexit negotiations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes. Why is it of no use to you? Will neither of you be working in the UK in 2 or so years?

At this point he can still simply move to the UK with just his EU passport. The sooner he does this, the more leverage he has to be able to remain after Brexit negotiations.
Oh, it's combined income? That would work fine, but if it's depending on my savings or income only, then I don't know what to do. I don't earn 18k.

I'm hoping that his status here will be stable as he will be moving this year. Of course it's no guarantee, so I'm really concerned st this point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
While I understand your concern, given the Brexit talks won't go any further until the future of EU nationals in the UK and British nationals in Europe is agreed upon - assuming he moves over before the cut off date, you should be fine. I assume you've read May's latest proposal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While I understand your concern, given the Brexit talks won't go any further until the future of EU nationals in the UK and British nationals in Europe is agreed upon - assuming he moves over before the cut off date, you should be fine. I assume you've read May's latest proposal?
Am I correct in assuming she's planning to guarantee EU rights, but only within the cut off date. Though, the cut off date isn't clear yet? Which is my I'm unsure of my partner's situation. I'm not sure if late 2017 is too late / beyond the cut off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Correct. I can't imagine the EU will let the cut off date be before 29th March 2019. Even if it is, I suspect anytime this year will be ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Correct. I can't imagine the EU will let the cut off date be before 29th March 2019. Even if it is, I suspect anytime this year will be ok.
I hope all will be fine. I'm not well versed on the different visa types, so that would really be a nightmare scenario.

We've been a year in limbo now and we are no more clued in than last year, unfortunately.


Thanks for your reply :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,105 Posts
Cut-off date can be any time between 29th March 2017 (when Article 50 was triggered) and 29th March 2019, when Brexit is supposed to happen. While EU would push for a later date, UK government doesn't want millions of EU citizens flooding into UK to beat the deadline so would demand an earlier one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,882 Posts
Hi,
I'm a British citizen who's lived in England my whole life and my partner is French. We are currently in talks about moving house as he's still living in France and I'm in England, but is it a waste of time for him to come here? I don't want to settle with him and then have the possibility of him being told to go back to France. He has qualifications, speaks fluent English and so on, and it would be devastating for me to be told he can't live here. We aren't willing to separate because of this, but rather just go somewhere else or find another solution.

I'm honestly confused since I feel like I'm reading conflicting pieces of information on this topic every day and I don't understand what to do. Even a move to France would just create the same situation again.

Could anyone shed some light onto this topic for me, please? I'd greatly appreciate it.

He is planning to move in a few months.


Since negotiations have only just begun and won't end for a couple of years it is impossible to know what will happen. The politicians doing the negotiating don't know how things will turn out so you cannot expect anyone here to have any idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,571 Posts
Since negotiations have only just begun and won't end for a couple of years it is impossible to know what will happen.
But negotiating the existing rights of EU and UK citizens abroad is step number one in the process and the rest of Brexit negotiations largely hinge on coming to an agreement. It's essentially a mutual hostage situation and how this is handled will set the tone for the rest of the negotiating process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,882 Posts
But negotiating the existing rights of EU and UK citizens abroad is step number one in the process and the rest of Brexit negotiations largely hinge on coming to an agreement.


Yes, but nothing will be finalized until the end of negotiations. They could come to an agreement but that could change months from now because of disagreement over another issue. This happens in negotiations all the time.

And even if it is decided now and doesn't change later, nothing has been decided on this issue yet so it is pointless asking random people on the internet what is going to happen because nobody has any idea what will happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,105 Posts
Brexit decisions will have to be ratified by European Parliament plus national parliaments of all the member states, and will only come into effect when that is done. They are allowing 6 months for the process, starting Oct 2018 and ending March 2019. And if the agreement says the cut-off date is 29th March 2017, the measure will be applied retrospectively.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top