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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Currently we are trying to rent an apartment in Paris for the second part of my sabbatical (5 months in the spring). We are looking at several places, from web sites such as sabbaticalhomes. The place we might want to take is asking us for the following (the owners are French):

- sign a detailed 1-year contract, with the possibility to cancel when we actually depart (we need to send a registered letter for that...)
- tenants' insurance
- references, proof of income, copy of passports, a 1-month deposit
- agree to a clause saying we'd be responsible for certain "rental repairs" (according to some conseil d'etat decree)

Most of this only came to light after we showed interest in the place.

I guess I understand for the most part, but so far we didn't expect e.g. that we'd have to cover tenants' insurance for a short-term rental, or the purpose/impolications of that clause about rental repairs.

Is all of the above normal for a 5-month rental?
 

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Tenant's insurance is normal for a short-term let. I paid it on my last apt that I rented for 4 mos.

I believe it is customary on some lets for the tenant to be responsible for small rental repairs like leaky faucets, even yearly boiler maintenance but larger problems like the fridge stops working is the landlord's problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot! That's helpful!

Does anyone else have experiences with / more information about "rental repairs"? There seem to be some stories of people having issues with this in Paris (I only heard second hand). Should we be concerned?
 

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Thanks a lot! That's helpful!

Does anyone else have experiences with / more information about "rental repairs"? There seem to be some stories of people having issues with this in Paris (I only heard second hand). Should we be concerned?
You might want to have a look at this model contract Télécharger Contrat de location meublé type (modèle Alur) (gratuit)

Re

- agree to a clause saying we'd be responsible for certain "rental repairs" (according to some conseil d'etat decree)
You don't give details so it's impossible to provide a specific response. That said, tenants are responsible for certain repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh, sorry. The wording is: we are obliged...

"de prendre à sa charge l’entretien courant du logement ainsi que l’ensemble des réparations locatives définies par décret au Conseil d’Etat, sauf si elles sont occasionnées par vétusté, malfaçon, vice de construction, cas fortuit ou de force majeure"
 

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I wouldn't worry if the lease states as you say. It generally relates to minor repairs or damage caused by the tenant. "des réparations locatives définies par décret au Conseil d’Etat, sauf si elles sont occasionnées par vétusté, malfaçon, vice de construction, cas fortuit ou de force majeure" would simply mean anything that is legislated at the time. See attached link for current tenant responsibilities re repairs and maintenance.

https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F31697

The really important thing is to ensure that you undertake a full état des lieux with the landlord when you take up the lease, recording everything that could be considered damage, vétusté or anything that requires repair by the landlord (photos are an excellent idea), that is duly signed by both yourself and the landlord. You also need to ensure that a full état des lieux is completed, agreed and signed by yourself and the landlord when you depart. The état des lieux would normally take several hours and should not be rushed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks a lot, EH! But wow, do you really mean several hours for a walk-through? This is a small 1br apartment.

I guess what we are wondering about is what if something breaks that still works when we move in but breaks later (wear and tear)...
 

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Thanks a lot, EH! But wow, do you really mean several hours for a walk-through? This is a small 1br apartment.

I guess what we are wondering about is what if something breaks that still works when we move in but breaks later (wear and tear)...
It's NOT a walk-through, it's a detailed inspection and the paperwork has to be properly completed and signed by both parties. You check all the windows and doors, blinds, flooring, furniiture and pay attention to such things as stains, scratches, etc plus signs of wear. Otherwise you can find yourself paying out on all sorts of things when you leave. If some needs fixing, replacing etc by the landlord, that needs to be included (ideally with a timeframe) on the forms and properly signed off. Clearly this has to be done once the property has been vacated by the previous tenant and most commonly is done the day before moving in.

If you are talking about, say, a refrigerator that is functioning when you take the apartment, responsibility would likely depend on aga and the report of the serviceman. In such circumstances, you could for example contact the landlord and let them know, agree re who calls the serviceman (remembering that the appliance could still be under warranty) and take it from there. If it's a result of your negligence, then you could expect to pay.
 

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EverHopeful wrote : The really important thing is to ensure that you undertake a full état des lieux with the landlord when you take up the lease, recording everything that could be considered damage, vétusté or anything that requires repair by the landlord (photos are an excellent idea), that is duly signed by both yourself and the landlord. You also need to ensure that a full état des lieux is completed, agreed and signed by yourself and the landlord when you depart. The état des lieux would normally take several hours and should not be rushed.

To which Travel_Phil replied : But wow, do you really mean several hours for a walk-through? This is a small 1br apartment.

The point EH is making is really valid in that an état des lieux is not a walk-through. It is a minutely detailed sweep of everything, absolutely everything.
My super French neighbours made me aware of how careful you need to be .. for example : some of the floor tiles in our salon had small chips on the edge and I wanted these noted on the list so that I was not accused of having chipped them when we left.
The bathroom basin was slightly cracked so I refused to accept that unless it was replaced. It was, then I agreed to sign that it was fine.
This is why the E des L 'entrant' is v important or you can find you have a big bill from the E des L 'sortant' when you leave.

Sue
 

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Just add to the importance of this.

When we left a flat in Paris some years ago the guy who did the 'état des lieux' said the flat was in better condition than when we moved in.....he was very impressed. However, what we failed to spot and he spotted was a slightly broken shower hose that would cost 8 euros from any brico store to replace. We got CHARGED 70 EUROS (deducted from our caution) to have a plumber to come out and replace it. It would have taken him less than 30 seconds.

Be very careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you very much, all of you. This is really helpful!

We had a long conversation with the potential landlord by phone, and we feel reassured now. Since they rent the apartment to us furnished, most things would be their responsibility. They do not expect anything would happen that we are responsible for (unless we cause damage) due to our short stay. But we will be careful with the Etat des Lieux! (And we already saw the place and know that it's generally in very good condition.)
 
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