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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't seem to find anything in the Loi 6 juillet 1989 that adresses if a landlord can begin showing a rented house (principal residence, furnished, but three year lease because of renewals) before the end of the lease term. The statute is long, and maybe my French isn't up to the task. Or maybe it's covered elsewhere in the Code, or not at all. Assume that the statute was followed in giving the required conge'. Owner wants to sell. Thanks folks.
 

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When we were looking for an investment property a couple of years back we were shown at least 2 which were tenanted at the time. After all it proved the viability of the property on the letting market.
Having a tenant in situ when viewing is not unusual imo.
Visits were timed to suit the tenant.
I know I spoke to one of the tenants then and she seemed to have no problem about prospective landlords visiting.
Much better imo than the alternative prospect of old landlord turning up one day to introduce for the first time the new one after the sale has been completed.
Sorry no idea about the law you asked about.
 

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I can't seem to find anything in the Loi 6 juillet 1989 that adresses if a landlord can begin showing a rented house (principal residence, furnished, but three year lease because of renewals) before the end of the lease term. The statute is long, and maybe my French isn't up to the task. Or maybe it's covered elsewhere in the Code, or not at all. Assume that the statute was followed in giving the required conge'. Owner wants to sell. Thanks folks.
I found this on service-public:

https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F1857

Si le contrat de bail le prévoit, lorsque le locataire donne congé ou lorsque le logement est mis en vente, le bailleur ou son représentant (agent immobilier notamment) dispose d'un droit de visite. Ces visites ont pour objectif la remise en location du logement ou sa vente. Les conditions de ces visites doivent être déterminées d'un commun accord entre le propriétaire et le locataire. Ces visites ne doivent pas être organisées :

ni un jour férié,
ni pendant plus de 2 heures les jours ouvrables.
Hope this helps.
 

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I was in the same situation a year ago and it was unpleasant, BUT they have every right to show it. You have the right to say when they can come. In fact, someone advised me that I could set specific days and times of day that realtors could visit.
So, yes they can come, but you get to call the shots regarding when/how often.
I eventually moved before the term of my lease was up because I hated it so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the input. Very helpful. I wonder what standard notice is. A day? And could they really bring someone every day? Do you have to answer the phone? They can't bring someone when you're gone, I assume.
 

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It's one of the downsides of being a tenant as opposed to being an owner.

As softouch said, at least in France you get to 'call the shots' - within reason.

No one likes it. Even if you own the property and are living in it, it's a pain (but at least you have some motivation).
 

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Thanks for all the input. Very helpful. I wonder what standard notice is. A day? And could they really bring someone every day? Do you have to answer the phone? They can't bring someone when you're gone, I assume.
I was told by a friend who owns several apartments that she rents out that you may lay the ground rules within reason. For example, you make the place available on Monday through Friday after 5 pm for appointments and you require at least 24 hours notice of any visit. No drop ins. Your landlord may not enter without notifying you. I required them to come only when I was at home and it was pre-arranged with me. I think my landlord was happy when I decided to move. :D
 

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I wonder what standard notice is. A day? And could they really bring someone every day? Do you have to answer the phone? They can't bring someone when you're gone, I assume.
We were usually contacted by email asking if it would be OK if M et Mme *** came to view on such and such a day; occasionally the landlady called by and asked directly - but always in advance.
We would have approx 2 or 3 visits a week; once we had one visit immediately following another - that was a pain.

No, the landlord/landlady has no right to show anyone round if you are not there.

Sue
 
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