Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello there,

I am a New Zealand trained primary school teacher who is considering moving to Dubai to teach in an international school, and am looking for some information as to how teaching in Dubai compares to teaching in New Zealand.

I'd be interested in the curriculum, and whether lessons are preset or you have the room to add your own creativity. Also, what hours do teachers work, including planning and extracurricular activities.

Any information about personal experiences would be much appreciated and very helpful and helping to make my decision about whether I do indeed take that leap.

Look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks.
Becca :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,657 Posts
There have been a lot of recent threads about schools and teaching, so I suggest you do a search as you should find useful information.

-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the information. I will go and do a search now and see what I can find. How exciting! Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Hi there....some advice...
Be prepared that schools here are private and they want to make money. Decent headteachers have time for you, but everyting you ask for and need is SLOW. Take as many resources as you have from back home-I made the mistake of thinking that a new, private school will have all the resources I need-wrong. I came from an inner city London school (which are supposed to be bad), and was far better resourced than out here.
Working hours are similar, though I find we don't get breaks during the day and you do have to do after school activities (but these go quick). Not sure how the UK compares to NZ, but I'm sure it's similar.
Good luck!



Hello there,

I am a New Zealand trained primary school teacher who is considering moving to Dubai to teach in an international school, and am looking for some information as to how teaching in Dubai compares to teaching in New Zealand.

I'd be interested in the curriculum, and whether lessons are preset or you have the room to add your own creativity. Also, what hours do teachers work, including planning and extracurricular activities.

Any information about personal experiences would be much appreciated and very helpful and helping to make my decision about whether I do indeed take that leap.

Look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks.
Becca :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello there,

Thanks so much for your reply. Can I ask you to expand a little? What sort of resources do the schools actually have and what specifically would you advise would be useful to take (coming from NZ my luggage will be minimal).

When you say working hours are similar do school days start at 9am and finish at 3pm (around abouts) with an hour for lunch (which it sounds like you don't get?)

When you refer to after school activities are you referring to mainly sports?

I have heard that teaching schedules are generally prewritten by the schools and that the content of lessons is very prescribed (lessons being generally straight from books) without much room for teachers to add their own content/style. Is this the case?

How long have you been orking in Dubai for and honestly, are you enjoying it?

Thanks again for your message and I hope to hear from you again.

Becca :)


Hi there....some advice...
Be prepared that schools here are private and they want to make money. Decent headteachers have time for you, but everyting you ask for and need is SLOW. Take as many resources as you have from back home-I made the mistake of thinking that a new, private school will have all the resources I need-wrong. I came from an inner city London school (which are supposed to be bad), and was far better resourced than out here.
Working hours are similar, though I find we don't get breaks during the day and you do have to do after school activities (but these go quick). Not sure how the UK compares to NZ, but I'm sure it's similar.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
It really does depend on the school you're working for.
I found the worse problem with resources are:
1. Books-there are no reading corners or story time at the end of the day
2. Displays to put up-no backing paper etc.
3. No Colour printers in school
4. Practical resources-ie. you teach the time, you'd want some clocks! Counting and adding, but no cubes.
5. Lots of children in a small class

The working day for me is, get up at 5.30, leave t 6.30 finish school at the contracted time of 3.45 but take work home (school starts at 7.45, with 20 min break in the morning, 10 min in the afternoon, no actual lunch time).
After school activities is decided on what you want to offer, but you would normally do 2 a week.

This all sounds bad, but it's not that bad, it depends on why you are coming to Duabai! With feedback you will normally get the negatives rather than the positives.




QUOTE=Kiwi Becca;224121]Hello there,

Thanks so much for your reply. Can I ask you to expand a little? What sort of resources do the schools actually have and what specifically would you advise would be useful to take (coming from NZ my luggage will be minimal).

When you say working hours are similar do school days start at 9am and finish at 3pm (around abouts) with an hour for lunch (which it sounds like you don't get?)

When you refer to after school activities are you referring to mainly sports?

I have heard that teaching schedules are generally prewritten by the schools and that the content of lessons is very prescribed (lessons being generally straight from books) without much room for teachers to add their own content/style. Is this the case?

How long have you been orking in Dubai for and honestly, are you enjoying it?

Thanks again for your message and I hope to hear from you again.

Becca :)[/QUOTE]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
On the positive side (I work at the same school as rjs80) compared to the UK, classroom behaviour is miles better, the social life tends to be much better (lots of teachers without pre-existing friendship groups looking to get out and blow off the cobwebs each weekend) and (and I know this is entirely subjective) it seems a lot less stressful. This is very, very much just the opinion of one teacher in one school though - it will vary greatly with others! Best of luck anyway!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Dannysigma :) It's really neat hearing about different experiences, the good, the bad and the ugly. Good to know about the resources though as I wouldn't have thought to ask necessarily.

One thing I am interested about is something people refer to as "wasta" (is that correct?). Behaviour management is something that comes hand in hand with teaching here in NZ and I assume everywhere else. I get the impression if you say what is perceived as the "wrong thing" to the "wrong child" in UAE you can end up in jail and deported. Eeeek!! Can you give me the low down on this?

Sounds like you enjoy it. Great to hear :)

On the positive side (I work at the same school as rjs80) compared to the UK, classroom behaviour is miles better, the social life tends to be much better (lots of teachers without pre-existing friendship groups looking to get out and blow off the cobwebs each weekend) and (and I know this is entirely subjective) it seems a lot less stressful. This is very, very much just the opinion of one teacher in one school though - it will vary greatly with others! Best of luck anyway!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Never heard of wasta (though I am secondary and UK trained). Behaviour management should come hand in hand with teaching. As for saying the wrong thing to the wrong kid - I haven't heard of any such instances. I suppose with it being a private system, the parents are customers and expect to be treated differently than in state systems, but I don't think there's anything that could land you in jail. I guess common sense should prevail...

And, yes, I am enjoying teaching (and life!) for the first time in years. Coming here was the best move I've ever made. Apart from marrying my wife of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Didn't mean to sound so negative-I do enjoy it and would have left by now if I didn't....it was just a bit of a shock when first starting work. If I was you I would start applying for jobs and then find out about specific schools who will interview you/offer you a job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,657 Posts
Never heard of wasta (though I am secondary and UK trained). Behaviour management should come hand in hand with teaching. As for saying the wrong thing to the wrong kid - I haven't heard of any such instances. I suppose with it being a private system, the parents are customers and expect to be treated differently than in state systems, but I don't think there's anything that could land you in jail. I guess common sense should prevail...

And, yes, I am enjoying teaching (and life!) for the first time in years. Coming here was the best move I've ever made. Apart from marrying my wife of course.
Wasta is an Arabic word and can be trasnlated as influence, clout or connections. We generally describe someone as having wasta if they are influential enough to be able to bypass normal rules or are able to have pressure exerted to make something happen, whether for good or bad.
-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wasta from what I can gather is the hierarchy of family status. It did seem a little extreme from what I have heard so far but you are right...surely common sense prevails.

That is fabulous to hear you are enjoying your experiences so much and yayyy you for finding that special lady.

I think teaching in NZ is very similar to teaching in the UK so thank you for your insight on how you find Dubai :)

Never heard of wasta (though I am secondary and UK trained). Behaviour management should come hand in hand with teaching. As for saying the wrong thing to the wrong kid - I haven't heard of any such instances. I suppose with it being a private system, the parents are customers and expect to be treated differently than in state systems, but I don't think there's anything that could land you in jail. I guess common sense should prevail...

And, yes, I am enjoying teaching (and life!) for the first time in years. Coming here was the best move I've ever made. Apart from marrying my wife of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh no rjs80 I didn't take your comments as negative at all, just the reality and good to know as it is something I need to be aware of researching in relation to any schools where I may be offered a position. I appreciate your honesty :) It's great to hear lots of positives but I also need to know the things to be aware of.

I could ask 100 people the same question and everyone would have something different to say...it's what makes us individuals.

Cheers
Becca :)

Didn't mean to sound so negative-I do enjoy it and would have left by now if I didn't....it was just a bit of a shock when first starting work. If I was you I would start applying for jobs and then find out about specific schools who will interview you/offer you a job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks Elphaba that is what I was kind of trying to say (I think, lol) :)

Wasta is an Arabic word and can be trasnlated as influence, clout or connections. We generally describe someone as having wasta if they are influential enough to be able to bypass normal rules or are able to have pressure exerted to make something happen, whether for good or bad.
-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Wasta is an Arabic word and can be trasnlated as influence, clout or connections. We generally describe someone as having wasta if they are influential enough to be able to bypass normal rules or are able to have pressure exerted to make something happen, whether for good or bad.
-
Ah thanks for that Elphaba. That makes a lot of sense. I can imagine that possibly being the case in some of the very expensive and prestigious schools where the children of those with wasta (is that the correct context?) go, but it isn't the case in our school. Again, there is a possibility that it could happen in other schools, very much depending on the headteacher's attitude, but then I have never taught anywhere in the world where most of the teaching experience didn't depend upon the headteacher's attitude. Personally, I wouldn't worry too much. If you are unlucky enough to end up at a school you can't stand (happened to me enough times in the UK!) stay for a year, chalk it up to experience then move along. As the old chestnut goes: it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't...
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top