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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi -

I am a US citizen and am currently visiting my partner in the UK for the next 6 months. We plan to go to the US in August to marry after which I will apply for a spouse visa so we can live together permanently in the UK.

The spouse visa application process is straightforward, but I have a question about timing and logistics.

We are planning to marry in Tahoe and then take our honeymoon in Canada. However, I understand that I need to submit my US passport in order to complete the required documentation for the spouse application. My question is, I am also an Australian citizen. If we submit our application immediately after we marry in Tahoe (my US passport included), is there any issue with me travelling to Canada for our honeymoon on my Australian passport and then returning to the US in time for my biometric appointment?

Also, is it correct that my husband will need to return to the UK before we submit the spouse application or can we submit it whilst he is still in the states with me?

Thanks for all of your help. This forum is invaluable!
 

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My question is, I am also an Australian citizen. If we submit our application immediately after we marry in Tahoe (my US passport included), is there any issue with me travelling to Canada for our honeymoon on my Australian passport and then returning to the US in time for my biometric appointment?
As I understand it, you now need a passport to return to the US from Canada. (Wasn't always that way.) Entering the US on anything but your US passport can quickly become a very BIG problem.

Both the State Department and Customs and Border Patrol websites include statements that all US Citizens should leave and enter the US on their US passports. But they don't actually state what will (or "might") happen if you try to use your "other" passport to enter the country.

I'd play it safe and apply for your visa just before or just after your honeymoon. If you pay the extra fee, you'll have your visa in just a couple of days.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As I understand it, you now need a passport to return to the US from Canada. (Wasn't always that way.) Entering the US on anything but your US passport can quickly become a very BIG problem.

Both the State Department and Customs and Border Patrol websites include statements that all US Citizens should leave and enter the US on their US passports. But they don't actually state what will (or "might") happen if you try to use your "other" passport to enter the country.

I'd play it safe and apply for your visa just before or just after your honeymoon. If you pay the extra fee, you'll have your visa in just a couple of days.
Cheers,
Bev
Makes sense. I thought that might be the case.

In regards to applying for the visa just before my honeymoon, does that mean my partner can still be with me in the states when I apply (I thought I read somewhere that he actually needs to be in the UK)? How do I pay for the expedited service - is it an option when we pay for and submit our application?

Thanks!
 

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Makes sense. I thought that might be the case.

In regards to applying for the visa just before my honeymoon, does that mean my partner can still be with me in the states when I apply (I thought I read somewhere that he actually needs to be in the UK)? How do I pay for the expedited service - is it an option when we pay for and submit our application?
Yes, he can stay with your in US while your application is processed.
Current turnaround time is only 3 days without priority, so it's probably just as quick not to do priority and save $300. In the last year or so, the longest for most applications has been 4 days, and the shortest 3 days, so pretty constant. Of course, depending on individual circumstances, your case may attract longer time so 3 days isn't guaranteed, and you won't get any quicker by paying for priority if they have to refer your case to London for a decision, for example. This only happens if you have issues, such as bad immigration history with UK such as previously failed visa application or refused entry. Also if your finance or accommodation is a borderline case.
 
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