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I'm a UK expat (female in late 40s) currently living and working in Switzerland. I've been trying to find another job for a year with no success (unhappy in my current one) but think I have enough money to live independently in Egypt. Specifically, at the moment, I am thinking about Al Ahyaa.

What are the views of those currently living in Egypt about the political situation and how it might affect those in the more European/touristy areas of Egypt? On the one hand, I think they need the jobs and so building and development etc will continue. On the other hand, they don't have the money and the MB may be antagonistic to any developments involving foreigners (is this suspicion about the MB attirude correct?) and so all building and development here may stop.

Why was the Carrefour burned down in 2011 - was it because it symbolised foreign influence or was it just a random target? It just seemed a bit self-destructive to me, but I guess these things are always a bit mindless wherever you are.

I'm only just starting to look into this, so don't shoot me! Thanks for any input.
 

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I'm a UK expat (female in late 40s) currently living and working in Switzerland. I've been trying to find another job for a year with no success (unhappy in my current one) but think I have enough money to live independently in Egypt. Specifically, at the moment, I am thinking about Al Ahyaa.

What are the views of those currently living in Egypt about the political situation and how it might affect those in the more European/touristy areas of Egypt? On the one hand, I think they need the jobs and so building and development etc will continue. On the other hand, they don't have the money and the MB may be antagonistic to any developments involving foreigners (is this suspicion about the MB attirude correct?) and so all building and development here may stop.

Why was the Carrefour burned down in 2011 - was it because it symbolised foreign influence or was it just a random target? It just seemed a bit self-destructive to me, but I guess these things are always a bit mindless wherever you are.

I'm only just starting to look into this, so don't shoot me! Thanks for any input.

Hi and welcome to the forum. Al Ahyaa is in the Red Sea area and near to Hurghada...are you planning on renting or buying ? Personally i would never buy in Egypt country to unstable for my liking....but there will be a few who will disagree :D I cannot see the tourist trade improving for quite some time (have just heard today that another hotel in Hurghada has closed).Hopefully when Cairo wakens up some one will be on to answer more of your questions.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome, hughadapat. I'm currently thinking of buying, but had also wondered whether to rent and then buy if I am happy to stay there. Also trying to consider the pros and cons of buying now with the prospect of inflation or later with the prospect of currency devaluation (I guess inflation and currency devaluation kind of equal each other out!).

I take it you were in Hurghada and moved back to the UK - was that because you felt it was too risky to stay, even in the Red Sea area? Thanks!

I'll check back this evening to see if anyone has replied. Thanks again!
 

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If you can afford it, maybe rent in El Gouna first if you are on your own. Do you know the area well? I bought my place in El Gouna ten years ago and have loved every minute of living here full time but I don't think I would enjoy living in Al Ahyaa. I appreciate the apartments are very cheap but I think they will remain that way and everyone is attracted to buying off-plan so there should always be a resale bargain to be had. Not sure what the future holds in Egypt nor the attitude towards woman living on their own. There are many of us living very happily in El Gouna but it is expensive.
 

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Thanks for the welcome, hughadapat. I'm currently thinking of buying, but had also wondered whether to rent and then buy if I am happy to stay there. Also trying to consider the pros and cons of buying now with the prospect of inflation or later with the prospect of currency devaluation (I guess inflation and currency devaluation kind of equal each other out!).

I take it you were in Hurghada and moved back to the UK - was that because you felt it was too risky to stay, even in the Red Sea area? Thanks!

I'll check back this evening to see if anyone has replied. Thanks again!
No i moved back to the UK because i had my fill of Egypt and Red Sea area becomes very boring as only so much sun and sand you can take....going to the beach every day becomes boring....trying to get anything done is a nightmare and also never gets done properly....they are constantly trying to rip you off....egyptians do it to each other so what chance does a foreigner stand...lol could go on and on :D
I see Gounie has also replied now where she lives is very nice and clean but also expensive and is also owned by a company...imho very nice for visiting now and again but it is not egypt but there again very much depends on what sort of life style you want.Come out and rent for quite awhile,i would say for at least a year then see how you feel and believe me there are plenty of rental properties to be had.Please do your research well before committing yourself also egypt is not as cheap as you would think and certainly not if you want to maintain a good lifestyle,anyway good luck in whatever you decide to do.
 

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Hi, and welcome!
have you actually been to Egypt, or did you go before, and fall in love with the place?
it's just that most people hat have been and want to move choose Sharm or Hurghada.
I just wondered why Al Ahyaa.?
I totally agree with Pat...Egypt becomes tiresome after a while....I made it to 5 years!
Buying before you're fully settled is a bad idea.... in fact buying is a bad idea altogether.... people get stuck with properties they don't want.
When I moved to Egypt, my plan was "Go home after a week, stay the rest of my life, or something in between."
The first couple of years (I was working as a diving instructor) I thought I was living in the best place in the world, with the best job in the world....
By year 5, I couldn't wait to get away.....I was so happy I didn't have any 'investments' to unload!
 

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No i moved back to the UK because i had my fill of Egypt and Red Sea area becomes very boring as only so much sun and sand you can take....going to the beach every day becomes boring....trying to get anything done is a nightmare and also never gets done properly....they are constantly trying to rip you off....egyptians do it to each other so what chance does a foreigner stand...lol could go on and on :D
These are the reasons I love El Gouna and recommend it to women who wish to live alone. Call maintenance and a plumber, electrician or carpenter arrives within one hour and a small job costs LE25. Shop owners are not allowed to hassle you. And plenty of things to do. I am currently doing an intensive Ashtanga yoga course over four days. We have a residents diving club and meet regularly for social events to restaurants, days out, parties at villas, etc. Swimming in the lagoons during the summertime, boat rental, gyms with different exercise classes like spinning, pilates, step aerobics, opera season live from New York at the Berlin Technische Universitat El Gouna Campus, just to name a few things. And my latest hobby which I love and has kept me amused for months and only cost LE200 is my bicycle:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151233664488255.512386.665383254&type=1&l=707305fcd4
:love:
 

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Hi, I live in Al Ahyaa and have done for nearly 4 years, best of both worlds really, if I want the El Gouna lifesyle it's only 20 mins away and for the Egyptian lifestyle the same amount of time. Sorry Gounie but I prefer the Egyptian way...I live in a complex, so like Gounie anything that is needed to be done can be handled by the management team here, also if you are on your own I would reccomend a community based devolpment rather than being isolated. Like everyone else said, please rent first as it is a lifestyle that you adapt to or not and if not you do not need a property that in this market you will not be able to sell easily. As for the political future, who knows?? but nothing really happened here during the uprising, if it wasn't for TV wouldn't have even known it was going on!! Last of all, do your research, ask questions and decide what type of life style you are looking for. Good Luck....
 

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From what I found, there are many empty places in El Gouna at the moment and rents are negotiable. Spent about three weeks there last year, very nice. Keep your money safe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks

Thanks everyone for replying so far. Maybe I should rent, based on all your comments. It might actually make it easier for me financially too, although if inflation hits, I guess rents could go up quite a bit over the next few years. Glad to hear that in Al Ahyaa you didn't really notice anything politically - that's what I'd heard was also the case in Sharm el Sheikh and had hoped this was true generally away from Cairo.

Does renting have any impact on your ability to get a visa/permit (do you need a visa and a permit - I've seen both referred to and am not sure if they are separate things)?

I've been to Egypt several times (Aswan, Luxor, Sharm x 3, Taba) - was looking at Al Ahyaa because it is cheaper (will do a visit, obviously) and allegedly being designed for Europeans (thus making the adjustment to the new life a bit easier) but was a bit worried about whether it looks too much like a building site and would therefore be a bit depressing. But that's for me to find out about and decide, I guess. I've settled on Egypt mostly because it is affordable, not so far to go back to Europe for the occasional trip, and I've been there quite a lot (for me), so at least I'm familiar with the hassling etc (not the same as liking it, obviously, but it won't be a shock to me).

My current life doesn't give me time to do all the things I want to do (mostly swimming, gym, writing and researching - I'm fairly easily pleased!). I do wonder if I will be bored, but I also think I may as well try it and see, since I've gone on forever to friends and colleagues about wanting more time to do all this. I'm usually full of little projects I want to do, so I think I will be happy enough, but you never know until you try. I'm budgeting about £10k GBP as living expenses per annum (this is what someone claimed would give me a good lifestyle when I was last over).
 

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Thanks everyone for replying so far. Maybe I should rent, based on all your comments. It might actually make it easier for me financially too, although if inflation hits, I guess rents could go up quite a bit over the next few years. Glad to hear that in Al Ahyaa you didn't really notice anything politically - that's what I'd heard was also the case in Sharm el Sheikh and had hoped this was true generally away from Cairo.

Does renting have any impact on your ability to get a visa/permit (do you need a visa and a permit - I've seen both referred to and am not sure if they are separate things)?

I've been to Egypt several times (Aswan, Luxor, Sharm x 3, Taba) - was looking at Al Ahyaa because it is cheaper (will do a visit, obviously) and allegedly being designed for Europeans (thus making the adjustment to the new life a bit easier) but was a bit worried about whether it looks too much like a building site and would therefore be a bit depressing. But that's for me to find out about and decide, I guess. I've settled on Egypt mostly because it is affordable, not so far to go back to Europe for the occasional trip, and I've been there quite a lot (for me), so at least I'm familiar with the hassling etc (not the same as liking it, obviously, but it won't be a shock to me).

My current life doesn't give me time to do all the things I want to do (mostly swimming, gym, writing and researching - I'm fairly easily pleased!). I do wonder if I will be bored, but I also think I may as well try it and see, since I've gone on forever to friends and colleagues about wanting more time to do all this. I'm usually full of little projects I want to do, so I think I will be happy enough, but you never know until you try. I'm budgeting about £10k GBP as living expenses per annum (this is what someone claimed would give me a good lifestyle when I was last over).



Was reading through the post and thought well thought out until I came to the 10k for a good lifestyle.. I don't know the prices down that way but 10k will never give you a decent lifestyle in Cairo unless you call life on falafel and rice a good meal and I suspect it will not be much different down on the Red Sea..

today,, chicken thighs.. which I would throw out in the UK.. 24LE a kilo.

long life milk.. 8le

toast bread 8 le
 

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I'm a UK expat (female in late 40s) currently living and working in Switzerland. I've been trying to find another job for a year with no success (unhappy in my current one) but think I have enough money to live independently in Egypt. Specifically, at the moment, I am thinking about Al Ahyaa.

What are the views of those currently living in Egypt about the political situation and how it might affect those in the more European/touristy areas of Egypt? On the one hand, I think they need the jobs and so building and development etc will continue. On the other hand, they don't have the money and the MB may be antagonistic to any developments involving foreigners (is this suspicion about the MB attirude correct?) and so all building and development here may stop.

Why was the Carrefour burned down in 2011 - was it because it symbolised foreign influence or was it just a random target? It just seemed a bit self-destructive to me, but I guess these things are always a bit mindless wherever you are.

I'm only just starting to look into this, so don't shoot me! Thanks for any input.
Carrefour was not burned to the ground. It was looted and suffered some fire damage, as did several shops in the complex. It was simply an opportunity theft on a grand scale and had nothing to do with foreign ownership.
 

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Was reading through the post and thought well thought out until I came to the 10k for a good lifestyle.. I don't know the prices down that way but 10k will never give you a decent lifestyle in Cairo unless you call life on falafel and rice a good meal and I suspect it will not be much different down on the Red Sea..

today,, chicken thighs.. which I would throw out in the UK.. 24LE a kilo.

long life milk.. 8le

toast bread 8 le
I agree, one person's version of a good lifestyle may well vary considerably with someone else's view but I would have thought that you would need about twice the figure that you have been quoted.
 

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I have lived here all these years just renewing my annual tourist visa each year. You also need the entry/exit visa to get in and out.

Is the £10k per year assuming you had bought a place outright and not paying rent? Remember the averages wages in Egypt are very low and a good wage is £1k per year.

The total annual running costs of my small open plan apartment are around £500 per year including gas, electricity, water, TV, maintenance, security, garbage, etc. etc. However, my apartment is lovely and cool in the summer so I never have the a.c. going all night which would pump up the bills a lot. That maintenance fee doesn't include major outside work to the building and there is no swimming pool to upkeep as we are on the lagoon.
 

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I have lived here all these years just renewing my annual tourist visa each year. You also need the entry/exit visa to get in and out.

Is the £10k per year assuming you had bought a place outright and not paying rent? Remember the averages wages in Egypt are very low and a good wage is £1k per year.

The total annual running costs of my small open plan apartment are around £500 per year including gas, electricity, water, TV, maintenance, security, garbage, etc. etc. However, my apartment is lovely and cool in the summer so I never have the a.c. going all night which would pump up the bills a lot. That maintenance fee doesn't include major outside work to the building and there is no swimming pool to upkeep as we are on the lagoon.


and who would want to live like the average Egyptian? Living overseas and lowering your standards regardless of the endless sun is IMHO a crazy idea.
 

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and who would want to live like the average Egyptian? Living overseas and lowering your standards regardless of the endless sun is IMHO a crazy idea.
I don't think it is about standards but lifestyle. I live on around £10,000 because I bought my apartment and would have paid more in the ten years if I had rented and I hope to stay for the next ten. Certainly never bought to sell. I don't need a car where I live but in Al Ahyaa maybe you do, though you can rely easily on the El Gouna bus that runs regularly between El Gouna and Hurghada and only costs LE3 for residents.

Outdoor lifestyle (I don't do sun anymore but enjoy the shade), healthy eating with cheap fresh fruit and vegetables and without the temptation of processed ready meals. I don't eat out a lot, maybe once or twice a week as I enjoy the food I cook, so maybe for a pizza or Vietnemese takeaway which are cheap. There are fantastic restaurants in Hurghada off the beaten tourist track that are cheap and the price not inflated like the seafood restaurant opposite the fish market that costs around LE40 for fish soup, salads, dips, calamari, fish fillet and prawns with rice and bread. Parties at villas and apartments with views over Red Sea. Fresh, clean air! The amazing underwater world on your doorstep.
 

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I don't think it is about standards but lifestyle. I live on around £10,000 because I bought my apartment and would have paid more in the ten years if I had rented and I hope to stay for the next ten. Certainly never bought to sell. I don't need a car where I live but in Al Ahyaa maybe you do, though you can rely easily on the El Gouna bus that runs regularly between El Gouna and Hurghada and only costs LE3 for residents.

Outdoor lifestyle (I don't do sun anymore but enjoy the shade), healthy eating with cheap fresh fruit and vegetables and without the temptation of processed ready meals. I don't eat out a lot, maybe once or twice a week as I enjoy the food I cook, so maybe for a pizza or Vietnemese takeaway which are cheap. There are fantastic restaurants in Hurghada off the beaten tourist track that are cheap and the price not inflated like the seafood restaurant opposite the fish market that costs around LE40 for fish soup, salads, dips, calamari, fish fillet and prawns with rice and bread. Parties at villas and apartments with views over Red Sea. Fresh, clean air! The amazing underwater world on your doorstep.


I think I need to move..

cup of green tea and a slice of cake... 50 LE Beanos yesterday
 
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