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As this topic has reared its head in two recent threads, I thought I would create a seperate thread so we can discuss / debate constructively.

A question I'm constantly asked here is 'Where are you from?', when I say England, the response I am nearly alway met with '...where are you really from?'

Personally, I think of myself as British Asian as I was born & bred in London but my parents are originally from Pakistan & India (made for interesting times when the cricket was on!).

However, if for example, I moved to USA and suddenly had a blue instead of a maroon passport, I wouldn't suddenly call myself American....

Thoughts?


Mods - please don't close as you did my previous thead - we'll try to be good :D
 

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If you were born in Country A, and both of your parents are from Country A, then Country A is your nationality whether you like it or not.

Anything that deviates from that, then I guess you're free to choose the country of birth or parents nationality or whatever.

Just living in a country long enough to get a passport doesn't mean you're from there in my opinion.

Not that any of it really matters, if I was in charge, I'd remove all borders and let people go wherever they want.
 

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In your case I think even the "original" people of the UK won't consider you as a UK citizen, right? So I believe it's better to keep attached to your culture and your people, but not to isolate your self from the society around you... even if you meet racist jerks on your way...
 

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For my self, my both parents were born in Palestine and they were forced to leave to Jordan. I was born in Jordan and lived my life in Jordan. I am Jordanian with Palestinian heart.
 

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In your case I think even the "original" people of the UK won't consider you as a UK citizen, right? So I believe it's better to keep attached to your culture and your people, but not to isolate your self from the society around you... even if you meet racist jerks on your way...
The thing about places like the UK, Canada, Australia and the US though is that it is filled with immigrants. The people that move there and live there permanently and integrate themselves into the culture actually do end up becoming British or Canadian or Australian or American. My sister immigrated to Australia over 10 years ago and both my nieces have been there all their lives. My nieces are Australian, they've never been to India and know more about Australia than India.

I think second generation citizens have a right to call themselves that particular nationality not based on the passport alone. Indo is American just like Sherry is British because they were born and raised there. But the people that move to a country, get the passport and then move back to Dubai, those people CANNOT say that they are "originally" from that particular country because they now hold a different coloured passport.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Majority of Brits that I know do agree / accept me as a Brit - to my face at least...who knows whats really going on in that brain of theirs hehe. On a serious note, the English Defence League has seen a sharp rise in numbers in recent years esp since the recession [yikes!]

Also, whenever Eng vs Pak / India are playing I'm asked - who will you support? Which unfortunately is a fair point as I know a number of British born asians who would support anyone but England and talk about 'back home' referring to where their parents were born - regardless of whether they've actually lived there or not!

This used to frustrate me as if things are so rosy 'back home' why don't you go home and support that economy. However, being an expat in DXB now - I'm always reminscing about 'back home' (UK!) but have no desire to move back lol
 

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what's the point of saying you are from country A if you can't speak the language, don't know much about its culture (or even worse: reject it), don't eat its traditional food, dress the way the majority dress, watch, read, and admire any form of art BUT the one generated in the country, hate the religious majority, and only marry within minority communities?

the passport and the sticker up your car a^&*? both can be bought, but they don't tell your real identity.
 

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My sister immigrated to Australia over 10 years ago and both my nieces have been there all their lives. My nieces are Australian, they've never been to India and know more about Australia than India.
The thing is that some prople will consider your nieces Indian. And when you nieces will have children they will also be considered Indian as to some , what you look like is all that matters....
 

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The thing is that some people will consider your nieces Indian. And when you nieces will have children they will also be considered Indian as to some , what you look like is all that matters....
True and they will face this challenge all their life. But this is why it is their parent's responsibility to make sure that they are aware of their roots. They do not need to have Indian culture shoved down their throats but just a simple awareness goes a long way. Unfortunately my sister doesn't have the same point of view and I can't change it.
 

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what you look like is all that matters....
before coming to dubai, i always wondered why michael jackson killed himself to look caucasian...

7 years here, and it's all clear to me...
 

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True and they will face this challenge all their life. But this is why it is their parent's responsibility to make sure that they are aware of their roots. They do not need to have Indian culture shoved down their throats but just a simple awareness goes a long way. Unfortunately my sister doesn't have the same point of view and I can't change it.
Is it a challenge? or just a truth?
 

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Is it a challenge? or just a truth?
Fact: They are Australian

Challenge: They look Indian because of their ancestry.

Like I said before, second generation citizens that are born within a certain society and grow up within that society belong to that particular society.

My sister and her husband are Indian and they do not go around claiming to be Australians even though they have the Australian passport and have been living there for over 10 years. During the World Cup, they support India, wear the Indian jersey, etc. They did not drop their origins because of the new passport.
 

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Eng.Khaled said:
For my self, my both parents were born in Palestine and they were forced to leave to Jordan. I was born in Jordan and lived my life in Jordan. I am Jordanian with Palestinian heart.
100% agree with this...bloodline is important.
 

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As this topic has reared its head in two recent threads, I thought I would create a seperate thread so we can discuss / debate constructively.

A question I'm constantly asked here is 'Where are you from?', when I say England, the response I am nearly alway met with '...where are you really from?'

Personally, I think of myself as British Asian as I was born & bred in London but my parents are originally from Pakistan & India (made for interesting times when the cricket was on!).

However, if for example, I moved to USA and suddenly had a blue instead of a maroon passport, I wouldn't suddenly call myself American....

Thoughts?


Mods - please don't close as you did my previous thead - we'll try to be good :D
Afternoon all

Can totally relate to where Sherry is coming from here. Not so much in UK (or maybe have forgotten) but more here especially from other Pakistanis. Their other question is whether I can speak 'hairdo' (aka urdu) or not?' To which I reply 'what has that got to do with the price of fish?' Doesn't tell you anything about me other than the fact I can speak a particular language.

Guess people like to place others or find some sort of familiarity about them. Pity it makes it seem isolationist rather then open

ttfn

:biggrin1:
 

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People. If you don't care about knowing yours other people would care and they make books about this. Again it's all about the culture.
Its one thing to know one's ancestry. It is another thing to place excessive importance on this to the point that people refuse to marry into any place outside their tribe because they dont want to "mix blood".

In many cases nowadays, references to bloodline isnt used in a good way, its more a way of trying to put others down with the belief that someone who had interbreeding in his family for generations is somehow purer and better than someone who has ancestors from more than one race .
 
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