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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi yall!
well update- Hubby will be leaving in 15 days to go home to UK :(....ugh
so i am proactively looking up what i can do to make this easier, and i have come across a website for expats as well., and found a whole topic on the taxes, wills, etc for an american expat. it is UK Yankee
I did not however find out how your supposed to do this when you are not earning in USA???? Are the income taxes for your income in the UK? Does this mean I will pay taxes in 2 places?
I am so lost in these types of things. Also, does this mean at retirement, i get a social security check as if i was in the USA?

And regarding wills, it said you must must must file the same exact will (better when you are there first) with uk and usa...but how????

Any way thanks yall!
 

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Boy, you are getting prepared!

Don't worry too much just yet about taxes and wills. As a US citizen, you will always be liable for filing a tax return with Uncle Sam. There is the Overseas Earned Income Exclusion, however, which allows you to exclude earned income (i.e. salary) made while living outside the US once you establish residence in the UK. You must file a return in order to claim the exclusion!

One tricky bit is that, as a US citizen married to a "non-resident alien" you should be filing as "married, filing separately" from overseas. That can cause some problems, including making 100% of your social security taxable once you start drawing it.

If you want to get into it now, just download a copy of Publication 54 from the IRS website. It looks complicated at first glance, but after the first year (which is complicated by the IRS residence requirements), it really gets pretty easy.

At retirement, you'll get a social security check if you have earned it (you only need 40 quarters, or 10 years of service to qualify). There is a social security treaty between the US and UK, so when you get a bit closer to time, you should contact the Social Security office at the US Embassy for more information.

As far as wills go, you normally fall under the laws of the country in which you are resident - except for any real property (i.e. land or buildings - sometimes called "immovable property") located outside the country. So, if you own a house in the US while living in the UK, you probably should have a will for each country. (The US will would only cover the house in the US. The UK will cover everything else.) If you don't own anything back in the US, you don't need a will back there.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Boy, you are getting prepared!

Don't worry too much just yet about taxes and wills. As a US citizen, you will always be liable for filing a tax return with Uncle Sam. There is the Overseas Earned Income Exclusion, however, which allows you to exclude earned income (i.e. salary) made while living outside the US once you establish residence in the UK. You must file a return in order to claim the exclusion!

One tricky bit is that, as a US citizen married to a "non-resident alien" you should be filing as "married, filing separately" from overseas. That can cause some problems, including making 100% of your social security taxable once you start drawing it.

If you want to get into it now, just download a copy of Publication 54 from the IRS website. It looks complicated at first glance, but after the first year (which is complicated by the IRS residence requirements), it really gets pretty easy.

At retirement, you'll get a social security check if you have earned it (you only need 40 quarters, or 10 years of service to qualify). There is a social security treaty between the US and UK, so when you get a bit closer to time, you should contact the Social Security office at the US Embassy for more information.

As far as wills go, you normally fall under the laws of the country in which you are resident - except for any real property (i.e. land or buildings - sometimes called "immovable property") located outside the country. So, if you own a house in the US while living in the UK, you probably should have a will for each country. (The US will would only cover the house in the US. The UK will cover everything else.) If you don't own anything back in the US, you don't need a will back there.
Cheers,
Bev
thanks bev!!!!
i guess im being over prepared?? idk just dont wanna mess anything up!
lol
thanks again doll!
Pepper xoxox
 
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