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I find myself more & more often forgetting the English word for something & using the Spanish one in the middle of a sentence - it happens vice versa, too

for some things I just can't think of the English word - in my lesson this morning I held up a picture of an avocado & another of a plate - I wanted the student to say 'the avocado is on the plate' - I usually say it in English & they have to say it in Spanish..............could I think of the word 'avocado'? - could I heck :eek:

oddly - I often forget that one - don't know why - I've been putting it down to aged brain cells - another one is butterfly, & yet another marshmallow (I just had to ask my dd what that is in English :eek:)

it might not be though - I just heard my 16 year old say to her sister 'pasame the piping bag :D

she didn't even realise she'd spanglished!
 

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Yep, happens to me too. I was talking to my Welsh mother-in-law at the weekend and couldn't remember the English word for apricot.

Avocado is strange, isn't it - it looks more Spanish than aguacate. Apparently it comes from an Aztec word for testicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep, happens to me too. I was talking to my Welsh mother-in-law at the weekend and couldn't remember the English word for apricot.

Avocado is strange, isn't it - it looks more Spanish than aguacate. Apparently it comes from an Aztec word for testicles.
those Aztecs were wishful thinkers weren't they :eek:
 

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I forget words all the time, it drives me crazy. My kids do a lot of spanglish, poor things. Because they only get their spanish from me they do a lot of gramatical mistakes, sometime feels like I'm correcting them all the time.
The worst one is when they say the word" without" in spanish. They both do the same mistake all the time...ie: I want the burger without cheese - Quiero la hamburguesa con-sin queso
:frusty:
 

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Whenever I go to the UK, my first few days are a total mix of Spanglish (or in this case Englishspan - is there such a word?). And all the time I am there, I always find myself saying things like qué pasa?, de nada, pues (I love pues as it gives me time to think!), and gracias of course...

But here in Spain, one of my main problems is with the gender of some words, so I often find myself mumbling (or talking fast over) the el or the la. It fools no one, but allows me to keep on talking, because if I stop to query a word in my head, I get lost!
 

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I forget words all the time, it drives me crazy. My kids do a lot of spanglish, poor things. Because they only get their spanish from me they do a lot of gramatical mistakes, sometime feels like I'm correcting them all the time.
The worst one is when they say the word" without" in spanish. They both do the same mistake all the time...ie: I want the burger without cheese - Quiero la hamburguesa con-sin queso
:frusty:
Oh , that's good , I like that one !:D
 

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I forget words all the time, it drives me crazy. My kids do a lot of spanglish, poor things. Because they only get their spanish from me they do a lot of gramatical mistakes, sometime feels like I'm correcting them all the time.
The worst one is when they say the word" without" in spanish. They both do the same mistake all the time...ie: I want the burger without cheese - Quiero la hamburguesa con-sin queso
:frusty:
Should be con-fuera huh?;)

I have said muchas gracias in British pubs on several occasions and as it comes out as Andaluz mucha grathia I leave some very confused barmaids behind.:confused:
 

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Oh , that's good , I like that one !:D
If you liked that one, then you will also like how they say" balls"... (pelotas) = Boletas. :confused:
And then there is "coger un bano" , told them a million times that we don't "cogemos" baths but "nos damos" baths. They still dont' get it.
 

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'ganas.' I'm forever saying things like 'oh, I don't have the ganas to go there.'

Last week I was talking to a friend about how I want at least a 2:1 for my degree and said, in English 'but I have to have good notes [buenas notas] or I can't do a masters!'
 

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A lot of our family here in Galicia went to work in the UK during the civil war here so we are completely immersed in Spanish or even Gallgish (Gallego/English). The one thing that drops in a lot of times during a conversation in either Castellano or Gallego are a lot of English swear words. Find they're more direct and less blasphemous! Lets face it, swearing in Spain is perfectly normal and said amongst even school teachers (****, ******, joder) - it's only when it becomes "me **** en la ostia" or "me **** en di.." that it is more offensive. Yet the F word is perfectly normal.

Interesting that in my kids' English class they are watching films such as Gran Torino and The SHining etc and the kids are really enjoying running around shouting out the F word in English - until the rare teacher that comes along who understands those words is able to pick up on it. Well they do say that in any language it is the palabrotas that are the first words that anyone understands!
 
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