Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to go to the UK soon with my two kids while waiting for my husband to join us, and would like to find a temporary rental somewhere in a medium sized, self-sufficient town. We wouldn't have a car most likely.

Where do I look? Are there particular areas where short term lets are more abundandtly available? Would be fun to have things around for kids to do, and great nature. We plan to spend this time taking trips to different places to see where we would like to settle long term.

We're sort of open to anything at this point, anywhere, as long as it's central and affordable (hopefully under 400 pounds a month).

thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,612 Posts
I want to go to the UK soon with my two kids while waiting for my husband to join us, and would like to find a temporary rental somewhere in a medium sized, self-sufficient town. We wouldn't have a car most likely.

Where do I look? Are there particular areas where short term lets are more abundandtly available? Would be fun to have things around for kids to do, and great nature. We plan to spend this time taking trips to different places to see where we would like to settle long term.

We're sort of open to anything at this point, anywhere, as long as it's central and affordable (hopefully under 400 pounds a month).

thanks!!
England may not be a big country but you really need to narrow your search down a bit. The one thing I can say is that you'll be hard pushed to find somewhere in your price range in or around London or the surrounding areas. That said, there are many other towns and cities in England, but I think the 400 pounds if you want two bedrooms is not gonna be easy to find in many of them. So your choice of area maybe limited and not quite what you want. I know in my home town of Worthing, West sussex, which comparitively, isnt that expensive, you could possibly rent a two bedroom flat for 400 ish, but that wouldnt include council tax and would probably be in the back end of the town

Price tends to reflect the area, so the cheaper places tend to be in the less desirable areas. There are a lot of rental properties in the UK, if you go through an agent, you'll have to undergo a credit check and very few do rentals for under 6 months, mostly they like 9 months or a year. If you go through the local newspapers and rent privately it maybe slightly cheaper and you maybe able to have shorter rental term

Jo xxx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,151 Posts
I want to go to the UK soon with my two kids while waiting for my husband to join us, and would like to find a temporary rental somewhere in a medium sized, self-sufficient town. We wouldn't have a car most likely.

Where do I look? Are there particular areas where short term lets are more abundandtly available? Would be fun to have things around for kids to do, and great nature. We plan to spend this time taking trips to different places to see where we would like to settle long term.

We're sort of open to anything at this point, anywhere, as long as it's central and affordable (hopefully under 400 pounds a month).
How short is short term rental? Most private lets in UK are for a minimum of 6 months (Assured Shorthold Tenancy), and even if you rent for 3 or 4 months, you still have to pay the remainder of the rent due. Anything less than 6 months will be holiday lets, and will be priced accordingly - expensive. Also £400 a month for a two-bedroom flat (that's the minimum size you want, unless your children want or need separate rooms) is very low, and you are only likely to find properties at that level in northern industrial towns or some seaside towns. Parts of Greater Manchester, Lancashire towns like Blackburn and Burnley (the areas I know well), some in Yorkshire or the North East have low rents. You may also find some in West or East Midlands, but not in the best areas. And properties will be quite basic - livable, but that's about it. You'll be hard pressed to find anything at that level in Southern England, and London will be out of the question - double your budget and you are getting close to the budget end. Having said that, Northern industrial towns can be a great place to live, as they have all the amenities you require for shopping, schools, entertainment, sports etc, and the great outdoors of the Peaks, the Dales and the Lakes are on your doorstep, and easy to reach by public transport. Also cost of living will be lower - Bradford supposedly has lowest prices in England. Remember rents in UK normally exclude utilities, council tax (you get 25% off as a single adult household), telephone, broadband etc, which all add up. Also most flats are unfurnished or partly furnished (fridge, beds etc), unless they are for students. You should realistically raise your budget to £600 a month for rent, to give yourself a wider choice of properties. Having a nearby airport with lots of budget flights will be handy, too. Main ones in the north include Liverpool, Manchester (big international airport with some longhaul), Leeds-Bradford, Newcastle, plus smaller ones like Blackpool, Sheffield, Teeside etc. In the Midlands you have Birmingham and East Midland (Nottingham).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I want to go to the UK soon with my two kids while waiting for my husband to join us, and would like to find a temporary rental somewhere in a medium sized, self-sufficient town. We wouldn't have a car most likely.

Where do I look? Are there particular areas where short term lets are more abundandtly available? Would be fun to have things around for kids to do, and great nature. We plan to spend this time taking trips to different places to see where we would like to settle long term.

We're sort of open to anything at this point, anywhere, as long as it's central and affordable (hopefully under 400 pounds a month).

thanks!!
Hello My name is Irene

You can look on the internet at "www.rightmove.co.uk" or "www.hilberychaplin.co.uk" but I think that you will be surprised how little you will be able to afford for that amount of money. Equally you need to research the area as well. England is expensive to say the least, that is in and around London, I am not sure about the north of England. I do know England very well as my profession has me traveling all over the country, therefore if you want to send me the area you are looking at maybe I can help or know what it is like!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone for your replies.

For rent, I was thinking about getting a studio for a few months until my husband arrives when we would get something bigger, and of course we'd be willing to pay more then.

We're not at all interested in London or the environs. ideally we want something large enough to be self-sufficient. Right now, it seems I might go somewhere in south Europe while I wait for my husband as holiday rentals in England do seem quite expensive comparatively. We don't want to sign a contract right now since I don't even know where we want to stay for longer term.
Well, I have yet to make a final decision, as it depends on when my husband will come over. So keep the suggestions coming;).

But for the near future, if anyone knows whether a landlord would sign a contract with a foreigner who has income from abroad, please let me know. Of course I would able to show proof with pay stubs and such, but not sure how that counts in anoter country. The idea is that I'd be getting an apartment for the whole family about 1-2 months prior my husband leaving the US.

I think at the moment the North sounds appealing. Are there any towns there that are less industrial yet still convenient? Devonshire sounds like a fine place too, but it seems jobs are harder to come by there?

I'd like to narrow down our area of interest before coming as I don't have the means to travel too much with two small children. We're quite a bit on the alternative side, so a place where people have some tolerance for different folks would be best. Easy access to natural/organic foods, straight from the farm, is very important too.

Thanks again!

Hello My name is Irene

You can look on the internet at "www.rightmove.co.uk" or "www.hilberychaplin.co.uk" but I think that you will be surprised how little you will be able to afford for that amount of money. Equally you need to research the area as well. England is expensive to say the least, that is in and around London, I am not sure about the north of England. I do know England very well as my profession has me traveling all over the country, therefore if you want to send me the area you are looking at maybe I can help or know what it is like!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,235 Posts
Speaking as a landlord my agent would expect you to be able to prove income (maybe a letter from your employer) and pay an higher deposit since you won't have a credit record there.

Most studio flats are for one person so you may find difficulty in finding an agent or landlord who will let you rent a studio flat for an adult and two children.

Regards,
Karen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,612 Posts
Devon or cornwall sound like they might be right for your style of living, but you'd need to be in a town if you have no transport. Also as Kas says, you'll possibly have to pay a higher deposit, but you may find something in that area in your price range, but it would be very small and probably unfurnished, also jobs can be hard to come by ???

Jo xxx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We do plan on having a car once husband arrives, though i'd prefer being in a town so i don't have to rely on it. i like the walking lifestyle. i wouldn't have a car though before he gets there, when i'm planning on getting around, checking out different places, maybe the occasional rental for longer trips.

What about devon and cornwall do you think would suit us? any towns you would recommend?

anyone knows about the job situation there?

thanks again.

Devon or cornwall sound like they might be right for your style of living, but you'd need to be in a town if you have no transport. Also as Kas says, you'll possibly have to pay a higher deposit, but you may find something in that area in your price range, but it would be very small and probably unfurnished, also jobs can be hard to come by ???

Jo xxx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,151 Posts
We do plan on having a car once husband arrives, though i'd prefer being in a town so i don't have to rely on it. i like the walking lifestyle. i wouldn't have a car though before he gets there, when i'm planning on getting around, checking out different places, maybe the occasional rental for longer trips.

What about devon and cornwall do you think would suit us? any towns you would recommend?

anyone knows about the job situation there?

thanks again.
What kind of jobs are you after? What are your qualifications and experience?
Cornwall is a blackspot for jobs, and their unemployment level can be among the highest in the country. Sparsely populated and no real industry to speak of (tin mining for which Cornwall was once famous is virtually finished). It has seasonal jobs in summer tourism, but in winter many resorts are dead. Newquay is an exception, as it draws young people on stags and hens round the year and its surfing beaches have a wide appeal.
More-populous Devon has more opportunities, esp around Plymouth/Devonport with its naval base and ferry terminal, and Exeter with its university. But it's an attractive part of the country which draws people from all over, so competition can be keener than in other parts. It's particularly appealing to urbanites who want to relocate for slower pace of life. A lot of Londoners, for example, have moved to Devon to be more self-sufficient and closer to nature, and as a better place to bring up a family. Also property prices are higher than in the North, esp larger houses suitable for a family, and those near the sea or in scenic areas (e.g. Dartmoor) command premium prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't work outside of the house. My husband's experience is working in group homes for developmentally disabled for the past six years. Ideally he wants to find a different job, but he will do pretty much anything, including that. He might be interested in going back to school depending on what's available.

Thanks for the info about cornwall. Devon sounds equally fascinating, but that helps to know it's becoming a bit too attractive for the ex-urban folks.

So you think the North is the best bet for great nature, jobs, and cheaper rents? Is it a large area? What's a good base to start out? Reasonable rents and jobs being most important factors.

Thanks.



What kind of jobs are you after? What are your qualifications and experience?
Cornwall is a blackspot for jobs, and their unemployment level can be among the highest in the country. Sparsely populated and no real industry to speak of (tin mining for which Cornwall was once famous is virtually finished). It has seasonal jobs in summer tourism, but in winter many resorts are dead. Newquay is an exception, as it draws young people on stags and hens round the year and its surfing beaches have a wide appeal.
More-populous Devon has more opportunities, esp around Plymouth/Devonport with its naval base and ferry terminal, and Exeter with its university. But it's an attractive part of the country which draws people from all over, so competition can be keener than in other parts. It's particularly appealing to urbanites who want to relocate for slower pace of life. A lot of Londoners, for example, have moved to Devon to be more self-sufficient and closer to nature, and as a better place to bring up a family. Also property prices are higher than in the North, esp larger houses suitable for a family, and those near the sea or in scenic areas (e.g. Dartmoor) command premium prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,151 Posts
I don't work outside of the house. My husband's experience is working in group homes for developmentally disabled for the past six years. Ideally he wants to find a different job, but he will do pretty much anything, including that. He might be interested in going back to school depending on what's available.

Thanks for the info about cornwall. Devon sounds equally fascinating, but that helps to know it's becoming a bit too attractive for the ex-urban folks.

So you think the North is the best bet for great nature, jobs, and cheaper rents? Is it a large area? What's a good base to start out? Reasonable rents and jobs being most important factors.
I would say somewhere within reach of major cities like Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds. There are some attractive small twons and suburbs, with reasonable rents. For Manchester, look for places like Leigh, Stockport, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Ashton. Better than some rough inner areas like Longsight and Moss Side and cheaper than smart suburbs like Didsbury and anywhere on Cheshire border. Probably Stockport I'd say is pick of the lot, as it's only 10 min by train to Manchester, has a lively centre with good shops, good schools and the lovely Peak District National Park starts on its border with Derbyshire, with buses and trains to take you easily into the heart of the park. Organic food is very easy to find, as most supermarkets stock it.
As for your husband's job, the largest employers in the North are the local authorities, plus a lot of quangos and agencies working on government contracts. There are several charitable bodies, housing associations etc that build and manage accommodation for the disabled, those with special needs etc. Almost all such jobs are publicly advertised, so look out for job bulletins on local authority sites. They are usually in the form of (name of town).gov.uk, so for Stockport it's Stockport Council - Stockport Council Home Page, Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council, Manchester City Council Homepage - Telephone: 0161 234 5000 and so on. He will have to make his own inquiries once he is over here, to create a CV (how resume is called in UK), make applications, attend interviews etc. With recession and reining in of public spending, jobs are hard to find, esp those without UK training and experience, but I'm sure your husband is aware of that. With a spouse visa he will be allowed to work, so that's not a problem. He will need to become thoroughly familiar with UK rules and regulations on disability rights and care, buildings, health & safety etc. He can of course attend college and uni to gain additional qualifications, but remember he will be treated as an international (overseas) student (for not having lived in UK for 3 years) and will have to pay much higher fees, around £8000 to £10000 a year (around 3x local and EU students pay).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for info about jobs. Very helpful.
When you say that he has to become familiar with regulations about disability related issues, do you mean that employers require this before hiring? In the States, that would always be included in the initial training once starting a new job.

In general, do employers always require CVs? In the States, usually only an application is asked for this type of jobs. Resumes are for jobs that require way more education and qualifications.

He wouldn't get schooling in his current field, and knowing it takes three years to qualify for resident tuition, we'd probably wait for that first.
What about training programs/apprenticeships for, say construction related fields? Would residence make a difference in costs?

Devon still seems pretty alluring. Are there any towns that are not so expensive, but still somewhat attractive?
How is Plymouth like?

Thanks.



I would say somewhere within reach of major cities like Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds. There are some attractive small twons and suburbs, with reasonable rents. For Manchester, look for places like Leigh, Stockport, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Ashton. Better than some rough inner areas like Longsight and Moss Side and cheaper than smart suburbs like Didsbury and anywhere on Cheshire border. Probably Stockport I'd say is pick of the lot, as it's only 10 min by train to Manchester, has a lively centre with good shops, good schools and the lovely Peak District National Park starts on its border with Derbyshire, with buses and trains to take you easily into the heart of the park. Organic food is very easy to find, as most supermarkets stock it.
As for your husband's job, the largest employers in the North are the local authorities, plus a lot of quangos and agencies working on government contracts. There are several charitable bodies, housing associations etc that build and manage accommodation for the disabled, those with special needs etc. Almost all such jobs are publicly advertised, so look out for job bulletins on local authority sites. They are usually in the form of (name of town).gov.uk, so for Stockport it's Stockport Council - Stockport Council Home Page, Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council, Manchester City Council Homepage - Telephone: 0161 234 5000 and so on. He will have to make his own inquiries once he is over here, to create a CV (how resume is called in UK), make applications, attend interviews etc. With recession and reining in of public spending, jobs are hard to find, esp those without UK training and experience, but I'm sure your husband is aware of that. With a spouse visa he will be allowed to work, so that's not a problem. He will need to become thoroughly familiar with UK rules and regulations on disability rights and care, buildings, health & safety etc. He can of course attend college and uni to gain additional qualifications, but remember he will be treated as an international (overseas) student (for not having lived in UK for 3 years) and will have to pay much higher fees, around £8000 to £10000 a year (around 3x local and EU students pay).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,151 Posts
Thanks for info about jobs. Very helpful.
When you say that he has to become familiar with regulations about disability related issues, do you mean that employers require this before hiring? In the States, that would always be included in the initial training once starting a new job.

In general, do employers always require CVs? In the States, usually only an application is asked for this type of jobs. Resumes are for jobs that require way more education and qualifications.

He wouldn't get schooling in his current field, and knowing it takes three years to qualify for resident tuition, we'd probably wait for that first.
What about training programs/apprenticeships for, say construction related fields? Would residence make a difference in costs?

Devon still seems pretty alluring. Are there any towns that are not so expensive, but still somewhat attractive?
How is Plymouth like?
In the competitive job market today, most shortlisted applicants have experience and training in similar industries and those who don't go to the bottom of the pile. While there will be induction and more job-specfic training for the successful candidates, unless your husband is going for a training post where no previous knowledge or experience is required, he is unlikely to get a look in. His overseas experience may help, but most employers are looking for relevant UK experience and training, so the more homework he can do, the stronger his application.
In the public sector work, you normally complete an application form which they provide (may be done online), and usually you are asked to submit a letter of application (or a statement in support of your application) in which you show how you can meet all the job and person specs they are looking for. Sometimes a CV is requested so you need to prepare one according to local norm. He can go on training courses to improve his chances of a job. Job Centres have details.
Construction industry (building trade) is in the doldrums because of the recession with big unemployment among skilled workers. Many training courses are being pulled as companies are no longer sending students and apprentices, so colleges aren't getting the much-needed fees income. Most training is done on a day release basis where you attend a course for one or two days while continuing your paid work. There are full-time courses for specific trade within construction (e.g. plumber, electrician, heating engineer, bricklayer, decorator etc) , and fees for those vary, but usually non-home and non-EU students pay significantly more (as they don't attract government funding). There are some cheap or free 'hobby' courses for those who want to dabble in DIY, but they don't lead to recognised qualification.
Plymouth is an attractive city with a long maritime history (Captain Drake, navy etc) and the countryside is attractive. Exeter, as I have said, has a famous and well-regarded university (ranks just below Oxbridge) and is a very fine city with a cathedral and some service industries. Other towns like Torquay and Paington are seaside resorts with a big summer population and much quieter the rest of the year, with the usual shortage of jobs in off season. There are some sleazy bits in those towns, and they support a large number of young unemployed and those who've migrated from big cities in search for fresh opportunities but are still struggling to survive. Drugs and drunkenness are major social problems. The rest of the county is mainly rural, with some pretty villages (thatched roofs and fine medieval churches) but with sky-high properties (many are second homes) and few jobs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Do you have direct experience with this field of work? I have some other, more specific questions (set up, pay etc).

I'm guessing it's quite different from how it is in the US. There is no training for the kind of work my husband is doing, besides on the job stuff. Unless you're going for a specfic position like physical therapy, leadership position, nursing etc. My husband has been doing direct care only, but has many years of experience, so hopefully it will count for something. And like I said before, he's open to anything.

I can understand that employers prefer UK experience, but we're hopeful that his US experience will count for something. In the States, these jobs are usually always direct entry, with no previous experience required. Since he has about 8 years or so of experience, and has great references, he's never been short of jobs. In the US, this field has a high turnover as well, which increases his chances of employment. Is it different in the UK? It's an easy job to get into here, but many people don't have the patience to continue for very long.

Good to know about contruction field.

thanks.

In the competitive job market today, most shortlisted applicants have experience and training in similar industries and those who don't go to the bottom of the pile. While there will be induction and more job-specfic training for the successful candidates, unless your husband is going for a training post where no previous knowledge or experience is required, he is unlikely to get a look in. His overseas experience may help, but most employers are looking for relevant UK experience and training, so the more homework he can do, the stronger his application.
In the public sector work, you normally complete an application form which they provide (may be done online), and usually you are asked to submit a letter of application (or a statement in support of your application) in which you show how you can meet all the job and person specs they are looking for. Sometimes a CV is requested so you need to prepare one according to local norm. He can go on training courses to improve his chances of a job. Job Centres have details.
Construction industry (building trade) is in the doldrums because of the recession with big unemployment among skilled workers. Many training courses are being pulled as companies are no longer sending students and apprentices, so colleges aren't getting the much-needed fees income. Most training is done on a day release basis where you attend a course for one or two days while continuing your paid work. There are full-time courses for specific trade within construction (e.g. plumber, electrician, heating engineer, bricklayer, decorator etc) , and fees for those vary, but usually non-home and non-EU students pay significantly more (as they don't attract government funding). There are some cheap or free 'hobby' courses for those who want to dabble in DIY, but they don't lead to recognised qualification.
Plymouth is an attractive city with a long maritime history (Captain Drake, navy etc) and the countryside is attractive. Exeter, as I have said, has a famous and well-regarded university (ranks just below Oxbridge) and is a very fine city with a cathedral and some service industries. Other towns like Torquay and Paington are seaside resorts with a big summer population and much quieter the rest of the year, with the usual shortage of jobs in off season. There are some sleazy bits in those towns, and they support a large number of young unemployed and those who've migrated from big cities in search for fresh opportunities but are still struggling to survive. Drugs and drunkenness are major social problems. The rest of the county is mainly rural, with some pretty villages (thatched roofs and fine medieval churches) but with sky-high properties (many are second homes) and few jobs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,151 Posts
Do you have direct experience with this field of work? I have some other, more specific questions (set up, pay etc).

I'm guessing it's quite different from how it is in the US. There is no training for the kind of work my husband is doing, besides on the job stuff. Unless you're going for a specfic position like physical therapy, leadership position, nursing etc. My husband has been doing direct care only, but has many years of experience, so hopefully it will count for something. And like I said before, he's open to anything.

I can understand that employers prefer UK experience, but we're hopeful that his US experience will count for something. In the States, these jobs are usually always direct entry, with no previous experience required. Since he has about 8 years or so of experience, and has great references, he's never been short of jobs. In the US, this field has a high turnover as well, which increases his chances of employment. Is it different in the UK? It's an easy job to get into here, but many people don't have the patience to continue for very long.

Good to know about construction field.
I know enough about the care industry to comment on it, but I'm not directly involved.
If your husband is looking for a job as care assistant, yes, it's an entry-level job and on-the-job training will be given where needed, but remember it's poorly paid (around national minimum wage level, currently £5.80 an hour, £1000 a month for a 40-hour week before tax and deductions) and most workers are young people just starting out (18 years plus) or as a job by non-breadwinner (not main salary earner). Pay is ok for a single person, but not enough to support a family. Care industry is notorious for low pay and high staff turnover, though at management levels it's not too bad as a career.
If your husband is to be the main wage earner in a low-pay position, it may have an effect on getting his visa, because one of the requirements is that you as EU citizen undertake to support your husband and your child without recourse to public funds. Even a full-time salary of a care assistant will be low enough to attract some state benefits, such as working tax credit and child tax credit, maybe even welfare help with rent and council tax, which may be in breach of immigration rule. You need to get this sorted. While requirement for an EEA Family Permit (your previous question) isn't as stringent as a spouse (marriage) visa, there is a general EU rule that migrants must not become dependent on welfare payments for survival, backed up by a minimum income rule set just above the level that triggers such payments. While he may easily obtain the initial 6-month entry clearance to come to UK, his subsequent application for a 5-year family permit may be more difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the info.

I'll look further into this matter. My husband makes a decent living working two jobs here, each paying about 14 dollars an hour, with starting wage I believe 12 an hour. But we're supporting a pretty high cost of living, a 1300 dollar rent, two car payments etc. We plan to go back to living quite simply, as we have for most of our marriage.
We know that in order to get a higher pay for this type of job, we need to be close to a major city since the smaller the town, the lower the pay.

What are quangos?

there is a general EU rule that migrants must not become dependent on welfare payments for survival, backed up by a minimum income rule set just above the level that triggers such payments.
Do you know what those levels are or where I can find them? Maybe just look up UK welfare guidelines?

Of course, I could possibly generate some income on my own, but I homeschool the kids so I would have to find a work at home opportunity.

Thanks again.

I know enough about the care industry to comment on it, but I'm not directly involved.
If your husband is looking for a job as care assistant, yes, it's an entry-level job and on-the-job training will be given where needed, but remember it's poorly paid (around national minimum wage level, currently £5.80 an hour, £1000 a month for a 40-hour week before tax and deductions) and most workers are young people just starting out (18 years plus) or as a job by non-breadwinner (not main salary earner). Pay is ok for a single person, but not enough to support a family. Care industry is notorious for low pay and high staff turnover, though at management levels it's not too bad as a career.
If your husband is to be the main wage earner in a low-pay position, it may have an effect on getting his visa, because one of the requirements is that you as EU citizen undertake to support your husband and your child without recourse to public funds. Even a full-time salary of a care assistant will be low enough to attract some state benefits, such as working tax credit and child tax credit, maybe even welfare help with rent and council tax, which may be in breach of immigration rule. You need to get this sorted. While requirement for an EEA Family Permit (your previous question) isn't as stringent as a spouse (marriage) visa, there is a general EU rule that migrants must not become dependent on welfare payments for survival, backed up by a minimum income rule set just above the level that triggers such payments. While he may easily obtain the initial 6-month entry clearance to come to UK, his subsequent application for a 5-year family permit may be more difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,151 Posts
What are quangos?
Quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisation. Semi-public body set up to carry out certain functions on behalf of the national or local government. Many public functions in UK are carried out, not by government or local authorities themselves, but by a body contracted by them. Sometimes the two have close relationship, in which case it's called an executive agency (like National Health Service), and in other cases they are kept deliberately separate for financial and legal reasons (such as Network Rail).

There is a general EU rule that migrants must not become dependent on welfare payments for survival, backed up by a minimum income rule set just above the level that triggers such payments.
Do you know what those levels are or where I can find them? Maybe just look up UK welfare guidelines?

Of course, I could possibly generate some income on my own, but I homeschool the kids so I would have to find a work at home opportunity.
UK government hasn't set the precise level (unlike some other EU countries), but the rule is stated as follows:

Self-sufficient person - The EEA national must be able to show evidence that they have sufficient resources not to become a burden on the social assistance system and have comprehensive sickness insurance cover. There is no fixed amount that is regarded as 'sufficient resources'. The personal situation of each applicant must be taken into account.
An EEA national can qualify as self-sufficient based on the income of their non-EEA family member.
EUN1 - EEA Nationals

So if you aren't working, your husband's pay must be sufficient not to be seen as dependent on welfare assistance. Working for a minimum wage and supporting a family may fall foul of this rule, but it depends on Home Office ruling. In extreme cases, your whole family may be asked to leave UK in spite of your EU citizenship. This is rarely invoked, as UK government has bigger fish to catch (like estimated a million illegal migrants from outside EU), but it may become an issue when you apply for certain benefits or in any dealing with UK Border Agency, like applying for your husband's 5-year residence permit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I don't work outside of the house. My husband's experience is working in group homes for developmentally disabled for the past six years. Ideally he wants to find a different job, but he will do pretty much anything, including that. He might be interested in going back to school depending on what's available.

Thanks for the info about cornwall. Devon sounds equally fascinating, but that helps to know it's becoming a bit too attractive for the ex-urban folks.

So you think the North is the best bet for great nature, jobs, and cheaper rents? Is it a large area? What's a good base to start out? Reasonable rents and jobs being most important factors.

Thanks.
If the original question was the UK - why does everyone relate this to England? You could consider Wales and Scotland? Altho I have to admit that £400 does not rent you very much. To get the cheaper rents you would either need to be in an undesirable part of town (if you were choosing a city) or be more rural - but then transport links may be a problem.

The Uk in general is not a place to relocate to now unless you have a good job prospect. Extremely unlikey to have a landlord accept you if you do not have proof of ongoing income. I have just done a reference for a client for a six month let and we had to give proof of 2years of income. You could get round this if you are willing to pay a larger deposit. As has been referred to earlier tenancies are normally for 6 months initially and then for a rolling months. with a month's notice required on either side Will normally, in addition, take one month's rent as a deposit.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top