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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering if there are any other teachers that qualified in the Common Wealth and have not managed to get QTS in the UK?

Came to the UK 3 years ago and have found it a catch 22 situation to do the OTTP, time has now run out for me and so after September, I will not be able to teach in a state maintained school here in the UK. This has been a BIG blow!!
My family and I have settled well into the UK but now feel a need to look at our options of moving to Oz/NZ but:
not sure I can go through another big move again...it was hell to find our feet,
there seem to be so many cons to living in Oz/NZ compared to the UK,
realistically not sure we could afford it at our age since we lost a lot of money when we moved here with the Rand/£ being >15/1.

Anyone in a similar position? How does teaching in Oz/NZ compares to the UK?
 

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I'm wondering if there are any other teachers that qualified in the Common Wealth and have not managed to get QTS in the UK?

Came to the UK 3 years ago and have found it a catch 22 situation to do the OTTP, time has now run out for me and so after September, I will not be able to teach in a state maintained school here in the UK. This has been a BIG blow!!
My family and I have settled well into the UK but now feel a need to look at our options of moving to Oz/NZ but:
not sure I can go through another big move again...it was hell to find our feet,
there seem to be so many cons to living in Oz/NZ compared to the UK,
realistically not sure we could afford it at our age since we lost a lot of money when we moved here with the Rand/£ being >15/1.

Anyone in a similar position? How does teaching in Oz/NZ compares to the UK?
I am well aware of the situation with regard to obtaining QTS for non-EEA trained teachers. You have to get QTS through overseas trained teachers programme within 4 years, or you can no longer teach in state schools (though you can still do so in private schools) and if you need one, your visa won't be renewed.
Teaching is a shortage occupation in both NZ and Australia, so you may be able to become the main visa applicant. You need to check about the acceptability of your SA teaching qualification. A lot of UK-trained teachers have moved down under with visa sponsorship. Just beware that the current strength of both NZ$ and Aussie $ (up 15% against the pound since last autumn alone) makes everything quite expensive, and you will need a substantial start-up capital to make a successful move.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am well aware of the situation with regard to obtaining QTS for non-EEA trained teachers. You have to get QTS through overseas trained teachers programme within 4 years, or you can no longer teach in state schools (though you can still do so in private schools) and if you need one, your visa won't be renewed.
Teaching is a shortage occupation in both NZ and Australia, so you may be able to become the main visa applicant. You need to check about the acceptability of your SA teaching qualification. A lot of UK-trained teachers have moved down under with visa sponsorship. Just beware that the current strength of both NZ$ and Aussie $ (up 15% against the pound since last autumn alone) makes everything quite expensive, and you will need a substantial start-up capital to make a successful move.
Thanks Joppa. If we considered the move I would probably keep my house here in the UK and not buy for 2 years until we were sure that we wanted to settle there, and in the hope that the UK housing market would have recovered by then and the pound strengthened... Where is that crystal ball?
 

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I just registered to fill you in on some details with moving to OZ.

I am from the UK, I taught in North London for two years before deciding to move to Sydney with my wife. We are a young couple (Late 20's) and had nothing to lose.

I have not started to look for teaching work yet, as I am here on a working holiday visa and wanted to have a small holiday first.

We stayed with friends for the first week and looked for flats to rent.

Renting flats in Sydney works like this:

You find a flat/house you like the look of online or in the windows of the estate agents. You ring them and ask to view the property. You turn up on the day and find (In our experience) at least 14 other couples looking to rent the same flat. They have viewings twice a week. It is very competitive, I have even been in a situation where the agent asked all parties who were interested to stay behind and then had them compete for the property like an auction, with the rent going through the roof. If you like the flat/house you ask for a form and go away to fill it in. There is a point system, you need 100 points to qualify even before your details are shown to a landlord.

You get points for things like:
Two work ref (40 points)
Previous landlord ref(40 points)
Bank statement etc....

Being from the uk and with out a job lined up, we had to scrape the barrel to get enough points.

My advice, find estate agents online now and ask them what you need to get the 100points for their agency, they do differ from place to place.

The average price of one bed room flats in north Sydney (again from our experience) is about $400.

Now here is the kicker, for that price you get nothing near the quality of flat you get in the UK. They are small, no out door space, which you need here as it has been 30 degrees at 9 in the moring! You get a tiny kitchen with an old old oven/stove and sink. Almost all Australians take their fridge with them, so you will most likely have to buy or rent a fridge.

Parking here is very expensive, even on residential streets there 4 hr parking restrictions, unless you have a permit, which you wont get until you have a place sorted.

Shopping, and I mean food shopping, is expensive here, I know it is a big city, but it is much higher than London. In the London we budget £60 a week, and that was the basics, here we are spending on average $200. That is just for two!

You will def need a car. Public transport is good, but you just need a car, its like the states.

Almost all of the schools I have seen are Catholic, so they have the usual criteria.

I dont mean to sound negative, the life style here is second to none, with people of all ages out on walks and bike rides, days at the beach, it really is great, but it has costed a lot more than we had expected.

I hope I have not put you off, but given you some info to help you decide.

If you moved to the UK, I am sure you will have researched it, just make sure you apply the same thinking to moving to OZ.
 

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I just registered to fill you in on some details with moving to OZ.

I am from the UK, I taught in North London for two years before deciding to move to Sydney with my wife. We are a young couple (Late 20's) and had nothing to lose.

I have not started to look for teaching work yet, as I am here on a working holiday visa and wanted to have a small holiday first.

We stayed with friends for the first week and looked for flats to rent.

Renting flats in Sydney works like this:

You find a flat/house you like the look of online or in the windows of the estate agents. You ring them and ask to view the property. You turn up on the day and find (In our experience) at least 14 other couples looking to rent the same flat. They have viewings twice a week. It is very competitive, I have even been in a situation where the agent asked all parties who were interested to stay behind and then had them compete for the property like an auction, with the rent going through the roof. If you like the flat/house you ask for a form and go away to fill it in. There is a point system, you need 100 points to qualify even before your details are shown to a landlord.

You get points for things like:
Two work ref (40 points)
Previous landlord ref(40 points)
Bank statement etc....

Being from the uk and with out a job lined up, we had to scrape the barrel to get enough points.

My advice, find estate agents online now and ask them what you need to get the 100points for their agency, they do differ from place to place.

The average price of one bed room flats in north Sydney (again from our experience) is about $400.

Now here is the kicker, for that price you get nothing near the quality of flat you get in the UK. They are small, no out door space, which you need here as it has been 30 degrees at 9 in the moring! You get a tiny kitchen with an old old oven/stove and sink. Almost all Australians take their fridge with them, so you will most likely have to buy or rent a fridge.

Parking here is very expensive, even on residential streets there 4 hr parking restrictions, unless you have a permit, which you wont get until you have a place sorted.

Shopping, and I mean food shopping, is expensive here, I know it is a big city, but it is much higher than London. In the London we budget £60 a week, and that was the basics, here we are spending on average $200. That is just for two!

You will def need a car. Public transport is good, but you just need a car, its like the states.

Almost all of the schools I have seen are Catholic, so they have the usual criteria.

I dont mean to sound negative, the life style here is second to none, with people of all ages out on walks and bike rides, days at the beach, it really is great, but it has costed a lot more than we had expected.

I hope I have not put you off, but given you some info to help you decide.

If you moved to the UK, I am sure you will have researched it, just make sure you apply the same thinking to moving to OZ.


Right on the money.

There is no coincidence that so many Aussies do the trip the other way around.

When I visited just to think about the parking costs made my head hurt.

Although Australia is huge and mostly self sufficient it is still an smaller country in population terms, and basically an island, isolated from the rest of the world. That means it is expensive to get stuff there, which is reflected in the prices.

As for culture, what was available in Sydney was hugely disappointing, it simplly not compares remotely with the variety available in the UK, and London in particular.

Hope you enjoy Sydney, but that is all you will enjoy, the closest big town should be 1000km away :D
 

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I am Qualified

Why have you been unable to get QTS?
I got all my qualifications in the UK, I have just not started to apply for teaching work in OZ as I want a holiday... and need time to think about weighing up the life style and the cost of living. If you ever want to leave OZ, you will do so with hardly any savings.
 

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The usual reasons for not gaining QTS include not finding a school willing and able to support you on overseas trained teachers programme, no vacancies on OTTP (it's often fully subscribed for a year or more and availability outside big cities is limited) and unsatifactory progress on the programme (though this is less common and usually only affects those with poor command of English).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just registered to fill you in on some details with moving to OZ.

I am from the UK, I taught in North London for two years before deciding to move to Sydney with my wife. We are a young couple (Late 20's) and had nothing to lose.

I have not started to look for teaching work yet, as I am here on a working holiday visa and wanted to have a small holiday first.

We stayed with friends for the first week and looked for flats to rent.

Renting flats in Sydney works like this:

You find a flat/house you like the look of online or in the windows of the estate agents. You ring them and ask to view the property. You turn up on the day and find (In our experience) at least 14 other couples looking to rent the same flat. They have viewings twice a week. It is very competitive, I have even been in a situation where the agent asked all parties who were interested to stay behind and then had them compete for the property like an auction, with the rent going through the roof. If you like the flat/house you ask for a form and go away to fill it in. There is a point system, you need 100 points to qualify even before your details are shown to a landlord.

You get points for things like:
Two work ref (40 points)
Previous landlord ref(40 points)
Bank statement etc....

Being from the uk and with out a job lined up, we had to scrape the barrel to get enough points.

My advice, find estate agents online now and ask them what you need to get the 100points for their agency, they do differ from place to place.

The average price of one bed room flats in north Sydney (again from our experience) is about $400.

Now here is the kicker, for that price you get nothing near the quality of flat you get in the UK. They are small, no out door space, which you need here as it has been 30 degrees at 9 in the moring! You get a tiny kitchen with an old old oven/stove and sink. Almost all Australians take their fridge with them, so you will most likely have to buy or rent a fridge.

Parking here is very expensive, even on residential streets there 4 hr parking restrictions, unless you have a permit, which you wont get until you have a place sorted.

Shopping, and I mean food shopping, is expensive here, I know it is a big city, but it is much higher than London. In the London we budget £60 a week, and that was the basics, here we are spending on average $200. That is just for two!

You will def need a car. Public transport is good, but you just need a car, its like the states.

Almost all of the schools I have seen are Catholic, so they have the usual criteria.

I dont mean to sound negative, the life style here is second to none, with people of all ages out on walks and bike rides, days at the beach, it really is great, but it has costed a lot more than we had expected.

I hope I have not put you off, but given you some info to help you decide.

If you moved to the UK, I am sure you will have researched it, just make sure you apply the same thinking to moving to OZ.
Thank you for the time you have taken to answer my query... you have certainly given me food for thought. And NO, you haven't put me off although I'm not sure that Oz is for me...perhaps NZ will be a better choice. Teaching here in the UK is TOUGH!!!!! I would love to know how it compares to teaching in OZ or NZ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The question, sorry was for the person who posted the original question.
HI...sorry...I seem to be battling to understand how this forum works...
It is a long story why I never managed to gain QTS...basically it took me time to find a school willing to support me through the OTTP and because it is a job share, there isn't enough time to get QTS before my 4 years are up. I have found the system to be unbending and unsympathetic...but there is little point whinging about it. Although I have the sympathy of the school there is nothing they can do to help change the situation.
 

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Thank you for the time you have taken to answer my query... you have certainly given me food for thought. And NO, you haven't put me off although I'm not sure that Oz is for me...perhaps NZ will be a better choice. Teaching here in the UK is TOUGH!!!!! I would love to know how it compares to teaching in OZ or NZ...
Hi - Topcat from the NZ forum here.

We have a couple of friends who are teachers. One taught in a tough area of London (Stratford), and is now teaching in one of the lower decile schools in South Auckland. She loves the teaching and the kids here (mainly Maori and South Pacific Islanders in her school), and reckons that compared to the kids in Stratford they're 'pussycats'.

I must admit the description of renting an apartment in Sydney was a bit of an eye opener - I don't think you have to do the same in NZ. And I don't think rents are as expensive. Let's put it this way, we have a 3 double-bedroomed house that we rent out in an Eastern suburb of Auckland and it's $450 NZD per week.

There are many one-bedroomed places in Auckland City that come fully furnished, including refrigerator. Parking - outside of the centre it would be free to park on the streets, in the centre you can get weekly/monthly parking for $30 NZD per week if you shop around.

Food - we probably spend about $200 NZD - but I hate to admit there's a few bottles of wine in that :eek:

Oh - and just to say also that Sydney is not the whole of Oz - consider the other cities too. Melbourne is supposed to be very different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A great reply, very encouraging...thank you!!!! NZ seems to be the option we are going to try...loads of things I will miss about the UK though!
 

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....loads of things I will miss about the UK though!
ah yes.... Real Marmite, Taramasada, Melton Mowbray pork pies, 'English' style corned beef, decent 'English' style pork sausages from Tesco.

Oh and history. There is history here, but it (like crime) is on a different scale.

Still wouldn't go back to the UK to live though :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As an overseas trained teacher are/were you able to find enough work? In what area do you live?
Yes......I get loads of work!!!! Long term and day-to-day supply. Many schools request me back which is partly why I have been so 'lucky' with work. Hardly a day goes by when I don't have work although I do sometimes turn down some.
I live in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire. Unfortunately I won't be allowed to continue with supply teaching after September because of the '4 year' rule and that is partly why we are considering a move to NZ now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes......I get loads of work!!!! Long term and day-to-day supply. Many schools request me back which is partly why I have been so 'lucky' with work. Hardly a day goes by when I don't have work although I do sometimes turn down some.
I live in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire. Unfortunately I won't be allowed to continue with supply teaching after September because of the '4 year' rule and that is partly why we are considering a move to NZ now. Why?... Are you considering supply in the UK?
 

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Yes......I get loads of work!!!! Long term and day-to-day supply. Many schools request me back which is partly why I have been so 'lucky' with work. Hardly a day goes by when I don't have work although I do sometimes turn down some.
I live in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire. Unfortunately I won't be allowed to continue with supply teaching after September because of the '4 year' rule and that is partly why we are considering a move to NZ now.
It is great to hear that you get loads of work. I go on the TES website and a lot of supply teachers are saying they don't get enough work. I am moving to the Midlands, hopefully I will get enough work. Do you have any advice on how I can get known in the schools, or any advice in general about teaching in England? I have 7 years teaching experience here in Ontario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It is great to hear that you get loads of work. I go on the TES website and a lot of supply teachers are saying they don't get enough work. I am moving to the Midlands, hopefully I will get enough work. Do you have any advice on how I can get known in the schools, or any advice in general about teaching in England? I have 7 years teaching experience here in Ontario.
Luckily I have only been with one agent all this time...I know of many supply teachers that have had to register with two or more agents to keep the work coming in. It is very important that your classroom management is strong and you know how to handle yourself in a disruptive class, mark all work the class has done with you, and you don't leave the classroom in a mess. Familiarise yourself with the National Curriculum, esp maths which is organised into blocks. Leave a note at the end of the day to the class teacher about your day/class behaviour /lessons, etc. Have a backup plan as more often than not it is difficult to understand the planning left for you which can be very stressful. Supply work is tough as you are walking into a class 'cold' but if you do a good job, schools will request you back. Good luck.
 
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