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We plan to move to Spain after staying in hot area in China for years.

We bought a holiday flat in Alicante--Villamartin plaza. We spent two weeks in Alicante. But it seems so hot and dry. I am not sure whether I will like it.

My son is only 4 years old. We hope he can learn Spanish faster and hope to live some where not so hot and dye. Costa Blanca seems full of retired rich people, just golf and drinking all the time. Not really Spain, right?

My husband can speak good Spanish and i will learn it.

Can anybody give us some suggestion?

Of couse, my British husband does not like cold at all. That is one reason he live abroad for years.

Thanks

Sandra
 

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We plan to move to Spain after staying in hot area in China for years.

We bought a holiday flat in Alicante--Villamartin plaza. We spent two weeks in Alicante. But it seems so hot and dry. I am not sure whether I will like it.

My son is only 4 years old. We hope he can learn Spanish faster and hope to live some where not so hot and dye. Costa Blanca seems full of retired rich people, just golf and drinking all the time. Not really Spain, right?

My husband can speak good Spanish and i will learn it.

Can anybody give us some suggestion?

Of couse, my British husband does not like cold at all. That is one reason he live abroad for years.

Thanks

Sandra
I live on the Costa Blanca

I'm not rich, nor retired, don't play golf (don't have time - too busy working) ... can't honestly say that I don't like a drink now & then though

I not only speak Spanish, but I teach it

as for the weather - yesterday I wore a vest top, crop trousers & flip flops.......... today I have on jeans, a t-shirt, sweatshirt & Uggs - it became winter overnight!!

also, we have humidity around 80% most days, sometimes it drops to 60+% - most nights it hovers around 95-100% all year round - so it's far from dry
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I live on the Costa Blanca

I'm not rich, nor retired, don't play golf (don't have time - too busy working) ... can't honestly say that I don't like a drink now & then though

I not only speak Spanish, but I teach it

as for the weather - yesterday I wore a vest top, crop trousers & flip flops.......... today I have on jeans, a t-shirt, sweatshirt & Uggs - it became winter overnight!!

also, we have humidity around 80% most days, sometimes it drops to 60+% - most nights it hovers around 95-100% all year round - so it's far from dry
Thank you xabiachica for such quick reply. Maybe I did not stay long enough to feel the wheather in Spain!
Maybe one day you can teach me Spanish. hehe.
 

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We plan to move to Spain after staying in hot area in China for years.

We bought a holiday flat in Alicante--Villamartin plaza. We spent two weeks in Alicante. But it seems so hot and dry. I am not sure whether I will like it.

My son is only 4 years old. We hope he can learn Spanish faster and hope to live some where not so hot and dye. Costa Blanca seems full of retired rich people, just golf and drinking all the time. Not really Spain, right?

My husband can speak good Spanish and i will learn it.

Can anybody give us some suggestion?

Of couse, my British husband does not like cold at all. That is one reason he live abroad for years.

Thanks

Sandra
Hi Sandra,

We don't find the weather dry particularly, humid when its hot more like and as said quite changeable at times like at the beginning of the summer and when it ends (eventually!)

I'm guessing your impression of the area may be affected by your buying a 'holiday flat' meaning that your surroundings could be influenced by folks retired or on their holidays... :)

I'm sure if you give it a bit longer and travel around a bit, especially inland you'll see it as a bit more 'real' :)
 

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There is a wide range of climates in Spain. Almería is home to the largest desert in Europe. Go to the west around Cádiz area and you will get a bit more rain. For plenty of rain go to the north west to Galicia. For snows you need either to be near the Sierra Nevada or the Pyrenees/Picos de Europa.

Temperatures vary as much by altitude as by latitude. Where I live it is at about 700 metres and it may, for example, be 35°, 50km south near Granada and in the Genil valley it will possibly be 38°, but go north from here towards Andújar and you will be in the Guadalquivir Depression and the temperature could be 42°, or northwest from here to Córdoba and you are likely to find 45°. The Genil Valley is about 5-600 m high, Andújar 250m, Córdoba 106m. Of course, these are all inland and less affected by the moderating effect of the sea.

Go to the centre of the peninsula to Madrid and you will have hot summers and quite cold winters, nearer the coasts there are fewer extremes of temperature.
 

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If you want the perfect climate, then you should perhaps consider the Canary Islands, yes we are part of Spain.:D
 

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Coastal Areas And Beaches

My better half says that it is not nice to live by the beach, as the climate is too humid/wet, so we spend most of our time living in Murcia city, which is supposedly drier than Costa Blanca.

Winters are always rainier and more humid than summers, but I recommend you to find something at or close to the beach. :):yo:




We plan to move to Spain after staying in hot area in China for years.

We bought a holiday flat in Alicante--Villamartin plaza. We spent two weeks in Alicante. But it seems so hot and dry. I am not sure whether I will like it.

My son is only 4 years old. We hope he can learn Spanish faster and hope to live some where not so hot and dye. Costa Blanca seems full of retired rich people, just golf and drinking all the time. Not really Spain, right?

My husband can speak good Spanish and i will learn it.

Can anybody give us some suggestion?

Of couse, my British husband does not like cold at all. That is one reason he live abroad for years.

Thanks

Sandra
 

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We plan to move to Spain after staying in hot area in China for years.

We bought a holiday flat in Alicante--Villamartin plaza. We spent two weeks in Alicante. But it seems so hot and dry. I am not sure whether I will like it.

My son is only 4 years old. We hope he can learn Spanish faster and hope to live some where not so hot and dye. Costa Blanca seems full of retired rich people, just golf and drinking all the time. Not really Spain, right?

My husband can speak good Spanish and i will learn it.

Can anybody give us some suggestion?

Of couse, my British husband does not like cold at all. That is one reason he live abroad for years.

Thanks

Sandra
I live in a region of Malaga called La Axarquia. We are in a mountainous area and we can get windy nights. However, we get less rain than everywhere around us. I walk every morning without fail. I have only had one wet morning since May, yet a few miles down the road they have had a lot of rain on some days. It did cool down rapidly last night as someone has said, but I was out walking this mornibg in shorts, I just need a light fleece on. The weather in Spain can be very regional and local. Some mountainous areas create their own eco climates.
I love living in Andalucia, fantastic scenery and I live 20 minutes from the beach. I do know Villamartin and the plaza as we have friends there, but it does not compare to where I live, but home is where the heart is for all of us.

I don't like the expression retired rich people. Most of the people I know who are retired in Spain have come from backgrounds you don't associate with being rich. Most are comfortable and have become that way through hard work during their lives.

Spain is a wonderful place to move to.
 

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For me, beach holds no attractions. I was born less than half a mile from the sea wall. I have lived close to the beach (less than a mile) for much of my life - it has nothing to offer. Spanish beaches with their blobs of blubber gently barbecuing under a blazing sun while the sun oil sizzles are repulsive sights. A nice quiet cove untouched by humans with blue water and white sand is nice in a photograph but that's it.
 

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Very rarely humid where we live. The most humid place I have ever been to is Florida. When we used to get a reported 100% humidity in Britain I can honestly say it simply doesn't compare to
100% in Florida. There is no comparison. In Florida, you walk outside and immediately you feel like you have been sitting in a very hot bath. It simply doesn't compare. I have been here in Spain when I've been told it is very humid today. Nope, it isn't. Spain is not the sub-tropics and never will be.
 

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Very rarely humid where we live. The most humid place I have ever been to is Florida. When we used to get a reported 100% humidity in Britain I can honestly say it simply doesn't compare to
100% in Florida. There is no comparison. In Florida, you walk outside and immediately you feel like you have been sitting in a very hot bath. It simply doesn't compare. I have been here in Spain when I've been told it is very humid today. Nope, it isn't. Spain is not the sub-tropics and never will be.
My experience of Florida is opening the car door and it feeling as though somebody has thrown in a soggy warm sponge. The next worse places - Puerto Rico and Caracas, you step out of the aircraft and a wet warm slug of air goes up your trouser legs
 

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Very rarely humid where we live. The most humid place I have ever been to is Florida. When we used to get a reported 100% humidity in Britain I can honestly say it simply doesn't compare to
100% in Florida. There is no comparison. In Florida, you walk outside and immediately you feel like you have been sitting in a very hot bath. It simply doesn't compare. I have been here in Spain when I've been told it is very humid today. Nope, it isn't. Spain is not the sub-tropics and never will be.
oddly enough, one of the reasons we moved here from Florida, was that I hated the humidity

every summer since we moved here though it has got worse - & yes, although it's not for as many months of the year, it's every bit as bad here as there. We regularly get 95%-100% humidity - & the high temperatures to go with it

I use a tumble dryer here more than I ever did in the UK - even in the summer, if you don't take the washing in as soon as it's dry - once the sun moves off it, it just gets wet again!
 

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Very rarely humid where we live. The most humid place I have ever been to is Florida. When we used to get a reported 100% humidity in Britain I can honestly say it simply doesn't compare to
100% in Florida. There is no comparison. In Florida, you walk outside and immediately you feel like you have been sitting in a very hot bath. It simply doesn't compare. I have been here in Spain when I've been told it is very humid today. Nope, it isn't. Spain is not the sub-tropics and never will be.
Humidity must be a relative thing then.
I've lived in the Madrid area for over 20 years so I'm used to a very dry climate. I can take temperatures of maybe 38º plus with little problem here, but 30º in Valencia, Tarragona or even high twenties in the UK and I go all floppy.
Anyway, getting back to topic the OP talks about Valencia being hot and dry, but I bet it depends whether you're on the coast or not and how high up you are. Height really affects temp and should always be looked at when renting/ buying as should the orientation to the sun...
 

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Alicante looks dry, though -- blue sky, rocks and prickly things.
 

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In summer, the lower the humidity the higher the temperature. However, the higher the humidity the lower the temperature but it feels much warmer and canbe uncomfortable.
 

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We've never had to use our tumble drier outside of the winter months when it is cloudy. Simply no humidity on that kind of level. I think it has something to do with a large mountain range behind us...
 

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We've never had to use our tumble drier outside of the winter months when it is cloudy. Simply no humidity on that kind of level. I think it has something to do with a large mountain range behind us...
our very high humidity is more than likely caused by the fact that we're right on the coast & completely surrounded by...................... mountains !!!

the damp sea air just gets trapped!
 

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our very high humidity is more than likely caused by the fact that we're right on the coast & completely surrounded by...................... mountains !!!

the damp sea air just gets trapped!
We sometimes get high humidity because we are IN the mountains and when the cloud comes down, it is WET
 
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