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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife (non - British) and baby son (British) are returning to my wife's home country on Monday for a couple of weeks.

I want to get them travel insurance. Does anyone know if we just buy a regular policy or do we have to get a more expensive global citizen policy?

Aspects of their stay will be covered by her home country (son, dual citizen currently) but other things won't.

The small print with the major insurers seems to say that you have to live in the UK but not necessarily be British. others say that you must be a permanent residence which my wife is not as she is on her second leave to remain period.

Any pointers would be great.
 

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Just get regular travel insurance.

For the purposes of the cover, your wife is considered to be both resident in the U.K. and a permanent resident - as opposed to someone who is in the U.K. for a visit or similar short stay... your wife is here on the assumption that she will attain ILR in the future (I know Japanese law forbids dual citizenship).

Anyway, that's what my husband and I did when we required travel insurance prior to getting ILR and nobody asked any questions about my residency status.

Incidentally, your wife can also get an EHIC card as well (I got one after I got married)... check the NHS website for details.

Ogenki de (stay healthy) and have a good trip! I'm sure that Bachan and Gichan are looking forward to seeing your son (and I dare say that they will spoil him, if my own parents are any indication of what Japanese grandparents are apt to be like... I'm 三世/third generation Japanese, born and raised in Canada... my daughter is my parents' 5th grandchild).
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks WCCG.

Thanks for all the information and will look up the EHIC card right away.

Yes, I'm hoping he's gonna come back sporting expensive new sets of winter clothes so that we don't have to buy them for him when he comes back. (only joking)

I have a daughter and a son (both have Japanese and British passports) but I know officially ,
currently only until the age of 18.

Myself and the 9 year old are staying here. She has been sick all her life and is now too ill to travel outside of the UK.

This is the first time my wife has been able to go back since we came back 2.5 years ago because of caring responsibilities. But we have put measures in place this time so that I can continue to work and she can go to Japan. We hope to make this an annual thing from now on.

What a life.
 

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I think you should find a policy that specifically covers your family. While a small claim may be approved without scrutiny, in the unlikely event of a major claim, they are bound to look for every excuse not to pay out, including residence and nationality status. Don't get a policy that states they must be permanent UK residents, i.e. with ILR. Ones I have seen say they must have lived in UK for at least 2 years.
Your dual-national children must make a citizenship election (????) before their 22nd birthday, i.e. majority at 20 according to Japanese law plus 2-year transitional period. As there is no penalty attached for non-compliance, some just ignore it and keep on holding and using both passports. I do know Japanese immigration is getting hot on this so they can face unpleasantries at Japanese border.
 

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Japanese authorities are well aware of Right of Abode and regard naturalisation itself as a deliberate action leading to automatic cancellation of Japanese nationality regardless of if you take out British passport or not. It may work for the dual-national child (automatically without deliberate action) but not for his mother who will need to be naturalised first.
 
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