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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Those moving to Mexico, or tourists visiting Mexico may temporarily import their vehicle into Mexico, as in the past. These vehicles may never be sold in Mexico, even for parts, and must eventually be removed from the country, even if they no longer run. That has not changed.

However, an unofficial but usually reliable source has just reported that permanent importation (nationalization) by individuals has been stopped. I have no other information at this time.
 

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Would this be an over simplification?

Those moving to Mexico, or tourists visiting Mexico may temporarily import their vehicle into Mexico, as in the past. These vehicles may never be sold in Mexico, even for parts, and must eventually be removed from the country, even if they no longer run. That has not changed.

However, an unofficial but usually reliable source has just reported that permanent importation (nationalization) by individuals has been stopped. I have no other information at this time.
If one has a personal vehicle in Mexico while residing there with one of the three Visas, then the new ruling would mean that at some point before the vehicle stopped running it should be removed from the country?

Is it that simple or am I missing a whole bag of nuances?

Thanks, RVGringo
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That has always been the case and it saves a lot of headaches if a vehicle can simply be driven back to the USA and sold or otherwise disposed of. One must be sure to have 'Aduana' remove the sticker and give the owner a receipt showing that the vehicle has been removed from Mexico. Then, you can temporarily import another or hop a bus home and buy a car in Mexico.
We have a US plated, Japanese manufactured car that could never be imported permanently under any of the previous rules. Some day, we'll have to take it north. We also have a car purchased in Mexico and registered in Jalisco. Although the taxes and registration are more expensive, it makes life simpler; even when crossing the border to go to the USA. However, should we ever decide to leave Mexico for the USA, that car cannot be imported permanently to the USA. It works both ways.
 

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time limit for removing a car

Is there a time limit by which I have to remove the car from the country if I am on a visitors visa, with no FM3? Or can I keep a car there indefinitely but EVENTUALLY bring it out when I am finished with it? (afew years later)
On another note, can I buy a car in Mexico if I do not have an FM3?
 

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Is there a time limit by which I have to remove the car from the country if I am on a visitors visa, with no FM3? Or can I keep a car there indefinitely but EVENTUALLY bring it out when I am finished with it? (afew years later)
On another note, can I buy a car in Mexico if I do not have an FM3?
On an FMT, visitors visa, when you leave the country, the vehicle has to leave the country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bournemouth is correct. If you are visiting Mexico on an FMT tourist permit, you may temporarily import your vehicle only for the time that your FMT remains valid; a maximum of 180 days. The FMT may not be renewed and you and the vehicle must leave the country. Only people with FM3 or FM2 Visas may come and go with, or without their vehicle.
In order to purchase a vehicle in Mexico, most states will require you to have an FM3 or FM2 Visa along with they necessary proofs of address and a driver's license.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A vehicle in the country illegally is subject to permanent confiscation. Should it be stolen and driven by a Mexican, it would be confiscated and the owner would become 'wanted'. If it was involved in an accident and caused damage, injury or death, the owner would be held liable and would be subject to all of the legal remedies; confiscation of property, imprisonment, fines, deportation, etc.
Therefore, it isn't a good idea to violate the law and the rules of this forum prohibit encouraging such activity.
 

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Okeedoekee....I get the picuture! Does leaving a car which is registered against your passport also effect tourist visa applications in the future?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It could, but there is no definitive answer except that it can all depend upon the efficiency of the computer records, your vehicle VIN and Passport Number, etc.
I can only suggest that it might be wise to ask your nearest Mexican Consulate for advice before traveling. They might be able to cancel the FM3 through INM and that would allow entry on an FMT sometime after that date. If he could travel on an FMT for a while, then he might be able to apply for a new FM3 once he has made himself and the vehicle 'legal again'.
I'm afraid I can't offer any other suggestions, other than being honest and open about it and paying the fines.
 

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We have a US plated, Japanese manufactured car that could never be imported permanently under any of the previous rules. Some day, we'll have to take it north.

Hi RVGringo,

With your US car, do you have to take it north every year anyway, to renew the registration where you are from? At least where I am from, a yearly inspection is required to renew the registration, which would mean driving back to my home state once a year. I believe in another post you said that, even if your car importation permit is valid for six months or whatever through your tourist visa, it is NOT considered valid, if your US registration has expired. Is that correct?

I wonder if other states do not have this requirement, and if, for example, I could register my car in Arizona or Texas and simply go there for the yearly re-register. However, I doubt I can without being able to prove residence in that state.

Were you able to confirm the news you were told about no longer being able to nationalize vehicles? This is still a valid link on the Gov't customs website, even though it is apparently from 2008.
http://www.aduanas.sat.gob.mx/aduana_mexico/2008/vehiculos/141_10039.html
Nothing more updated is there. I would like to have the most updated information possible.

If I cannot feasibly drive back to my home state to re-register my car every year, or register in a border state, or legalize the car, what are my alternatives? Can I even buy a Mexican car on an FMT, or only on an FM3?

Thanks!!!
 

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P.S. - ok after scouring the forum, it looks like you can only buy a Mexican car if you have an FM2 or 3. Plus, I would have to pay taxes yearly (is this so on a legalized car?). If the legalization process is still around, it would be ideal, because I can buy a ten year old car and bring it in (I don't mind paying one time taxes of several hundred or thousand dollars) - but are there yearly taxes beyond that? I really hope they did not do away with nationalization.

Otherwise, I just don't know how I would get around the re-registration. If other words, if a cop sees the sticker on your car says 2009 and it's 2010...they will confiscate the car? Even if your vehicle importation and visa are still currently valid?
 

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Hi RVGringo,

With your US car, do you have to take it north every year anyway, to renew the registration where you are from? At least where I am from, a yearly inspection is required to renew the registration, which would mean driving back to my home state once a year. I believe in another post you said that, even if your car importation permit is valid for six months or whatever through your tourist visa, it is NOT considered valid, if your US registration has expired. Is that correct?

I wonder if other states do not have this requirement, and if, for example, I could register my car in Arizona or Texas and simply go there for the yearly re-register. However, I doubt I can without being able to prove residence in that state.

Were you able to confirm the news you were told about no longer being able to nationalize vehicles? This is still a valid link on the Gov't customs website, even though it is apparently from 2008.
Vehículos - Vehículos usados año-modelo entre 10 y 15 años - SAT México
Nothing more updated is there. I would like to have the most updated information possible.

If I cannot feasibly drive back to my home state to re-register my car every year, or register in a border state, or legalize the car, what are my alternatives? Can I even buy a Mexican car on an FMT, or only on an FM3?

Thanks!!!
I talked to 2 different Dept. of Motor Vehicle offices in Arizona and they both confirmed that you DO NOT have to be a resident of, or have a license from, Arizona in order to register a car there. I think they did say that I had to have an address there, but do not have to reside at that address. My brother lives there so I will use his address. good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Where one registers their car in the US or Canada is another topic. Briefly; there are states which allow it, as mentioned above. Some have no inspection or heavy tax requirements, while others make it near impossible.
The last that I've heard on permanent importation is that even the usual brokers are confused and many aren't doing it any more because of the high costs, which just aren't worth it for a ten year old car. Remember, also, that the car must have been manufactured in a NAFTA country and be exactly the right age. It seems, for all practical purposes, that it isn't worth it. There are more makes and models of cars in Mexico than one can imagine, new or used.
 

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Okeedoekee....I get the picuture! Does leaving a car which is registered against your passport also effect tourist visa applications in the future?
I've found that Mexico issues the Vehicle Permits based on the number of the document used to prove identity.

In 2001, my wife wrecked my 2000 Ford Explorer. It was taken by wrecker to the impound in Nuevo Laredo.

To retrieve it, I would have needed the title, which the vehicle being financed, I didn't have, so decided to let FMAC take care of it.

I'd just gotten a new vehicle permit shortly before the accident happened. When I went to get another one, they keyed the number of my birth certificate in, which I'd used to identify myself, saw there was an outstanding permit, and refused to issue another, until the old one was returned.

I explained the situation to them, and the options they gave me were to drive the vehicle to the aduanales to return the permit, have the vehicle towed there for the same purpose, none which was possible.

So I waited a week, and went back with my Texas voter registration, drivers license, renewed my FMT and obtained another vehicle permit under my voter registration number.

I've never had a problem since then.

I don't know if the VIN would come back to bite you as my transactions involved three different vehicles at various times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You have violated your original bond. As such, you have a potential problem in the future but the odds are on your side if the original vehicle was totally destroyed. If it wasn't, and if it is repaired and driven, you would be traced by the VIN and held responsible in the event of an accident which injured someone or damaged public property. At that time, your violation of your original bond would be discovered and you could be fined up to the value of the Explorer at that time, plus other fines.
Your first mistake was possibly taking the Explorer into Mexico without the written permission of the lien holder, then knowingly bringing in a second vehicle after the accident. Now, with the passport requirement and much better Mexican computer control of vehicles, you wouldn't be able to get away with that again.
 

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Purchasing a vehicle in Mexico

Hello. I just bought a condo in Barra de Navidad and want to purchase a vehicle to leave there. So after reading the thread I understand:

On an FMT I CAN NOT buy a vehicle in Mexico and plate it with Mexican plates.

On an FM2 or FM3 I CAN BUY a vehicle in Mexico and plate it with Mexican plates. (It sounds to me that this is the best option)

If I bring a vehicle in with me to Mexico on an FMT the vehicle MUST leave with me when I leave and turn in my FMT.

Once I have an FM3 I am still unclear whether I can bring a vehicle in to Mexico that is 10 years old or older and plate it with Mexican plates.

Presently I was thinking of buying a vehicle from an American that currently has it in Mexico (PV to be exact), but if I understand correctly, they CAN NOT legally sell that vehicle in Mexico.

Lastly, does anyone know whether or not in small towns like Malaque or Barra de Navidad you can buy either a quad, or a golf cart in Mexico and register it in Mexico? This would be a great option for running around town. Again, what if a quad or golf cart were bought from an American or Canadian that had brought it in with them?

Thanks in advance from the Newbie.

Dwight
 

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I believe you are correct on those assumptions. I did bring a 50CC scooter in with no paperwork required, although it is a rough ride in Melaque or Barra with those cobbled streets.
 
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