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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. Understand
A few things to understand:
- Melbourne has >4.6 million people who live in some 320 suburbs. It is practically impossible to list 3 or 4 "good ones". I know people who have lived in Melbourne all their lives and even they are not familiar with all of them.
- Whether a suburb is good is mostly subjective. My priorities are different than yours. If you're single, young couple, with a litter of children... you will have different priorities. Many people here listed Indian grocery as a priority; I for one don't care about that. A friend of mine who has recently moved to Melbourne doesn't drive, is single and we would never switch places because our priorities are completely different.
We are all different and our definition of "good" is not the same.
- Understand that there are suburbs that are optimal: close to the city, safe, good schools, good facilities AND cheap. You cannot have it all.
- The closer you are to the CBD, the more expensive real estate is. The suburbs that are closer to the city have smaller places to live, either in the form of apartments or old houses. Suburbs that are farther away tend to have a greater number of new units. Suburbs that surround the city usually have more restaurants, bars, coffee shops and various other businesses; there is more stuff within walking distance.

2. Accept
- Accept the reality of the situation: you cannot have it all (more on this in the following point...)
- Accept that nobody here can tell you exactly where you should move.
- Accept that it's unreasonable to expect someone here to tell you where the good schools are.
- Accept that you will have to spend many hours online looking at places that you might like, looking at the area surrounding each potential place, etc. There are no quick answers.
- Accept that you are taking a chance, while knowing that the risk is not that bad. If you don't like where you live, you can move. It's easy to move in Melbourne; there are all sorts of facilities that make it easy.

So instead of worrying too much about finding that perfect place, accept that you will live in a place that you will in all probability like and if you don't you can move, and that you have plenty of other things to worry about that now.

3. Set priorities
What's important to you? Make a list. E.g. I wanted plenty of parks for my then 4 year-old son; my wife insisted that we get a place that is relatively new and dismissed anything that looked old. Be aware of what you are willing to sacrifice and what you prefer to get instead. Be aware of what you're willing to pay for rent.

4. Do your homework
Yes, it will take many hours but you will have to do it. You will spend time looking at places online, going around to see places, etc. One advice I can give is to try to be methodical: make a spreadsheet, list advantages and disadvantages and how that aligns with your priorities. You will quickly get pretty good at evaluating places and knowing what to dismiss from the start.

Go out and see places - not just viewing the property, but if you are seriously considering an area then go there and walk around, see what it's like. Get a feel for it.

All this takes time and it's time that you need to put into it. Don't expect to ask a question here and get THE answer and it’s not because we all know but simply won’t tell you.

5. Be willing to take a risk
It's ok. I have met people who didn't like their initial place. Moving is relatively easy; all the utilities get transferred quickly. You will be fine.:)



I know nothing about shared living arrangements.
 

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well said dude, well said.
But, with all that in mind, it is still close to impossible to land the perfect place from day 1.
I, for example, planning to move in Dec-Jan 2017,I don`t have a clue where I would like to stay. I visited Melbourne for 2 weeks this year, I have some vague ideas of what I would like to find, but don`t know yet where should I go find that :D

Still working though..
 

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1. Understand
A few things to understand:
- Melbourne has >4.6 million people who live in some 320 suburbs. It is practically impossible to list 3 or 4 "good ones". I know people who have lived in Melbourne all their lives and even they are not familiar with all of them.
- Whether a suburb is good is mostly subjective. My priorities are different than yours. If you're single, young couple, with a litter of children... you will have different priorities. Many people here listed Indian grocery as a priority; I for one don't care about that. A friend of mine who has recently moved to Melbourne doesn't drive, is single and we would never switch places because our priorities are completely different.
We are all different and our definition of "good" is not the same.
- Understand that there are suburbs that are optimal: close to the city, safe, good schools, good facilities AND cheap. You cannot have it all.
- The closer you are to the CBD, the more expensive real estate is. The suburbs that are closer to the city have smaller places to live, either in the form of apartments or old houses. Suburbs that are farther away tend to have a greater number of new units. Suburbs that surround the city usually have more restaurants, bars, coffee shops and various other businesses; there is more stuff within walking distance.

2. Accept
- Accept the reality of the situation: you cannot have it all (more on this in the following point...)
- Accept that nobody here can tell you exactly where you should move.
- Accept that it's unreasonable to expect someone here to tell you where the good schools are.
- Accept that you will have to spend many hours online looking at places that you might like, looking at the area surrounding each potential place, etc. There are no quick answers.
- Accept that you are taking a chance, while knowing that the risk is not that bad. If you don't like where you live, you can move. It's easy to move in Melbourne; there are all sorts of facilities that make it easy.

So instead of worrying too much about finding that perfect place, accept that you will live in a place that you will in all probability like and if you don't you can move, and that you have plenty of other things to worry about that now.

3. Set priorities
What's important to you? Make a list. E.g. I wanted plenty of parks for my then 4 year-old son; my wife insisted that we get a place that is relatively new and dismissed anything that looked old. Be aware of what you are willing to sacrifice and what you prefer to get instead. Be aware of what you're willing to pay for rent.

4. Do your homework
Yes, it will take many hours but you will have to do it. You will spend time looking at places online, going around to see places, etc. One advice I can give is to try to be methodical: make a spreadsheet, list advantages and disadvantages and how that aligns with your priorities. You will quickly get pretty good at evaluating places and knowing what to dismiss from the start.

Go out and see places - not just viewing the property, but if you are seriously considering an area then go there and walk around, see what it's like. Get a feel for it.

All this takes time and it's time that you need to put into it. Don't expect to ask a question here and get THE answer and it’s not because we all know but simply won’t tell you.

5. Be willing to take a risk
It's ok. I have met people who didn't like their initial place. Moving is relatively easy; all the utilities get transferred quickly. You will be fine.:)



I know nothing about shared living arrangements.
Well said! agree with everything you mentioned. I am planning to move with my family in September and have been doing a lot of study :)

Each suburb has its own Pros and Cons, planning to stay in Airbnb for a few weeks, explore the areas I have in mind and then take a call.
 

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I'm moving to Sydney, and all the above points also apply there. The problem I am having is schools. Once my oldest is enrolled in a school, we're stuck in that neighbourhood. Moving to Australia is dislocation enough without moving schools once we get there. It makes it even more tricky as I have the feeling I need to make the right choice first time. The only way I can address this is to accept that she won't go to school for the first weeks we are there, giving us time to explore before we enrol her. That's also not optimal, but I guess I'm going to need to relax a little if this is going to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The problem I am having is schools. Once my oldest is enrolled in a school, we're stuck in that neighbourhood.
[...]
That's also not optimal, but I guess I'm going to need to relax a little if this is going to work.
That last sentence hit the nail on the head, I think. Relax. Chances are, you'll be fine. What's the worst that can happen? You may end up with a school that may not have otherwise been your first choice. That's not exactly a life-threatening situation. In the grand scheme of things, the move to Australia has far greater implications and changes someone's life on such a level that a slightly different school is unlikely to make a huge impact. There is too much to appreciate in Australia to get hung up on that.
 
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