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It's an area that really appeals to me. Especially as a smallholder. But it has it's drawbacks also.

Is anyone on here also a smallholder?

Does anyone on here live there?

Can anyone tell me what it's like there as an expat?

Pro's and con's RE. smallholding and/or a small camping/gite business.

Thanks :D
 

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Just because it will come up at some point, this is Wikipedia's definition of smallholder:

In British English usage, a smallholding is a piece of land and its adjacent living quarters for the smallholder and stabling for farm animals. It is usually smaller than a farm but larger than an allotment, usually under 50 acres (20 ha).
I know nothing of the legal ramifications of smallholding in the UK, but for French purposes, I suspect it depends on how you plan on exploiting the property.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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It's a beautiful place we were there for a month, very quiet plenty of cattle in fields I should say it would be ideal for a smallholding, anything to do with animals, dog boarding etc. As I say very quiet perhaps too quiet for us but people round there were friendly if you make an effort to fit in, you never know unless you see a place.
 

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I lived in Limousin for 4 years and found the winters to be cold for a long time , from Oct to May . But I was in a village called Sussac , people say the weather is better to the west of the M20.
 

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Re: dog boarding. Parts of the Limousin may be eminently suitable for boarding dogs, but kennels do need to be reasonably close to a major conurbation if they are to thrive as a business, rather than a full time hobby.
According to the kennel owner whom I know near me in Aquitaine his business simply fell away once dog passports became common throughout Europe. Until that time it was thriving, particularly with expat Brits going home to see family. Now he says many of those have returned permanently to the UK and the others take their dogs with them.
The people who continue to use kennels are those not visiting friends or family, but leaving Europe for a dream holiday. Fewer French people are now flying to places such as the Middle East but they will still go to the Outre Mer provinces.
My acquaintance is a foreign legion pensioner and with help from his adult working children who live in the house he is not dependent on the income generated by the kennels.

I must admit I am always concerned about people who say they would like a smallholding. Producing crops or livestock is one thing, but where would these be sold? Drive by customers in quiet rural areas are rare, otherwise it wouldn't be quiet. Selling at a market requires good language skills imo as accents vary, people expect produce to look like everybody else's and to haggle over prices etc.
From personal experience I know how quickly 12 Soay sheep can grow to 40, and we were not keeping them commercially, just as meat producing lawn mowers. In the end we were spending more time and effort on them than they warranted so they all went to the abbatoir, for a very modest sum but at least we had no more hoof trimming, worming or coat plucking (not wool producers, so not shorn) to do after a week's work.
 
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