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Im doing a month this january renting in old P.V. Been to Mexico many times but never have enjoyed been pestered by sellers of the same old stuff on the beaches or shopkeepers and timeshare people calling out to you. you feel rude not to answer but its nearly impossible to walk in peace and have a conversation with someone. Other than wearing headphones so it is obvious I cant hear them, are there any tricks that those who live there learn so that they are not constantly pestered? Im hoping to make PV my winter 3 month destination eventually, thats why im trying one month rental 1'st. Do the people selling all this stuff start to recognize you as a local and not a tourist, or do you wear a shirt that says "I live here" or something like that???
 

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The only way is to avoid the obvious tourist destinations. That does not happen nearly as much if you get off the beaten path.
 

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makes sense. i tried Cabo for 3 weeks last year, remember sitting there trying to enjoy the view from a beachside restaurant and every time I tried to look at the view a vendor would spot me and get in my line of view to try and make eye contact. I understand they are trying to make a living selling to the tourists, but it just gets stupid annoying. I'll find places off the beaten track hopefully, I'm sure just getting away from the beach/malecon in old pv will be much better.
 

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I wave my hands meaning that I don't want to buy anything and say, 'No, gracias!'
 
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I have learned to block out what some of the vendors are saying. We do stop and talk to some vendors who recognize us and have great conversations with them and also, sometimes, gain some valuable advice and information.
 

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Im doing a month this january renting in old P.V. Been to Mexico many times but never have enjoyed been pestered by sellers of the same old stuff on the beaches or shopkeepers and timeshare people calling out to you. you feel rude not to answer but its nearly impossible to walk in peace and have a conversation with someone. Other than wearing headphones so it is obvious I cant hear them, are there any tricks that those who live there learn so that they are not constantly pestered? Im hoping to make PV my winter 3 month destination eventually, thats why im trying one month rental 1'st. Do the people selling all this stuff start to recognize you as a local and not a tourist, or do you wear a shirt that says "I live here" or something like that???
You might start by realizing these people have nothing compared to you and cut them a little slack for trying to hustle up a living the only way they know how. That would be a huge start that would no doubt provide you with all kinds of genuine compassion and insight into how to tactfully say no thanks. Here endeth the lesson.
 

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I have watched people to see how they handle the situation, the best way is to totally ignore them, not respond and not make eye contact.
I do not mind them so I am a magnet..
 

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If there are just a few, and they take no for an answer, I politely respond and even occasionally purchase things from them.

Other places, such as some touristy beach areas where they are constant and aggressive and do NOT take no for an answer the first time you say it, I just wag my finger at them and refuse to engage with them at all.

At first had a hard time being rude but in time I found it became such an unpleasant experience just trying to walk down the street that it didn't bother me that much. Yes, I understand that they are just trying to make a living, and I respect that, but they need to respect people are on vacation and just want to enjoy themselves and not have to fight off salespeople every few steps. I refuse to return to some places because the overly aggressive street vendors make it such and unpleasant experience.
 

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In Catemaco, Veracruz the vendors work the malecon and the lake and town are a playground for Mexicans on vacation. Expats are rare. It is also home to many brujos (witches) and a convention of witches is held every year with many ceremonies. Hungarian gypsies often work the malecon and plaza in long lovely gowns, much jewelry and upswept hairdos. The vendors are very polite and it's easy to be polite with them also, but the gypsies can be and are extremely aggressive, especially when they see a ****** face. When introducing a new resident to the town and lake, I would warn about the gypsies. They thought I was kidding when I said, "Shake your head no, ball up your fists and put them behind your back. Don't let them get ahold of your hands or you will owe them 50 pesos for reading your palm." Many times I saw them run across the street or across the plaza when a foreign tourist was spotted.
 

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Im doing a month this january renting in old P.V. Been to Mexico many times but never have enjoyed been pestered by sellers of the same old stuff on the beaches or shopkeepers and timeshare people calling out to you. you feel rude not to answer but its nearly impossible to walk in peace and have a conversation with someone. Other than wearing headphones so it is obvious I cant hear them, are there any tricks that those who live there learn so that they are not constantly pestered? Im hoping to make PV my winter 3 month destination eventually, thats why im trying one month rental 1'st. Do the people selling all this stuff start to recognize you as a local and not a tourist, or do you wear a shirt that says "I live here" or something like that???
Don't make eye contact. Don't acknowledge their existence, their standing in front of you and asking questions. And, in my experience, they go away. After a few times they'll just pass you buy. I understand that the vendors work hard to earn money to survive and I try not to be rude or insulting. I just ignore them. Well, unless they have seomething I want to buy!
 

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If you guys don´t like street or beach vendors here in Mexico , avoid popular vacation spots in Morocco like the plague and I can think of a few other places around the globe that are much worse than here whereever you are destined to vacation. Actually, I find both street and beach vendors in places in Mexico I have traveled to be quite civilized and non-aggressive in comparison to many places I have visited around the world. My darlin´ wife, who posted earlier on this thread and is from France, tells me of gangs of young miscreants who, back in the 50s & 60s, loved to run their boats up to al fresco dining areas on Arcachon Bay or down on the Mediterranean and grab food from the tables of unsuspecting diners racing off with it enjoying their stolen snacks with the furious diners helpless to chase them out into the water. She may have engaged in that sort of behavior herself before having matured but I can´t say. However, she has given me some lessons on how to cope with those with whom you are unaquainted who might annoy you as you dine in an outdoor eating establishment or walk dow a public thoroughfare or beach. Her primary advice is to never sit adjacent to a public area while dining which makes you a highly visible prey. The avoiding eye contact rule works fairly well also except in Morocco where that bit of body English will may only rattle the pest who then may become annoyed and verbally attack you mercilessly while continuing to follow you down the street hanging onto your butt like some loathesome tick until you reach the nearest indoor bar for a drink and enter thereby sloughing him off.

You guys have given me another chance to extoll the virtues of my favorite beaches in Mexico where the chances of running into an annoying beach vendor usually selling total crap are practically nil or even altogether nil. Because Mexico has this incredibly huge and varied shoreline on four seas, there are places you can visit on the Pacific, Sea of Cortez, Caribbean or Gulf of Mexico and never be pestered by anyone except your spouse and many of the places I speak of have extraordinarily beautiful baches and crystal waters but you need to learn where these are on your own. I am not seeking human company at this stage of my life, only dogs.

Of course, as I have stated before, my favorite beaches are those seemingly endless and deserted beaches adjacent to Lake Chapala for several reasons:
* Outside of town, there´s usually nobody there except perhaps, occasionally, someone passing by walking to work or fishermen going about their business with no interest in you as you walk by. If you ever spotted a vendor on these beaches,it would be his bleached bones and any aging Coca- Colas in a container he had hoped to sell without accomplishing even one sale of one bottle.
* The beach is hard packed mud and sand to facilitate strolling with your mutts unlike the sea beaches which are often deep, soft, annoying fine sand difficult to walk in. Also there is no chance of any sleeper waves washing your mutts out to sea as on the Pacific although that may be a mixed blessing.
* If you have the good fortune to live near the lake, you don´t have to pack five rambunctious canines into your car and drive to the beach. Just walk out your front door or down a block or two and there you area.

I no longer know what is more annoying; street and beach vendors or Las Vegas. It´s a toss-up.
 

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Yes, it's a popular misconception that vendors confine their efforts to just the most popular tourist destinations. And, yes, it's the Mexicans the vendors primarily target for their sales efforts ... but anyone within arm reach or who can hear them are subject to their sales pitch. We're talking about Mexico, so whatever the situation may be elsewhere on the planet ... is, IMO, irrelevant.
 

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Yes, it's a popular misconception that vendors confine their efforts to just the most popular tourist destinations. And, yes, it's the Mexicans the vendors primarily target for their sales efforts ... but anyone within arm reach or who can hear them are subject to their sales pitch. We're talking about Mexico, so whatever the situation may be elsewhere on the planet ... is, IMO, irrelevant.


I disagree with that last part of your comment proposing that whatever the situation may be elsewhere on the planet is irrelevant to a discussion of (beach or street "vendors") in Mexico and here is why I take exception to that posture. I have had the privilege of having visited streets and backroads in urban and rural areas and beaches in many parts of the planet in economically deprived and economically advantaged areas and, while it may be that what you call "vendors" but I would more readily define as "street hustlers" annoy all within reach, local or foreign, they, whether on the beaches of Mombasa, Puerto Vallarta or Alexandria, only have so much time to hustle up a daily meal so they look for the most likely source of money in whatever local currency and, on a beach, at least, that is often the gullible tourist from wherever easily charmed or intimidated and not the well-to-do local families inhabiting the same area but cognizant of the local situation and, thus, unmoved by the hustle. You do not find the hustlers where there is no or little human activity engaged in by people, whether locals or people just passing through, presumed to have some money to spare and willing to part with it whether you are in Uganda or Mexico and I know this positively from personal experience. The point of my earlier post on this thread was that, in my experience, Mexican street or beach "vendors" are quite polite in comparisan to similar "vendors" in many parts of the world and are relatively quick to politely back off if rejection of their sales pitch is obvious. I was paying my compliments to Mexico and pointing out that street and beach vendors hereabouts are pretty damn civil compared to many places I have been privileged to travel over the years. In other words, those of you complaining about the annoyance of Mexican street and beach hustlers calm down. Go spend a week in Tangiers and you will realize how civilized Mexico is (for the most part) upon your return here.
 

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We are square on topic, Longford. Never drifted a millimeter off topic. This is about street vendors in Mexico who, if they are going to be judged one way or the other by expatriates, must be judged in context and that context includes the comparison with the annoyances of street hustlers and their mannerisms wherever one may be on the planet.

Here at Lake Chapala at the Ajijic delegacion with a significant expat community, there are those expats posting on local forums who are mightily disturbed by the fact that, when they approach the grounds of the largely expat managed Lake Chapala Society, a legacy, since somewhat evolved, of an expat author/poet who lived here in the 1950s, which is accessed by several small entrance doors though a high wall, they must, in order to enter the grounds, run the gamut of a few young men selling fresh fruit and soliciting their business and these posters find this minor encumbrance unacceptable so they carry on on some forums as if they had been delayed by Nazis demanding papers or thieves damanding tolls to pass. When I saw this thread developing about "street vendors" in Mexico, I thought it important to give my opinion about this phenomenon in Mexico where, in my opinion, street vendor activity is relatively civilized in comparison to many places I have traveled and unworthy of invective, and that opinion is, don´t get your shorts in a knot - just walk around them, for God´s sake and save your money for the next time you are hiking through the Lacandon Forest and have to pay some indigenous vigilantes in the middle of the woods just to pass and not end up in the ground.

My wife just called me from San Cristóbal de Las Casas and was telling me about roadblocks and civil disorder in Chiapas which sometimes seems a world unto itself and that certainly puts the kids selling berries at the entrance of the Lake Chapala Society in a proper light. Always carry a cell phone, I say.
 

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I know, I know ... you've been everwhere, done everything, etc., etc. We've all listened to the bragging. But leave the Nazi reference out of the discussion. Unless, of course ... you have some personal experience with the organization. ;-)
 

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I know, I know ... you've been everwhere, done everything, etc., etc. We've all listened to the bragging. But leave the Nazi reference out of the discussion. Unless, of course ... you have some personal experience with the organization. ;-)
My comment regarding "Nazis" was that some expats treat street vendors who solicit their business as they pass as if they were "Nazis" demanding papers or thieves demanding tolls to pass. My point was that these folks were greatly exaggerating the inconvenience they experienced in having been solicited by a street or beach vendor for a some cheap fruit or merchandise and in my post I complimented Mexican street vendors for their civility and wilingness to quickly back off if rejected for a sale.

I guess you think that I am bragging when, as an adjunct to my comment, I supported my position that street vendors in Mexico were unusually polite in their encounters with pedestrians or beachgoers in comparison to many countries I have visited in the world which I visited as a young and very poor backpacker back in the 1960s, not a cruise line passenger. How, except by explaining this, am I to support my premise that Mexican street vendors are comparitively civilized and should be given some slack?


As for having had some personal experience with "the organization", what organization would that be? I actually had quite a bit of experience with violent and dangerous racist organizations in Alabama in the 1950s and 1960s from the ku Klux Klan to even more dangerous authority figures such as "Bull" Connor, the Public Safety Director of Birmingham for many years and Jim Clark, the sheriff of Dallas County (Selma) to the more insidious White Citizen´s Council which, in those days was known as the country club kluxers. Those violent goons such as Connor and Clark never asked for papers in those days, they just beat the crap out of you if you were black or (even more so) a white sympathizer marching with blacks simply demanding the right to vote or sit at a Woolworth´s or Greyhound lunch counter. I know because I was there at the time and took part in many of those events whether or not you believe it.

As for street vendors in Mexico, try your luck at San Cristóbal de Las Casas where the streets are filled with vendors selling everything from chewing gum to all sorts or mostly crappy paraphernalia, much of it made in China but claimed to be made in places like touristy San Juan Chamula just outside of San Cristóbal and a magnet for Chiapas first-time tourists. They crowd the streets and many are young children or the elderly or infirm or women with infants who may work the street 15 hours or more every single day and those young children risk a serious beating from their parents or guardians if they fail to meet daily sales goals. They are always going to be there but, while they may solicit your business, they are never pushy or rude and are gone in a flash if rejected. If you want to help, buy some chewing gum.

All the above reminds me of an old Dick Gregory joke from the 60s. He said that the real heroics of the young black men and women staging lunch counter sit-ins at Greyhound Bus Stations around the South in those days was not demonstrated by their willingness to sit there and be assaulted by thuggish kluxers or cops and, perhaps, thrown in jail but their willingness to actually eat at a lunch counter at a Greyhound Bus Station.
 

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I've lived in PV for just over a year now, and I have no issues with the merchants/vendors.

After the 3rd or 4th week, some of them ask how long my vacation was, which I then explained that I live here now.

They now know I'm a local, and don't bother me (I even get the locals discount)
 

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I live in San Cristobal de las Casas which has many street vendors. I actually know many of them and treat them as human and not as if they were a animal. This works great for me. The only come up to me to speak. For the rare time a vendor tries to sell me something I just shake my finger back and forth and say no gracies. I can say that all of my ****** friends can't stand them to be near them. They are all good people who are just trying to make a few peso's. Give them a break they are part of the culture. While there may be one or two who get beat by there parents I think it is rare that that happens.
 
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