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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How is it going guys?
Let me introduce myself first. I'm Martin, 23 years old, from Argentina and right now just a student of business information systems (previously, I've been a full time IT worker and student at the same time, for two years).
I don’t really want to bore you with personal experiences and stuff, so here’s the thing: I'd like to work in Europe. Not right now, but maybe in about 2 years. I know: I’m not the only one with such desire, and also I’m not being precise about WHERE I would like to work in. Well, maybe that’s because the outlook doesn't seem too encouraging. I mean, originally I thought about the UK (I’ve been there and loved it), but it kind of let me down all the restrictions they have to accept non-EU foreigners to work there. But then I took a look at other countries, and realized that it’s almost impossible to work in any country within the EU unless you’re a science superstar or something like that.

The only thing I found that could be a glimmer of hope is the fact that I’m in the IT field. To be clear: I study at the Faculty of Economics of the Buenos Aires University. The expected time to get the degree is 5 years. You spend the first half of those 5 years learning about organizational management (or business management), and the other half learning technical stuff (coding, data management, etc.). Also, I worked for an outsourcing multinational as an ERP analyst for two years, but I don’t really like ERP’s. I want to work in database management or even better, in business intelligence field.

That being said, I just want to ask you what do you think, could I have at least a chance? Between my ‘options’ there are: UK, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany and Czech Rep.

If I skipped something important, just let me know!
Thank you!
Martín.

P.S.: I know there are a lot of other factors to take into account before thinking of moving to another place, but right now I only want to know if, given my skills and age, I could have a chance to get a working permission.
 

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I would seriously investigate Spanish citizenship. Assuming you are a natural born citizen of Argentina, Spanish nationality law would allow you to naturalize as a citizen of Spain after as few as two years of legal residence in Spain. Presumably that period of residence would be possible if you could finish up your university studies in Spain.

Spanish citizens are also EU citizens with the right to live and to work throughout the European Union, European Economic Area, and in Switzerland.

You might also have the possibility of citizenship recognition. For example, if you have citizenship-viable Italian ancestry, you might be eligible for recognition as an Italian citizen. As it happens the Italian consulate in Buenos Aires serves the greatest number of Italian citizens living outside Italy compared to any other Italian consulate.
 

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In most countries in Europe (at least those I'm familiar with) it isn't a matter of your qualifications getting you working permission. Normally, you need to have a job offer, with a potential employer willing and able to sponsor you for a work visa. The big advantage is that, once you have the sponsor, it's up to them to handle the bulk of the paperwork to get you a visa. The downside can be that you're limited to working for that employer for at least the first few years.

The other thing to consider is that you'll be in a better position to find a job in Europe after you have a few years of experience in your field, rather than fresh out of school with a new degree. Unemployment is highest here among the newly graduated population. Having some experience in your home country can put you at a distinct advantage in the job search.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
BBCWatcher, thank you for your advices, I'll check that out deeper. About the Spanish citizenship, maybe it'll be the hardest option as I guess I wouldn't be able to get a work permission with a student visa. Also, the employment situation in Spain is (I think) one of the worst in the EU, so I don’t think they would happily receive me. I insist on the work situation because, although I already have some savings (and 2 years left), the argentine peso is like cr*p in comparison to euro or dollar, so it's almost impossible to save a sufficient amount to remain there for two years.

Maybe getting the Italian citizenship would be a bit easier. I have Italian ancestors, but I’m not sure who the Italian was between my g-grandfather and my g-g-grandfather. I should ask my grandmother about it and see if she has the required documentation.
I remembered that my aunt (Paraguayan) has the Spanish citizenship, but she’s living in Argentina right now, so I guess that’s not a help.

Bevdeforges, thank you too for your response! Having worked in IT also is an advantage to get a job here, so now I think if I want to work in database management/BI, maybe I could get some more experience in that specific field here and at the same time start looking for an opportunity on Europe. Do you think employers are open to sponsor people? I mean, picture this situation: you’re an ‘employer’ (or recruiter, whatever) who has to choose between two guys for the same position, a native with no job experience and me, a South American with 2+ job experience. Do you think someone would choose me considering that they have to do the process to get me a working visa?

I’m just trying to measure how possible is that an employer decide to sponsor a non-EU foreigner. I really don’t have an idea. I know that businessmen do whatever is convenient for their business, but do you think they wouldn’t mind filling those papers?

Thank you again guys, your opinions and suggestions are so useful!
 

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I think working in Europe is not so hard. But you have to follow certain rules which was developed by almost all the country. Like VISA and the working permission. If all these you have then easily you will be able to work outside the country. And the most important thing is the language. You have to understand the language of that country where you want to work. <snip>
 

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Spain permits student visa holders to work in jobs that are compatible with their studies. That typically means part-time work for the university. A separate permission must be obtained in Spain.

One would need to make sure that residence in Spain as a student counts toward the 2 year residence time required before natural born citizens of (most) former Spanish colonies can acquire Spanish citizenship.

Yes, Spain's unemployment rate is extremely high.
 

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Hi everybody! I m french living abroad, gothenburg Sweden. I m actually working with a lot of foreigners ( Spanish , Italian, greek, polish, danish, english, Irish, Scotts, French, Swedes, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Belgian...). As we work in the same business we talk about our own countries, the situation of the economy... I would say that you can forget the southern part of Europe... Spain Portugal Italy and France are def not the right places to go to find a job even if you have high qualifications... Those countries are "falling apart" and there is no way of getting a job. The only ones are the Netherlands ( but the cost of the life is very expensive), London (not England though, London, Brussels might be ok, Germany, Sweden, Danemark, Norway (not in EU)... Good luck with your project of coming to Europe, for me i would like to leave the stressfull european life to live in south America (brasil)... Hope I helped u a bit ;-)
 

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Hi everybody! I m french living abroad, gothenburg Sweden. I m actually working with a lot of foreigners ( Spanish , Italian, greek, polish, danish, english, Irish, Scotts, French, Swedes, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Belgian...). As we work in the same business we talk about our own countries, the situation of the economy... I would say that you can forget the southern part of Europe... Spain Portugal Italy and France are def not the right places to go to find a job even if you have high qualifications... Those countries are "falling apart" and there is no way of getting a job. The only ones are the Netherlands ( but the cost of the life is very expensive), London (not England though, London, Brussels might be ok, Germany, Sweden, Danemark, Norway (not in EU)... Good luck with your project of coming to Europe, for me i would like to leave the stressfull european life to live in south America (brasil)... Hope I helped u a bit ;-)
Good post.
I will never return to Europe.

To the original poster, - 'Martinleo'. - Have you considered your (my) huge neighbour, Brazil?

The government recently announced plans to accept upto 6 million new immigrants, - technical specialists.

Many Europeans are looking to Latin America right now, - especially Brazil.

Your Argentina is passing through difficulties right now, but Brazil is growing.

I have a friend from Argentina in the city of Campinas, São Paulo state. He has been here like me, for years. - 25 in my case. - Probably the same for him? - I forget exactly, but he is very happy, married with kids, and teaches rugby. :)
 
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