Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For the purposes of buying a home I would appreciate a reference for a home inspector or surveyor in western Umbria or eastern Tuscany unless this typically is handled some other way, e.g. by one's avvocato.

:flypig:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
Well it's certainly not like the UK where you can get a full and proper report. The "survey" we had here was a total waste of time and money!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's very disappointing. Is there any professional certification required (or recommended) for a home inspector or surveyor?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,465 Posts
Don't know what the situation is in Italy, but I can tell you that we often get the same question about buying property in France. The system here is simply different, and there doesn't seem to be a "profession" in France like that of surveyor or home inspector in the UK. There are certain documents and "certifications" that have to be included as part of the process of buying a home here - basically to assure that the property meets the local codes - but there is no real "inspection" process as such. It may be similar in Italy, I suspect.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
there doesn't seem to be a "profession" in France like that of surveyor or home inspector in the UK. There are certain documents and "certifications" that have to be included as part of the process of buying a home here - basically to assure that the property meets the local codes - but there is no real "inspection" process as such. It may be similar in Italy, I suspect.
Cheers,
Bev
I agree Bev, that this also applies to Italy. Certifications to assure the property meets the local codes are handled before the sale through the realtor. In this case he should find a realtor that speaks English. Before settlement a Notaio (notary) makes sure everything is in order with regard to the work of the realtor. Realtors can recommend their own Notaio or you can request your own (preferably one who speaks English in this case). That Notaio will also handle the settlement. Lawyers are not used in Italian real estate transactions nor are they used at settlemet. This is the job of the Notaio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmm. This is a quote from https://www.justlanded.com/english/Italy/Italy-Guide/Property/Inspections-Surveys :
An Italian wouldn’t make an offer on a property before at least having it checked by a builder. If a property is pre-1945, a builder or engineer ( ingegnere) can be employed to check it for soundness; an architect ( architetto) is usually better qualified to check a modern house (unless he designed it himself!). Alternatively, you can employ a professional valuer or geometra.

You can also have a full structural survey carried out, although this is rare in Italy. However, if you would have a survey carried out if you were buying the same property in your home country, you should have one done in Italy. You will usually need to pay around €300 for a ‘rough’ appraisal ( valutazione) and around €1,000 (depending on the work involved) for a ‘full’ structural survey ( perizia strutturale)
So ingenere, architetto, geometra, ... This is pretty detailed which generally implies that they know what they're talking about. As to what you get, I've found that getting a copy of what they've produced for someone else is a good guide to what you'd get.

So I guess I'm looking for a recommendation for a ingenere, architetto, or geometrain Umbria/Tuscany.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
Justlanded has been around quite some time and are great for information, but I just look on them as another forum and I'd be surprised if they don't here! One thing I would mention is the fact we read or were told that getting such done either negates the agents or the sellers legal responsibility regards the house (can't recall which), just something to be aware of...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wanted to "Thank" everyone who replied but apparently I've thanked you too much; the system wouldn't let me. I'm reduced to "Like"ing you. But thanks.

A friend who lived and taught near Trieste said that I wouldn't want to live in Italy because I would eventually get tired of pounding my head against the seemingly impenetrable obstacle called "trying to get things done". She may have been right.

So, does anyone have a recommendation for an English speaking lawyer, notary, surveyor, home inspector, or errand boy in western Umbria or eastern Tuscany who might translate and advise on renting or purchasing an apartment?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,887 Posts
First of all it's not true you can't use a lawyer. The thing is a lawyer works for one side of the transaction. The Notaio is neutral and works for both. At least supposedly.

The Notaio is required to make sure you understand. That will mean either you are fluent in Italian or have a translator of some sort.

One thing to check is the electrical system. If the service when installed was the standard 3kw the home owner would not have needed to file a plan . It's possible the system isn't even up to code. It may work fine for 3kw but if for whatever reason you want a higher load it might not.

Obviously in Umbria you should be looking at quake proofing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
It depends on what you're buying. If you're buying a flat, the building itself should be already up to code as it has been maintained by an Administrator so there would be no need for an inspector. The Administrator would advise on any recent or about to be done maintenance on the building itself. An architect would get involved if you decide to renovate your flat. In some cases a real estate company has bought up a number of flats in a building and renovated them before sale. In this case you would not need an inspector or an architect. You would only need the sale agent and the notaio.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top