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In France you have no choice but to use a notaire. These are not solicitors in the uk sense. If you are buying then the seller prob already has the notaire in place. Property deals are not (usually) confrontational as in the uk.

Good luck!

DejW
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In France you have no choice but to use a notaire. These are not solicitors in the uk sense. If you are buying then the seller prob already has the notaire in place. Property deals are not (usually) confrontational as in the uk. Good luck! DejW
Many thanks I understand I can use the same but a solicitor here has told me to use an expert to ensure there's no pitfalls!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In France you have no choice but to use a notaire. These are not solicitors in the uk sense. If you are buying then the seller prob already has the notaire in place. Property deals are not (usually) confrontational as in the uk. Good luck! DejW
I know I pay the Notaire fees but is there any stamp duty tax equivalent on top like here?!!
 

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I know I pay the Notaire fees but is there any stamp duty tax equivalent on top like here?!!
Where's "here" ? :confused: (you haven't filled your profile in and some of us aren't psychic!)


It's the notaire's job to do the conveyancing, they are trained and qualified so I guess you can call them 'experts'. Suggest you read the guide hils suggested, then when you understand the process and the fees, you can decide whether you are happy to follow the normal French procedure or whether you still feel the need to pay an additional 'expert'. If you do, he wouldn't be authorised to do conveyancing, he would simply be there to advise you. I know some people do this, although it seems like a waste of (a lot of) money to me - property transactions are expensive enough already IMHO and your notaire will explain anything you're not sure about and advise on inheritance issues etc, it's part of what you're paying him for - but I guess they feel it gives them extra reassurance.
 

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FWIW I've done or been very close to 5 property deals in France. Usually it's only 1 notaire involved and I've been impressed by their impartiality and efforts to make sure everyone understands - particularly non French participants. The notaire can insist on an interpreter being present (at your cost) if he / she thinks that your French is not up to it.

Perhaps, if it's a very complex deal, or a real megadeal then you might need your own expert or notaire present, but as €trashy says, usually it's not money well spent.

Forget how the UK system works, it's not like that in France. You can debate whether it's better or not, but it's very different.

DejW
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Many thanks I have now read my book closely and understand, the problem is my barrister friend says I need an expert as she's no knowledge of the process and I do appreciate most share the same one unlike us, v grateful for help, I'll look at my profile!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What is the generally accepted percentage to drop a house price by on offer so as not to offend
Any advice please
 

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What is the generally accepted percentage to drop a house price by on offer so as not to offend
Any advice please
People quote you all sorts of figures and formulas, but in point of fact, it really does depend.

How long has the property been on the market? What are the circumstances (i.e. divorce, inheritance, relocation, etc.)? Single owner or multiple owners (as in a property being sold off by the heirs)? Location, location, location. Any other potential offers on the horizon? Condition of the property? And has the original price been set high or low?

There is also some kind of law here that if the estate agent brings in an offer for the asking price or better, the sellers have to accept it over any lower offer.

Happened to friends of mine who were inclined to accept an offer somewhat lower than their asking price because of ties to the potential buyers. Estate agent swooped in with an offer for full price and claimed that they had to accept it. Possibly due to the "exclusive" contract they had with the agent, but in any event it was a legal requirement.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I believe the law says that if you have your house on the market for X euros, and somebody offers you X euros, you cannot refuse it. I guess the point is, you can't refuse an offer of the full asking price just because you don't like the look of the person who has offered it, or also because you want to be able to say you have your house on the market for tax reasons but you don't actually want to sell it. Of course, if you had already formally accepted another offer your house would no longer be on the market so this wouldn't apply.
 

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What is the generally accepted percentage to drop a house price by on offer so as not to offend
Any advice please
At least 20% or more if you can, it's a buyers market. We took a huge hit on ours because we needed to move and it was on the market for 8 months.

Before you make an offer (even verbally) make sure that only one agent has shown you the details. If more than one you pay both of them the fees which could get expensive. Also make sure you get the full set of diagnostics before the offer is final.

There is a good description of the process and the things to watch out for on AngloInfo.

Cheers
 
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