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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody!

I found this forum after doing a few google searches and thought there was some great information so I decided to sign up!

I'm a young New Zealander (in my early 20's) who is very keen to teach English in Spain. I have researched a fair amount into this and it seems like a great option for me. The demand for native English speakers is extremely high around the world these days and I have been told that with a TEFL certificate, I will have no problems finding a teaching job in Spain. This will give me a great opportunity to live in Spain, travel a bit and also hopefully integrate with the locals. It is not a job that is going to earn me a lot of money but it will cover expenses and hopefully it will be a great experience.

I'm curious if there may be anybody on this forum has taught English before or if anyone here has any advice in general? The prospect of moving to the other-side of the world at a reasonably young age is pretty daunting. I luckily have a European passport as my parents are English so this should make working easier. I have heard nightmare stories about trying to get Visa's in Spain (typically from Americans).

Would it be better to try and teach in smaller areas in Spain or the larger cities? I hear that the largest teaching market for us is Madrid and this may be a good option but I feel that it would be harder to mix with the locals in such a diverse, large city.

Thanks for any tips and advice in advance!
 

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Spain has a fair few British already there will and able to do that kind of work, so it wont be easy, especially as theres mass unemployment and if you're in New Zealand at the moment??

Jo xxx
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Jojo!

Thanks for your reply, I appreciate the response.

I have researched it quite extensively and I completely agree with you that the mass unemployment is a huge problem in Spain. However, apparently there are over 1 billion people around the world wanting to learn English and there is currently not nearly enough demand to meet that expectation from what I've heard/researched. The current unemployment in Spain has also increased the need for Spanish people to learn English to survive and seek more employment opportunities, especially in big international corporations that operate in English around the world. I haven't yet heard of any English teachers who have failed to find work in Spain and I've read a lot of stories.. but maybe I'm looking in the wrong place? From what I've read, the English teaching market in Spain is still very strong and there is an annual turnover of teachers in January and September as most English teachers only teach abroad for a year. So apparently there is a big hiring period during these months.

I have a EU passport so I think this may make living/working in Spain easier? I have a British passport due to my parents nationalities.

I may have been researching the wrong information? I hope I don't seem rude, I really don't intend to be rude at all!

Thanks again for the response and nice to meet you Jojo! :)
 

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The UK passport will make it easier but will by no means guarantee work.
Still, you're young with no ties so there's nothing to stop you trying. Make sure you have savings, enough to live on for a few months and funds put aside for an escape plan though, just in case.
Actually if you taught German you'd probably get more work. Germany is where a huge number are heading to, from Spain. There's work there
 

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I work in a language academy in the Seville area, and I can tell you that this year the director of the academy had a devil of a time finding qualified native teachers. So I would say that in this area there are jobs, as long as you have a TEFL qualification and especially if you have experience too. But the bulk of the hiring is done in the late spring for the following school year. There is a bit of turnover throughout the school year, but not much. So you need to time your job search right. Good luck!
 

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I think there are plenty of opportunities for teaching English in Spain, but whether you can make a decent living from it is another matter! Here in Madrid, despite what you may hear from others and various reports in the media, I can confirm that rates are going down. Although I earn substantially more than my counterparts in the north and south of the country I am earning less than 2 years ago. I actually negotiated the price per hour with a client last week who were desperate for teachers to do an intensive course. In the end they went up a further 10 euros an hour, so you can imagine what they were offering to start with!!
The biggest growth area is kids and this is not a well paid area. Companies who have survived the crisis have often done so by expanding and exporting abroad or they have been taken over by foreign enterprises and therefore need English. The problem I'm finding with company classes is that the government offers free or cheap courses to both the unemployed and companies so they are squeezing out the self employed teachers. Also, a lot of the time these companies don't have a lot of extra money to spend so they want English cheapo and fasto.
However, as a young single person I think you can still get work, rent a room in a house, get valuable experience and have fun.
 

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. However, apparently there are over 1 billion people around the world wanting to learn English and there is currently not nearly enough demand to meet that expectation from what I've heard/researched. The current unemployment in Spain has also increased the need for Spanish people to learn English to survive and seek more employment opportunities,
How many of that billion live in Spain?

If you're a parent with a teenage/twenty something kid that needs to learn English it's not that hard to stick the kid on a plane for London .


The kid will have a chance of finding a job. English speaking friends.

If the family is well off then the kid doesn't even need to find a job.
 

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How many of that billion live in Spain?

If you're a parent with a teenage/twenty something kid that needs to learn English it's not that hard to stick the kid on a plane for London .


The kid will have a chance of finding a job. English speaking friends.

If the family is well off then the kid doesn't even need to find a job.
I don't think learning English is as easy as that for many neither economically nor intellectually. Nor is it easy to get a job and make friends.

Yes a lot of kids spend some time during the summer abroad. Yes, a lot try their luck after uni. I know of a girl who was doing pretty badly at school, went to the UK to do the working in hotels bit, ended up staying there for 10 years and has now been living in Benidorm with her English partner and daughter for about 5 years. She's now fluent. I also know of a group of 4 thirty somethings who did the same for a couple of years, who never got beyond a low intermediate level and left to go back to the Basque country. A couple got work on the ferries that also ended after a couple of years.
 

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It's not that the cost is easy for everybody but the people that can afford an expensive course can afford other choices.

The OP talks about a billion people. A part of those can afford other choices.

OTOH The people that need work. Need work. With basically 30% unemployment just learning English isn't going to move a person far up the list. So some of them are just going to emigrate .

So that billion pretty quickly gets cut down.
 

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Teaching in Spain

Hi there.

I have been living in Seville now for 3 years and I can tell you you that there is a demand here for Spanish people to learn English. I live with a school teacher and when she is not at her full time job, she is teaching business classes or just conversation classes for about 20 euros p/h.

The demand was so high for business classes earlier this year that I was even asked by my partner if I would teach 3 architects English classes, as she did not have the time to do it. I have never taught English before in my life and it was very daunting, but after a while, the classes got easier as a rapport developed between my students and myself. I eventually ended up teaching 29 lessons (1.5 hours twice a week) and it was very rewarding.

I would definitely take a good look at Seville as I know a heap of school teachers and they all seem to do OK for themselves. Most of them have been here for 2 years or more as they still manage to get work year after year. They are mostly TEFL trained and if you want to do the course here, it will cost you about 600-800 euros and will take about 6 weeks. They will then find you work. The cost of living here is dead cheap and a one bedroom apartment will cost you about 400 euros p/m. Sharing is definitely an option if you want your accommodation costs to be about 200 euros p/m.. Have a look on the Spanish website " segundomano " for accommodation in Seville.

Also, the girl who runs the TEFL course here is a good friend of ours so I could put you in touch with her, if you so wish. Overall, Seville in my opinion would be an excellent start for any would be school teacher as the city is downright stunningly beautiful, the locals are excessively friendly, the weather is glorious and the culture here is through the roof.
One more thing, most of the teachers I know all hang out in an Irish Pub called "The Phoenix" in Triana, across the other side of the river from the Cathedral. The bar is owned by a lovely New Zealander called 'Peter', who I know quite well cos that's where I drink too.

Anyway, I hope that my info. was helpful and good luck with your decision.

Cheers!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey guys, thanks so much for the responses. I appreciate all the advice and input!

Once again based on the research I've done, I don't think finding work will be too hard as long as I have my TEFL certificate. I hope I'm not being a tad arrogant and ignorant but I still haven't heard of anyone who hasn't found English teaching work as a native speaker. I think I'll take my chance and go for it! Obviously it's not something you make loads of money from but at my age it would be a fantastic gateway to live abroad, travel, gain experience in all sorts of ways without losing any/much money.

I'm excited by the prospect. However it will be a big challenge for me. Admittedly I have never lived away from home (I know, how embarrassing!). The reason for this is that my home in NZ is so close to the university and I decided to stay at home, save a HEAP of money (at this stage I am fortunate to have no student loan) and work part time while studying. Worked out well for me, but will be a big change if I make the leap of faith.

I guess one of my main concerns is loneliness abroad. I would HATE to be in a foreign country without any friends and feeling miserable. I have no problem interacting with all kinds of people and I will put some serious work into Spanish (I already have a decent level of Spanish ability but need to improve) so that I can interact with the locals.

Does anyone have any tips for forming social circles and making new friends in a completely new country?

Thanks again guys, appreciate it! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Dozzle,

Thanks for the advice!

My mate from school went to Seville and said he had an unbelievable time! He couldn't believe how crazy the street festivals were and how cheap the food/alcohol was.

I think Seville could be a good place to look at.

Peter sounds like a good guy! I've heard us New Zealanders tend to have a reputation overseas as being a very friendly bunch! I guess we are known for that, the All Blacks, and the fact that we have over 10 times as many sheep as people haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
How many of that billion live in Spain?

If you're a parent with a teenage/twenty something kid that needs to learn English it's not that hard to stick the kid on a plane for London .


The kid will have a chance of finding a job. English speaking friends.

If the family is well off then the kid doesn't even need to find a job.
Hey Nick,

I think that the majority of people in Spain especially (given the severe unemployment crisis) and around the world for that matter would seriously struggle to fund their children to live in a different country just to learn English. It is much much much affordable for the average parents to pay a certain fee for their children to learn English in their home country through a school or academy than fly them to an English speaking country and cover all of the additional expenses that would be there. It is much cheaper for families to live together and the cost of living is lower when people live in groups and living alone is often very expensive. Many people cannot afford this. However, I agree with you to an extent and I imagine there would be a certain proportion that would send their kids overseas.

I entertained the idea of studying abroad to my parents when I was younger and the cost of a one year exchange at a Spanish high school seemed to be about 20,000 New Zealand dollars (12000 Euros I think). This is a significant fee and is much more than I would cost living with my family at home. My family lives a pretty comfortable life I would say and my parents have good jobs but 20k would have taken a big hit on the family budget!

If the kid is working overseas than that is a completely different issue though and I would absolutely agree with you!

Thanks mate!
 

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Hey guys, thanks so much for the responses. I appreciate all the advice and input!

Once again based on the research I've done, I don't think finding work will be too hard as long as I have my TEFL certificate. I hope I'm not being a tad arrogant and ignorant but I still haven't heard of anyone who hasn't found English teaching work as a native speaker. I think I'll take my chance and go for it! Obviously it's not something you make loads of money from but at my age it would be a fantastic gateway to live abroad, travel, gain experience in all sorts of ways without losing any/much money.

I'm excited by the prospect. However it will be a big challenge for me. Admittedly I have never lived away from home (I know, how embarrassing!). The reason for this is that my home in NZ is so close to the university and I decided to stay at home, save a HEAP of money (at this stage I am fortunate to have no student loan) and work part time while studying. Worked out well for me, but will be a big change if I make the leap of faith.

I guess one of my main concerns is loneliness abroad. I would HATE to be in a foreign country without any friends and feeling miserable. I have no problem interacting with all kinds of people and I will put some serious work into Spanish (I already have a decent level of Spanish ability but need to improve) so that I can interact with the locals.

Does anyone have any tips for forming social circles and making new friends in a completely new country?

Thanks again guys, appreciate it! :)
Hi - I have to admit to being rather partial to KiWis, generally, having found those I've met to be, in almost every case, friendly, open and outgoing (I know I'm stereo-typing, but positively so..!). In any case, none of them seems to have suffered from a lack of friends here, LOL!

I'd endorse everything you've been told, so far, re. the opportunities waiting for you, here in SW Spain, as a qualified TEFL teacher (note; the TEFL qualification is key..!).

if you do decide to base yourself in Seville, be sure to pay a visit to the city of Cadiz, two hours further South by train - and on the coast! Cadiz, too, is tailor-made for young travellers and those who wish to stay a while, either for study or cutural purposes. The local people are incredibly helpful and friendly, despite their having been hit so hard by the terrible effects of the current economic crisis! Seville would, however, certainly be the better choice for English teaching opportunities, just now, given its larger population.

My advice, with respect to both cities, would be to spend some time in the bars where young teachers and other young people of all nationalities hang out; go to a few live music events (music fans are very welcoming, as i can testify..!) and, if possible, join an 'Intercambio 'group in which to practise Spanish, albeit in the context of a sympathetic, social group - ours, in Cadiz, is very well attended and has helped many new arrivals make their first new friends here!

Good luck with planning your adventure - you'll have a great time - but, do make sure you've got all the necessary support systems in place (Healthcare,finances/insurances etc.) before you leave NZ!

Saludos,
GC
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi - I have to admit to being rather partial to KiWis, generally, having found those I've met to be, in almost every case, friendly, open and outgoing (I know I'm stereo-typing, but positively so..!). In any case, none of them seems to have suffered from a lack of friends here, LOL!

I'd endorse everything you've been told, so far, re. the opportunities waiting for you, here in SW Spain, as a qualified TEFL teacher (note; the TEFL qualification is key..!).

if you do decide to base yourself in Seville, be sure to pay a visit to the city of Cadiz, two hours further South by train - and on the coast! Cadiz, too, is tailor-made for young travellers and those who wish to stay a while, either for study or cutural purposes. The local people are incredibly helpful and friendly, despite their having been hit so hard by the terrible effects of the current economic crisis! Seville would, however, certainly be the better choice for English teaching opportunities, just now, given its larger population.

My advice, with respect to both cities, would be to spend some time in the bars where young teachers and other young people of all nationalities hang out; go to a few live music events (music fans are very welcoming, as i can testify..!) and, if possible, join an 'Intercambio 'group in which to practise Spanish, albeit in the context of a sympathetic, social group - ours, in Cadiz, is very well attended and has helped many new arrivals make their first new friends here!

Good luck with planning your adventure - you'll have a great time - but, do make sure you've got all the necessary support systems in place (Healthcare,finances/insurances etc.) before you leave NZ!

Saludos,
GC
Hey GC, nice to meet you!

I have heard of Cadiz as another friend lived there and it looks like a great little city! I hear Granada is also very appealing and I am truly fascinated by the history revolving around Granada (I studied a little bit at university). Do you know if there are any teaching jobs in a small place like Cadiz by any chance/out of curiosity?

The healthcare issue you brought up is actually something I must look into. I hope this will not be a problem for me, but for 5-6 years I have battled with a form of arthritis in my back. It is unusual that I developed this about 15-16 years of age and I honestly don't talk about this with anyone (which is ironic now that I'm posting on an internet forum!). I do rely on medication to help me live a good/near normal quality of life albeit with a few restrictions (No high impact sports anymore like rugby! Tough being in such a rugby mad country, but I still play a bit of football and love it). Hopefully I can find a way around this problem but I imagine it could be a tricky situation.. Still my condition has NOT held me back, I look completely normal, no disability at all. Even if I can't get medication in Spain, I will find a way to get through as always. Maybe having a EU passport will help with the healthcare?

Thanks for the tips and advice :)
 

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Hey GC, nice to meet you!

I have heard of Cadiz as another friend lived there and it looks like a great little city! I hear Granada is also very appealing and I am truly fascinated by the history revolving around Granada (I studied a little bit at university). Do you know if there are any teaching jobs in a small place like Cadiz by any chance/out of curiosity?

The healthcare issue you brought up is actually something I must look into. I hope this will not be a problem for me, but for 5-6 years I have battled with a form of arthritis in my back. It is unusual that I developed this about 15-16 years of age and I honestly don't talk about this with anyone (which is ironic now that I'm posting on an internet forum!). I do rely on medication to help me live a good/near normal quality of life albeit with a few restrictions (No high impact sports anymore like rugby! Tough being in such a rugby mad country, but I still play a bit of football and love it). Hopefully I can find a way around this problem but I imagine it could be a tricky situation.. Still my condition has NOT held me back, I look completely normal, no disability at all. Even if I can't get medication in Spain, I will find a way to get through as always. Maybe having a EU passport will help with the healthcare?

Thanks for the tips and advice :)
the passport won't help get you healthcare

the only way you'll be able to access state healthcare is if you're working legally - that is either with a contract of employment or paying 'autónomo' self-employed SS payments
 

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Teachers I've talked to in Madrid recently tell me it has got tougher, but from what I can tell, there is still work around the place. If you want to teach in an academy then some of them used to run month long TEFL courses in September and then offer year long contracts to those who passed it. Not sure if it's still the case. Also there's the teaching assistant programme run with the British Council to consider. You might find there's more money to be made in Asia.
 

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There are several threads on here about teaching English (search for teaching English, TEFL, teaching in Spain etc) including this one about TEFL qualifications
http://www.expatforum.com/expats/sp...275194-teaching-barcelona-do-i-need-tefl.html
I agree with what people have said in that thread - do a CELTA or the Trinity qualification which you know are internationally recognised, have all the teaching practice that you need included and assure universely accepted standard.
 
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