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So let me get this straight
When I cross into Mexico I will get the FMT / tourist visa that is good for 6 months during that time I have to go to Mexican immigration and apply for a FM2 once I receive the FM2 I have to renew it every year for 5 years then I can apply for a FM3.

And the FM3 is the Mexican equivalent of the American green card? Once I have the FM3 I can then apply for Mexican citizenship?

Is the above correct?
Is there a faster way to go about gaining citizenship?


The wife and I already have two parcels of land I would like to buy a couple more and I would like to build our house on one of them. But I am hesitant to buy anymore land or spend money building a house someplace that I have no legal right to live. What if the Mexican immigration laws change during the time that I am waiting to become a citizen? I would be out a lot of money as well as a house.
I know that we could live with my in-laws as long as we want / need to but 5 years is a little ridiculous. And like I said I really don’t want to spend 20-50k on building a house that I might not even be able to live in

There has to be a faster way?
 

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During the FMT period you can apply for either an FM3 or FM2. FM2 is the route to citizenship and has more restrictions than the FM3

You can own a house with either FM# ... as long as the paperwork is done right and you are not on Ejido land
 

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Be sure to ask for 180 days (it isn't a full six months) on your FMT or you might just get 90.
Then, be sure to apply for an FM2 before the 150th day on the FMT. The FM3/2 must be renewed annually, 30 days before their anniversary, in Mexico, with fresh proofs of foreign income/resources.
The FM2 will allow you to apply for naturalization or 'inmigrado' after five years; only two if your wife is a Mexican. For naturalization, you will need to speak Spanish and know Mexican history.
The rules do seem to change, or at least their interpretation, as time passes.
 

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I don't have experience at the coast or the border but in the interior, we've basically not had a problem buying land, getting and registering an escritura, or getting a building permit using FM-Ts so I'm not sure I understand the issues. We've had this discussion with multiple notarios with the same positive feedback. BTW, the law has been changed re:ejido land. The ejido now has the ability to subdivide and assign pieces to members. They can then get an escritura, register it and resell the land.
 

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Absolutely, when the law was changed allowing ejidos to subdivide the restriction was that had to go to ejido members and not to non-members directly but compound timing on pass through transfer is not onerous. Problem is often that ejido doesn't have funds to trgister the subdivision.
 
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