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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of us of the American persuasion, this coming Thursday is Thanksgiving, The Big American Holiday.

While it has been years since I actually did a Thanksgiving dinner like you're supposed to, I have started in recent years to roast me a cuisse de dinde, with a few patates douce - and then I throw in a side of brussels sprouts, which I admit come from the Christmas dinner I had my year spent in the UK. Have a couple meals from the turkey leg, then make a big pot of turkey-noodle soup from the remains.

But for our 'Merrican folks here - are you doing anything for the Big Day? If so, what substitutes have you found for the usual spread?

Turkeys here are definitely smaller (and not pumped up with butter or other fat injected under the skin). Better for fitting into Euro-sized ovens, and actually (IMO at least) better tasting.

Cranberries can be hard to find here - at least until a couple of weeks before Christmas - but I know they grow the things up in the Netherlands.

Sweet potatoes are no problem - but if you like them with the marshmallows (I definitely DON'T) where do you get your marshmallows?

I make my pumpkin pie in a quiche pan and it turns out just fine. Homemade "puree de potiron" is simple enough to make and the rest of the ingredients are easy to find (eggs, milk or cream, spices, cognac and finely chopped candied ginger in my recipe...).

So, how are you doing your Thanksgiving this year?
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Bev and her fellow Americans

As a Brit I wish you all well on your Thanksgiving Day.

Years ago as a consultant I had a small TV / cable company as a client. Most of the key employees were US, including the CEO. The company observed both UK and US public holidays. The company served a Thanksgiving lunch in the canteen on the day before. Frankly I felt proud to be invited into what was a very US centric festivity.

DejW
 

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Bev and her fellow Americans

As a Brit I wish you all well on your Thanksgiving Day.

Years ago as a consultant I had a small TV / cable company as a client. Most of the key employees were US, including the CEO. The company observed both UK and US public holidays. The company served a Thanksgiving lunch in the canteen on the day before. Frankly I felt proud to be invited into what was a very US centric festivity.

DejW
Yes, Happy Thanksgiving to all fellow Americans - we used to celebrate by doing a UK Christmas dinner as neither of us can stand pumpkin or corn bread. That way we got two Christmas dinners a year :D

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...Cranberries can be hard to find here - at least until a couple of weeks before Christmas - but I know they grow the things up in the Netherlands...
Last Xmas, we decided to invite several neighbors for a "near-to-Xmas" lunch with a US-style meal. We bought a whole turkey (yes, smaller, WAY more expensive, and far better tasting), and found most of the things we wanted. Except cranberry sauce.

We found some demi-seche cranberries at our Sunday marché. My wife cooked them, which rehydrated them, and added some juice and sugar to make the sauce. She made it a touch spicy, too, which I fell in love with. Not your average jellied Ocean Spray cranberry sauce in a can. Our older neighbors enjoyed the meal and were completely baffled by the cranberry dish.

In retrospect, I think the overfull table / over-the-top nature of American meals (which we never do in France but did do for that lunch) might have buried some of the dishes and they simply got lost...like the cranberries. Had we served courses, one of which featured the cranberry sauce, it might have made more sense.

I, however, am requesting them again this year! They were terrific.

Happy holidays.

Ray
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ah, the only cranberry "sauce" I do anymore is the one where you grind up a sack of cranberries (probably down to 10 oz. these days, even in the US) with a whole orange (peel and all) and add some sugar. Let it sit for an hour or two in the fridge and it's ready to go!

They sell little pots (well, jars, actually) of cranberry sauce in the "exotic" foods aisle at our Auchan and, I think, at SuperU lately, too.

But I'm making a pumpkin pie (with pumpkin from the garden) for our Repas des aniers, set for the Sunday after Thanksgiving. The menu is a bit different, but it's "my" Thanksgiving here. Raucous, noisy, lots of food, lots of telling of stories (about our donkeys or not). Lots of laughter and good times. THAT'S the real idea behind Thanksgiving!
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate it!

Whether you're coping overseas, or back in the States with a full traditional spread, a very happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate the holiday!
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Whether you're coping overseas, or back in the States with a full traditional spread, a very happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate the holiday!
Cheers,
Bev
Happy Thanksgiving Bev,

"coping in Wales"
 

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Happy Thanksgiving Bev, and a special thank you for all the info and encouragement you give all year long to those of us working towards a life in France!
 
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