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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, my father is thinking about moving to France. He is a non-French EU citizen (not British so won't be affected by the result of the referendum) but has never paid a single penny in either taxes or social security contributions to his country of citizenship as he has never lived there (in case you are wondering why, he was born in one of its former colonies). So he can't get an EHIC card as the first thing that they ask for when getting one is his SS number, which he doesn't have. He is above 67, and has no pension whatsoever either from his non-EU country of residence or elsewhere. Would he be able to get a Carte Vitale and get reimbursed in case he goes to the hospital/ the doctor? If I will also be moving to France (before he will) and will be paying taxes and social security, does this affect his situation at all? Thanks a lot for your help - all the existing websites on SS in France seem to only include details about EU citizens WITH an EHIC.
 

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Does he have any source of income? Savings, a private pension, etc.

Because the main criteria seems to be that he needs to be resident in France for a period of 3 months before he can apply. ameli.fr - La CMU de base n'existe plus And he'll be asked to validate his "regular and stable" residence every year or so.

The fact of your living and working here doesn't really seem to play into the situation - except if you're offering him a place to live. (You will probably have to confirm that on a regular basis.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Bev. So if he were to shuttle back and forth between France and abroad (eg. half a year in France then half abroad) he would likely be ineligible for CMU. Do you happen to know whether it's possible to get a mutuelle without being covered by the CMU in the first place?
 

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Also, it says 'Si vous êtes ressortissant de l'EEE/Suisse et que vous êtes « inactif » : vous êtes dispensé de la production d'un titre ou document de séjour mais vous devez justifier de ressources suffisantes et d'une assurance maladie « complète »' on the link you've posted. Surely if he has a 'complete' health insurance he doesn't need to be covered by the CMU anyway? Or is there another meaning of 'complete'? Thanks.
 

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Also, it says 'Si vous êtes ressortissant de l'EEE/Suisse et que vous êtes « inactif » : vous êtes dispensé de la production d'un titre ou document de séjour mais vous devez justifier de ressources suffisantes et d'une assurance maladie « complète »' on the link you've posted. Surely if he has a 'complete' health insurance he doesn't need to be covered by the CMU anyway? Or is there another meaning of 'complete'? Thanks.
You have to have health insurance that covers you until you are accepted for the CMU (now PUMA).

However, if he's spending 6 months in each country he would probably need private health cover as this situation would considerably complicate being attached to the French health system via PUMA to the point that it would be unmanangeable and there would be little point anyway (i.e. at best 3 months cover per year, given the proof of residence requirements and the requirement to notify when you depart the country, not to mention the processing time).
 

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To be classed as 'legally resident' in France and therefore able to affiliate to PUMA he would probably be expected to demonstrate a sufficient income to live on and evidence that he's been living there for 3 months minimum with health cover in force (does he own a house, will he be renting a house?). If he can do that, he should be accepted and billed for cotisations depending on income.

Depending where abroad he shuttles to, if it's in the EU (eg the UK) his French healthcare would cover him for occasional trips, if not it wouldn't.

A mutuelle tops up your state healthcare. You need state healthcare before you can top it up.
 

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I suspect that if he is ducking in and out of France he may be considered NOT to be living in France in a "regular and stable" manner. Private health insurance would seem to be a better option for him, particularly since France is not the only country that requires private cover for those not part of the national health system for any reason. A private insurance would offer cross-border coverage.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone, I'll look into the options. I've got another question on income taxes in France so I'll tag it on this post anyway. I've read that there's a 10% reduction in taxable income, is this done automatically or would I have to fill in the reduction myself? Also is it 10% off 'salaire net' or 'imposable'? Are there any good guides on reporting income you can recommend (both French and English should be ok)?
 

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In France, "we do it all for you" should be the motto of the Fisc. You merely fill in a "declaration" declaring the various amounts (and these days the Fisc actually fills in the proper amounts for salary and certain benefits). They then perform all the calculations, including subtracting the 10% and crediting back some of the figures you get from the bank.

If you don't have much other than your salary, the French system is really quite efficient and quick to deal with.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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