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Recently I became unemployed. This really sucks because it messes up my plans. I had originally planned to work for 3-5 more years and then move full time to Mexico but now all that has changed. Im starting to loose hope of finding a new job anytime soon so I was thinking about going to Mexico and trying to get dual citizenship now and returning in a few months and try to look for work again.

From what I have read on here I believe that I can go to the consulate and apply for a FM3 once I arrive in Mexico. I have also read on here about the minimum income requirements does this apply to somebody who is married to a Mexican citizen? And does the fact that we own land affect the income requirements?


Luckily my wife is still working and we have been saving for years so we won’t be in the soup line any time soon. But Im not doing anything and Im starting to get board sitting around the house all day and thinking that I could get my citizenship out of the way wile Im not doing anything.
 

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You may apply for an FM3 in the nearest Mexican consulate to your present US address. Then, you will have a certain period of time to enter Mexico and 30 days after crossing the border to register your FM3 at your Mexican address. Otherwise, you may enter on a tourist permit (FMT) and apply for an FM3 or FM2 up to 30 days before the FMT expires. So, it appears that neither of these options fit your plan.
To apply for citizenship, you must live in Mexico for at least two years on an FM2; in your case, a spousal FM2, which may not have income requirements if your spouse is providing sufficient income; I'm not sure of further details in that regard. However, the FM2 limits the amount of time that you are allowed to be out of Mexico and you may not temporarily import or drive a US plated vehicle. Then, as the spouse of a Mexican, and passing a history test in Spanish and an interview, you may apply for naturalization. This may also fail to meet your plans, for understandable reasons. One cannot simply jump into another country and get naturalized on a whim. It will take serious commitment and will limit your travel during the transition. Remember that you will have to be in Mexico for some time to renew your FM3, IMSS, auto insurance and registration, pay taxes, etc.; all at different times of the year. That would certainly obviate working in the USA at your convenience.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks RV ******
I knew that you would know the answer to my question
Looks like that plan is out the window. I was just kind of thinking that I might be able to take care of that wile Im not working but I guess not. Unfortunately Im not in the position that I can devote years to this process right now maybe in a couple of years but not right now.
Thanks again
 

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You must live in Mexico and apply for a spousal FM2 visa. Then, after two years, you may apply for naturalization. The FM2 is issued by Immigration but the application for naturalization must be done through the ministry of foreign affairs. Here's a link that may help:
http://www.sre.gob.mx/

Go to Nacionalidad y Naturalización. There was an English option, but it doesn't seem to be working now.
 

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Oh yes! You will have to supply all sorts of documentation, some of it translated by an officially approved translator and some, apostiled by the Secretary of State where you were married, to authenticate the certificate of marriage and even the signature of the official who signed it. It is a serious process and may take a year to complete.
 

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Work & Do-It-Yourself?

My wife and I have begun researching the best way and the how-to's of getting me a FM-2 visa. Two questions please:

1. I want to work asap. Can I work during the process of obtaining a FM-2?
Theoretically, if I started the process today, when would be the earliest date that I could legally work in Mexico?

2. We've talked to friends who have done the FM-2 process themselves, and we've talked to friends who have used a lawyer. Is the FM-2 paperwork, etc., something a reasonably intelligent person can do by themselves or should we hire a lawyer? We've heard some horror stories about the bureaucracy you can run into here if you attempt to do-it-yourself.

Thanks.

Votexijah

Oh yes! You will have to supply all sorts of documentation, some of it translated by an officially approved translator and some, apostiled by the Secretary of State where you were married, to authenticate the certificate of marriage and even the signature of the official who signed it. It is a serious process and may take a year to complete.
 

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Vortexijah:

1. You didn't specify your current migratory status. I believe you would have to have an FM3 "lucrativa" in order to work legally while applying for the FM2.

2. I handled the FM2 process myself here in La Paz and had no problems, although it took a while (4-5 weeks). It was almost identical to the FM3 process except that I supplied extra papers to prove home ownership. But I was applying for "rentista" status, not for a working FM2. Also, some INM offices are easier to deal with than others, so you'll get a better idea from someone who has obtained theirs in your location.
 

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Makaloco's response is right on target. You must have the 'working permission' on an FM3 or FM2 before you begin working. So, once you find an employer, ask them to assist you in obtaining that permission, which will be specific to one job at one location. INM requires notification of any changes.
 

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Makaloco's response is right on target. You must have the 'working permission' on an FM3 or FM2 before you begin working. So, once you find an employer, ask them to assist you in obtaining that permission, which will be specific to one job at one location. INM requires notification of any changes.
If one is does solely US-based online work while living in Mexico, am I correct that would require no work visa or special permission?
 

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I hear that many do that, and have no problems; but, INM is interested in where you are located when you work and, technically, that would require a working permit on your visa.
 

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Clarification on my migratory status

Thanks everyone for responding to my post! Currently, I am here on a 180 day Visitor's Visa. I want to apply for an FM-2 Visa. I am married to a Mexican woman. We married on April 3, 2009 in St. Louis, Missouri. I obtained an apostille on our Marriage Certificate and my Birth Certificate. We live in Unidad Barrio Santiago, Delegacion Iztacalco, D.F.

I was told that there is an agreement between the United States and Mexico, that Mexico will honor marriages in the U.S. as long as the Apostille appears on the Marriage Certificate.

The most important question at this point is whether or not my wife and I should apply for my FM-2 by ourselves? One lawyer gave us a quote for $2,000.00. We cannot afford this. We don't want to try to attempt to do something that is too complicated for the average person. I petitioned on behalf of my wife for legal permanent residency in the U.S, and she successfully obtained a Green Card, Employment Authorization Card, and a Social Security Card. So, I'm not afraid of forms and spending time learning about the process. It's just that we heard a scary story of a bureaucratic nightmare from a friend who attempted to do this FM-2 process without a lawyer. So, we are worried.

My wife and I would sincerely appreciate any and all advice regarding the advisability of doing this FM-2 application ourselves, vs. a lawyer doing it for us.

Thanks for your help and advice in this matter.

Vortexijah


Vortexijah:

1. You didn't specify your current migratory status. I believe you would have to have an FM3 "lucrativa" in order to work legally while applying for the FM2.

2. I handled the FM2 process myself here in La Paz and had no problems, although it took a while (4-5 weeks). It was almost identical to the FM3 process except that I supplied extra papers to prove home ownership. But I was applying for "rentista" status, not for a working FM2. Also, some INM offices are easier to deal with than others, so you'll get a better idea from someone who has obtained theirs in your location.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Is there any consensus on which route is the best way to go FM2 or FM3 what are the differences between the two and which one is the easiest to get? Also do I have a choice in which one I can get being that I am married to a Mexican woman?

In one of the posts above I saw mention of apposotile and a marriage certificate signed by the secretary of state. We already have that because we had to get those papers last year so my wife could get her passport so at least we have that out of the way.

Also I like the idea of hiring an attorney and letting him do all the work. I didn’t know you could do this. This is the first I have herd mention of that. I would be very inclined to pay an attorney 2k so I wouldn’t have to worry about any of this. Anybody have any recommendations on who could do such a thing?
 

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Also I like the idea of hiring an attorney and letting him do all the work. I didn’t know you could do this. This is the first I have herd mention of that. I would be very inclined to pay an attorney 2k so I wouldn’t have to worry about any of this. Anybody have any recommendations on who could do such a thing?
Before you hire an attorney, go to Migration an ask them what you need to get either visa. It's not difficult to gather the necessary documents.
 
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