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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi, can any one tell me the rules regarding social charges and income in france, we are going to live full time in france and our only income will be €4000 from a rental property here in france. this will be all we will get live on until we can sort out another income(ie auto-entrepreneur)would you have to pay the charge on this amount or is there a minimum amount of money you need to have in order to live ,
 

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You will pay a social charge on rental income (though France is pretty good on giving you various automatic allowances against the gross rental income), though it's not the kind of social charge that would allow you entry into the French health care or retirement system. (French national motto should be: Never do anything simply if there is a more complex way to do things.) The flat percentage you'll pay is actually a tax to pay down the debt from the social insurance system.

You will be required to have private health care coverage (unless, of course, you have an S-1 form and can claim reciprocal coverage based on your UK coverage).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hi thanks for your reply,we were actually living in ireland for the past 20 years and having both lost our jobs 5 years ago we were claiming benefits and have a health card from there . with no prospects at all there we decided to come to france as we already had the house here to try a new start in order to do that we had to come of the benefits .i cant get my head around what ive been told with regards the income here,if we become resident and only have the 4000 as our only income we will have a percentage stopped ,i dont think you get any financial aid here maybe reduced habitation tax ,would that be right to be left with around 3000 to live on and try to start auto- ent business to boost our income
 

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why do you not start up your AE business and run it for a few months on a very liitle income, this will get you on to the French health care system after a few payments have been made.
you can have a small turnover and pay 24% payments on that, there is no lower limit to pay so once you have made a few payments , french bureaucratic cogs will start to turn, very slowly.
By the way what type of business are you going to run under the AE scheme as there are some business types not allowed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the wife was thinking as a market stall holder and for me a handy man, we know we can get approx 4000 in rental and the irish eu health card is valid for 2 years, its just understanding what stoppages we will have on a very small initial income, we are led to believe there will be no state help for low earners apart from discount on habitation tax so it seems very harsh to loose around a quarter of what little you get.
 

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My favourite subject, not!

We will only have a S1 for approx 9 months so will have to take out medical cover via private insurance. The one saving grace is that it should exempt us from most of the CSg charge on our pensions which should partially offset the cost of the health ins. However after 5 yrs residency we can then have access to the French health system but I am assuming that we will then pay both the full csg charge plus a further 8% cmu charge. Can anyone produce an idiots guide to how to calculate these charges, e.g. What is the starting point and what gets deducted. I appreciate that these charges are moving targets but I need to have a good understanding as to how they re calculated as I need to get some idea of future cots so that I can work out how much I want to pay post the S1expiry, how much excess I can stand and then work out how much it could cost for drugs etc for existing complaints which are unlikely t o be covered by the health insurance unless I want to take out a mortgage!
 

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there are few handymen in France as any type of building work has severe restrictions on it. you basically have to do minor work and very basic menial work, that is on paper. what area are you planning on relocating to. look at the local chambre of commerce and they should be able to help. not sure about a stall holder.
 

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the irish eu health card is valid for 2 years
Maybe it's different with the Irish health card but if what you are talking about is the equivalent of the UK EHIC/French CEAM/etc, this is a card that covers you while you are a temporary visitor to another country. It becomes invalid as soon as you stop being a member of the social security system of the country that issued the card, which normally means, when you move to a different country.

Maybe Ireland has a different arrangement, but do make sure you're not going to get a nasty shock by finding out that you are not covered when you thought you were.
 

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There is a big difference between one of those health cards and the type of certificate of national health coverage that would get you reciprocal coverage in the French health care system.

You said that you lost your jobs 5 years ago - which makes it seem like you're probably not eligible for reciprocal coverage in France. If you were on unemployment in Ireland, you'd only be able to collect it in France for about 3 months. And at this point, 3 months is not enough time to find a job in France.

Moving to France is no solution to your problems. To be eligible for benefits, you will have to contribute to the system for a certain period of time. I suspect it's similar in Ireland for people newly arrived there.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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